College Park MD

College Park, MD, United States

College Park MD

College Park, MD, United States
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Mayergoyz I.D.,University of Maryland University College | Lang G.,University of Maryland University College | Hung L.,University of Maryland University College | Tkachuk S.,University of Maryland University College | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Applied Physics | Year: 2010

Enhancement of magneto-optic effects by strong electric fields induced by plasmon resonances in metallic nanoparticles placed on (or embedded into) garnets is discussed. Theoretical and computational results on excitation of plasmon resonances in such particles are reported and compared to available experimental data. © 2010 American Institute of Physics.


Hendee W.,Rochester | Slattery P.,College Park MD | Rogers D.,Carleton University | Karellas A.,University of Massachusetts Medical School
Medical Physics | Year: 2012

There is an art to writing a scientific paper so that it communicates accurately, succinctly, and comprehensively. Developing this art comes with experience, and sharing that experience with younger physicists is an obligation of senior scientists, especially those with editorial responsibilities for the journal. In this workshop, the preparation of a scientific manuscript will be dissected so participants can appreciate how each part is developed and then assembled into a complete paper. Then the review process for the paper will be discussed, including how to examine a paper and write an insightful and constructive review. Finally, we will consider the challenge of accommodating the concerns and recommendations of a reviewer in preparing a revision of the paper. A second feature of the workshop will be a discussion of the process of electronic submission of a paper for consideration by Medical Physics. The web‐based PeerX‐Press engine for manuscript submission and management will be examined, with attention to special features such as epaps and line‐referencing. Finally, new features of Medical Physics will be explained, such as Vision 20/20 manuscripts, Physics Letters and the standardized formatting of book reviews. Learning Objectives: 1. Improve the participants' abilities to write a scientific manuscript. 2. Understand the review process for Medical Physics manuscripts and how to participate in and benefit from it. 3. Appreciate the many features of the PeerX‐Press electronic management process for Medical Physics manuscripts. 4. Develop a knowledge of new features of Medical Physics. © 2012, American Association of Physicists in Medicine. All rights reserved.


Nalli N.R.,5830 University Research Court | Nalli N.R.,College Park MD | Barnet C.D.,STC | Reale A.,National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | And 18 more authors.
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres | Year: 2013

The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Cross-track Infrared Microwave Sounder Suite (CrIMSS) is an advanced operational satellite sounding system concept comprised of the Cross-track Infrared Sounder and the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder. These are synergistically designed to retrieve key environmental data records (EDR), namely atmospheric vertical temperature, moisture, and pressure profiles. CrIMSS will serve as the low-Earth orbit satellite sounding system, starting with the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite and spanning the JPSS-1 and JPSS-2 satellites. This paper organizes the general paradigm for validation of atmospheric profile EDR retrieved from satellite nadir sounder systems (e.g., CrIMSS) as a synthesis of complementary methods and statistical assessment metrics. The validation methodology is ordered hierarchically to include global numerical model comparisons, satellite EDR intercomparisons, radiosonde matchup assessments (conventional, dedicated, and reference), and intensive campaign "dissections." We develop and recommend the proper approach for computing profile statistics relative to correlative data derived from high-resolution in situ data (viz., radiosondes) reduced to forward model layers. The standard statistical metrics used for EDR product assessments on "coarse layers" are defined along with an overview of water vapor weighting schemes and the use of averaging kernels. We then overview the application of the methodology to CrIMSS within the context of the JPSS calibration/validation program, with focus given to summarizing the core data sets to be used for validation of S-NPP sounder EDR products. Key Points A general paradigm for validation of satellite sounder EDRs is formulated A treatise on the statistical techniques for EDR validation is presented Application of the methodology toward S-NPP CrIMSS validation is overviewed ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.


Sun B.,The Center for Satellite Applications and Research | Reale A.,The Center for Satellite Applications and Research | Schroeder S.,Texas A&M University | Seidel D.J.,College Park MD | Ballish B.,National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres | Year: 2013

Radiation-induced biases in global operational radiosonde temperature data from May 2008 to August 2011 are examined by using spatially and temporally collocated Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) data as estimates of the truth. The data on average from most radiosonde types show a nighttime cold bias and a daytime warm bias relative to COSMIC. Most daytime biases increase with altitude and solar elevation angle (SEA). The global average biases in the 15-70 hPa layer are -0.05 ± 1.89 K standard deviation (~52,000 profiles) at night and 0.39 ± 1.80 K standard deviation (~64,500 profiles) in daytime (SEA > 7.5°). Daytime warm biases associated with clouds are smaller than those under clear conditions. Newer sondes (post-2000) have smaller biases and appear to be less sensitive to effects of clouds. Biases at night show greater seasonal and zonal variations than those for daytime. In general, warm night biases are associated with warm climate regimes and less warm or cold night biases with cold climate regimes. Bias characteristics for 13 major radiosonde types are provided, as a basis for updating radiosonde corrections used in numerical weather predictions, for validating satellite retrievals, and for adjusting archived radiosonde data to create consistent climate records. Key Points The analysis aims to facilitate improvements in radiosonde bias corrections ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.


Flynn L.,National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | Long C.,National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | Wu X.,National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | Evans R.,National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | And 13 more authors.
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres | Year: 2014

NOAA, through the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) program, in partnership with the National Aeronautical and Space Administration, launched the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, a risk reduction and data continuity mission, on 28 October 2011. The JPSS program is executing the S-NPP Calibration and Validation program to ensure that the data products comply with the requirements of the sponsoring agencies. The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) consists of two telescopes feeding three detectors measuring solar radiance scattered by the Earth's atmosphere directly and solar irradiance by using diffusers. The measurements are used to generate estimates of total column ozone and vertical ozone profiles for use in near-real-time applications and extension of ozone climate data records. The calibration and validation efforts are progressing well, and both Level 1 (Sensor Data Records) and Level 2 (Ozone Environmental Data Records) have advanced to release at Provisional Maturity. This paper provides information on the product performance over the first 22 months of the mission. The products are evaluated through the use of internal consistency analysis techniques and comparisons to other satellite instrument and ground-based products. The initial performance finds total ozone showing negative bias of 2 to 4% with respect to correlative products and ozone profiles often within ±5% in the middle and upper stratosphere of current operational products. Potential improvements in the measurements and algorithms are identified. These will be implemented in coming months to reduce the differences further. Key Points OMPS nadir total column ozone and ozone profile products are performing well Deficiencies have been identified but the remedies are known Further improvements to the SDR will be implemented in the system soon ©2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

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