Borough of Bronx, NY, United States

College of Mount Saint Vincent

www.mountsaintvincent.edu/
Borough of Bronx, NY, United States

The College of Mount Saint Vincent is a Catholic liberal arts college located in the northwest corner of the Riverdale section of The Bronx, New York, adjacent to the Yonkers border. It is the northernmost location in New York City. It was founded by the Sisters of Charity of New York.Today, the school serves 1,800 students, with professional undergraduate programs in nursing, business, communication, and education. In addition, the college offers a strong liberal arts undergraduate curriculum with distinctive strengths in biology, biochemistry, English, psychology, and sociology. The College also offers graduate degree programs in nursing, business, TESOL and education.The college is the peak of the educational network under the care of the Sisters of Charity of New York, one of several Sisters of Charity congregations of Catholic women that trace their lineage back to Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton. Wikipedia.


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Alexander K.E.,College of Mount Saint Vincent
PeerJ | Year: 2017

Background. Previous work demonstrated that individuals with higher levels of attachment anxiety are prone to increased binge eating (Alexander & Siegel, 2013). Given that our society rejects obese individuals and individuals with higher levels of attachment anxiety tend to be highly sensitive to rejection (Downey & Feldman, 1996), it follows that those with increased attachment anxiety may be especially fearful of becoming fat. Methods. Undergraduate psychology students (nD148) completed surveys measuring attachment, binge eating, and fear of becoming fat. Results. The data demonstrate that attachment anxiety is positively associated with a fear of becoming fat (β D:30, p<:001) and binge eating mediates this relationship. In other words, binge eating underlies the fear of becoming fat. Discussion. These findings contribute to a more refined understanding of binge eating which may create pathways for professionals to develop targeted interventions. © 2017 Alexander.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has evaluated the top colleges in New York state for 2017. Of the 50 four-year schools who made the site’s “Best” list, Columbia University in the City of New York, Cornell University, Yeshiva University, University of Rochester and New York University were in the top five. Of the 39 two-year schools that were included, Monroe Community College, Hudson Valley Community College, Niagara County Community College, SUNY Westchester Community College and Genesee Community college took the top five spots. A full list of schools is included below. “New York state offers a wide variety of educational options, but the schools on our list are those going the extra mile for students,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “Not only do they offer outstanding certificate and degree programs, they also provide students with resources that help them make successful career choices after college.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in New York” list, institutions must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit schools. Each college is ranked on additional statistics including the number of degree programs offered, the availability of career and academic resources, the opportunity for financial aid, graduation rates and annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in New York” list, visit: The Best Four-Year Colleges in New York for 2017 include: Adelphi University Alfred University Barnard College Canisius College Clarkson University Colgate University College of Mount Saint Vincent Columbia University in the City of New York Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art Cornell University CUNY Bernard M Baruch College CUNY City College CUNY Hunter College CUNY Queens College Daemen College D'Youville College Fordham University Hamilton College Hartwick College Hobart William Smith Colleges Hofstra University Houghton College Iona College Ithaca College Le Moyne College LIU Post Manhattan College Manhattanville College Marist College Molloy College Nazareth College New York University Niagara University Pace University-New York Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Rochester Institute of Technology Saint John Fisher College Saint Joseph's College-New York Siena College St Bonaventure University St John's University-New York St Lawrence University Stony Brook University SUNY at Binghamton Syracuse University Union College University at Buffalo University of Rochester Vassar College Yeshiva University The Best Two-Year Colleges in New York for 2017 include: Adirondack Community College Bramson ORT College Bronx Community College Cayuga County Community College Clinton Community College Columbia-Greene Community College Corning Community College CUNY Borough of Manhattan Community College CUNY LaGuardia Community College Dutchess Community College Erie Community College Finger Lakes Community College Fulton-Montgomery Community College Genesee Community College Herkimer County Community College Hostos Community College Hudson Valley Community College Jamestown Community College Jefferson Community College Kingsborough Community College Mohawk Valley Community College Monroe Community College Nassau Community College New York Methodist Hospital Center for Allied Health Education Niagara County Community College North Country Community College Onondaga Community College Professional Business College Queensborough Community College Rockland Community College Schenectady County Community College Stella and Charles Guttman Community College Suffolk County Community College SUNY Broome Community College SUNY Orange SUNY Sullivan SUNY Ulster SUNY Westchester Community College Tompkins Cortland Community College ### About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


The International Nurses Association is pleased to welcome Riad A. Aboujamous, RN, to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare. Riad A. Aboujamous is a Family Nurse Practitioner currently serving patients within Monte Cristo Family Clinic in Edinburg, Texas. With more than 26 years of experience in nursing, he is a specialist in family care nursing. Riad’s career in nursing began in 1990 when he graduated with his Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing from the American University of Beirut in Lebanon. Upon relocating to the United States, he went on to gain his Master of Science Degree in Nursing from the College of Mount Saint Vincent, before attending the University of Texas, becoming a Family Nurse Practitioner. Riad holds additional certifications in Basic Life Support, Advanced Cardiac Life Support, and Pediatric Advanced Life Support. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in nursing, Riad maintains a professional membership with the American Nurses Credentialing Center. He attributes his success to his love for helping patients, and in his free time Riad can be found playing soccer. Learn more about Riad A. Aboujamous here: http://inanurse.org/network/index.php?do=/4136321/info/ and be sure to read his upcoming publication in Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.


The International Nurses Association is pleased to welcome Alexander Goldsmith, BSN, to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare. Alexander Goldsmith is a Registered Nurse with two years of experience in his field and an extensive expertise in all facets of nursing, especially medical/surgical nursing. Alexander is currently serving patients within LibertyHealth Jersey City Medical Center in Jersey City, New Jersey. Alexander attended the College of Mount Saint Vincent in New York City, graduating with his Bachelor of Applied Science Degree in 2015, becoming a registered nurse. Prior to this, Alexander obtained his Bachelor of Talmudic Law Degree in 2006 from the Talmudic College of Florida, followed by his Physical Sciences Degree in 2012 from Middlesex Community College. He holds additional certifications in Basic Life Support, Advanced Cardiac Life Support, and Pediatric Advanced Life Support. An inductee of the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, Alexander attributes his success to his experience, and being highly motivated. When he is not assisting his patients, Alexander enjoys sports. Learn more about Alexander Goldsmith here: http://inanurse.org/network/index.php?do=/4135535/info/ and be sure to read his upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.


Cooke S.A.,Purchase College SUNY | Minei A.J.,College of Mount Saint Vincent
Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy | Year: 2013

Broadband rotational free induction decays (FIDs) from 1H,2H- perfluorocyclobutane have been captured at a rate of 25 ps/point for a duration of 20 μs. FIDs have been treated using fast Fourier transformation (FFT) and singular value decomposition (SVD). It is demonstrated that the SVD-based model can yield a sufficient number of accurate transition frequencies for initial spectral analysis using only ≈1% (200 ns) of the FID. Furthermore, the SVD-based analysis has produced information concerning transition phase, amplitude, damping, and frequency for the strongest molecular signals. The damping factors determined appear useful in distinguishing molecular and non-molecular signals. The FFT analysis of the full FID has yielded, for the first time, spectroscopic parameters for the parent and all C-13 isotopologues of both the cis and trans species. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Spermatogenesis in all animal species occurs within a syncytium. Only at the very end of spermatogenesis are individual sperm cells resolved from this syncytium in a process known as individualization. Individualization in Drosophila begins as a membrane-cytoskeletal complex known as the individualization complex (IC) assembles around the sperm heads and proceeds down the flagella, removing cytoplasm from between the sperm tails and shrink-wrapping each spermatid into its own plasma membrane as it travels. The mulet (mlt) mutation results in severely disrupted ICs, indicating that the mlt gene product is required for individualization. Inverse PCR followed by cycle sequencing maps all known P-insertion alleles of mlt to two overlapping genes, CG12214 (the Drosophila tubulin-binding cofactor E-like homolog) and KCNQ (a large voltage-gated potassium channel). However, since the alleles of mlt map to the 5'-UTR of CG12214 and since CG12214 is contained within an intron of KCNQ, it was hypothesized that mlt and CG12214 are allelic. Indeed, CG12214 mutant testes exhibited severely disrupted ICs and were indistinguishable from mlt mutant testes, thus further suggesting allelism. To test this hypothesis, alleles of mlt were crossed to CG12214 in order to generate trans-heterozygous males. Testes from all trans-heterozygous combinations revealed severely disrupted ICs and were also indistinguishable from mlt mutant testes, indicating that mlt and CG12214 fail to complement one another and are thus allelic. In addition, complementation testing against null alleles of KCNQ verified that the observed individualization defect is not caused by a disruption of KCNQ. Finally, since a population of spermatid-associated microtubules known to disappear prior to movement of the IC abnormally persists during individualization in CG12214 mutant testes, this work implicates TBCE-like in the removal of these microtubules prior to IC movement. Taken together, these results identify mlt as CG12214 and suggest that the removal of microtubules by TBCE-like is a necessary pre-requisite for proper coordinated movement of the IC.


Meyers C.B.,College of Mount Saint Vincent
Journal of Radio and Audio Media | Year: 2016

Research into the roles, perspectives, and strategies of specific radio-era sponsors could provide new insights into the history of radio and American culture. I provide a brief overview of major tobacco, food, soap, and automobile sponsors and discuss the challenges of researching the role of corporations in American cultural history. With the aim of encouraging more scholarship, I suggest that analyzing radio sponsors could produce work on a variety of topics of broad interest, from the cultural history of cigarettes, promoted on dozens of tobacco-sponsored programs, to the representation of gender through sound on the Betty Crocker radio shows (1924–53). © 2016 Broadcast Education Association.

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