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Gangtok, India

The College of Agricultural Engineering and Post Harvest Technology , located in Ranipool, Gangtok , is one of the seven constituent colleges of the only Central Agricultural University in India, funded by the Government of India through the Ministry of Agriculture, Department of Agriculture Research and Education . This college is considered among the top three colleges under the UGC-ICAR system. It imparts education, research and extension in the field of agricultural engineering. It aims to provide qualified technical human resource in agricultural and food process engineering to the public and industrial sector of northeast India through its undergraduate and postgraduate programmes. Wikipedia.


Mohapatra D.,Anand Agricultural University | Mishra S.,College of Agricultural Engineering and Post Harvest Technology | Singh C.B.,University of Manitoba | Jayas D.S.,University of Manitoba
Food and Bioprocess Technology | Year: 2011

Banana has a special place in the daily diet of millions of people around the world for sustenance and nutrient enrichment. Some of the popular food uses of banana are chips, raw ripened fruit, cooked green banana, fermented and unfermented beverages, juice, puree, dried flour for bakery and infant formula food. Banana is also used as a starch source for various chemicals and packaging materials. The storability and functional properties of these products can be altered by the application of various innovative food processing technologies. This review article focuses on different banana products, their potential for non-conventional uses and associated prospective novel processing techniques for value addition and preservation. © 2010 Springer Science + Business Media, LLC. Source


Chandra R.,College of Agricultural Engineering and Post Harvest Technology | Chandra R.,EcoTopia Science Institute | Takeuchi H.,EcoTopia Science Institute | Hasegawa T.,EcoTopia Science Institute
Applied Energy | Year: 2012

This paper presents the results of an experimental batch methane fermentation (at 37°C mesophilic temperature) study carried out on untreated and pretreated substrates of rice straw using NaOH and hydrothermal pretreatments. 3% NaOH pretreatment was given to ground rice straw biomass for 120h at 37°C and hydrothermal pretreatment was given for 10min at 200°C. It was observed that NaOH addition is a mandatory requirement for maintaining a suitable range of pH and starting the biogas production from hydrothermal pretreated biomass slurry of rice straw. The fed substrate concentrations were maintained at 5% TS (50g TS/L). The study revealed into 140.0L/kg VSa biogas and 59.8L/kg VSa methane from untreated rice straw substrate. However, NaOH pretreated substrate resulted into 184.8L/kg VSa biogas and 74.1L/kg VSa methane. Hydrothermal pretreated followed by 5% NaOH added substrate resulted into highest biogas and methane production yields as 315.9L/kg VSa and 132.7L/kg VSa, respectively. NaOH pretreated substrate showed an increase of 132.0% in biogas production and 123.9% in methane production relative to the untreated substrate. However, the hydrothermal pretreated substrate had resulted into an increase of 225.6% in biogas production and 222.0% in methane production relative to untreated rice straw substrate. Hydrothermal pretreatment provided an accelerated pre-hydrolysis of biomass contents during the treatment process and thereby resulted into enhanced biogas and methane production yields. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Chandra R.,College of Agricultural Engineering and Post Harvest Technology | Chandra R.,EcoTopia Science Institute | Takeuchi H.,EcoTopia Science Institute | Hasegawa T.,EcoTopia Science Institute | Kumar R.,Indian Institute of Technology Indore
Energy | Year: 2012

This paper presents the results of an experimental methane fermentation study on untreated, NaOH and hydrothermal pretreated substrates of wheat straw. Experiments were conducted at 37 °C (mesophilic temperature). Substrates concentration were maintained at 4.45% VS (44.5 g VS/L). Untreated wheat straw substrate had resulted into specific methane and biogas production yields of 78.4 L/kg VS a and 188.4 L/kg VS a, respectively. The specific methane and biogas production yield of NaOH pretreated wheat straw substrate had resulted into 165.9 L/kg VS a and 353.2 L/kg VS a, respectively. Hydrothermal pretreated wheat straw substrate had resulted to yield specific methane and biogas production of 94.1 L/kg VS a and 205.7 L/kg VS a, respectively. NaOH pretreated substrate produced 87.5% higher biogas production and 111.6% higher methane production compared to the untreated wheat straw substrate. Hydrothermal pretreated substrate had resulted into an increase of 9.2% in biogas production and 20.0% in methane production compared to that of untreated wheat straw substrate. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Vashisht A.K.,College of Agricultural Engineering and Post Harvest Technology
Applied Energy | Year: 2012

Traditional watermills of the Himalayan region are centuries old water-power driven small-scale industry which is serving mountain inhabitants till date. But, day by day it is becoming tough for this eco-friendly technology to keep pace with modern technologies; hence its future is dubious now. Various organizations throughout the world are trying to rejuvenate and re-popularize this environment-friendly technology for multipurpose use. However, instead of improving its existing design, stress is being given to increase the adoptability of new-design watermill. In spite of all efforts, the new-design watermill has not shown any sharp impact on its adoptability rate. Certainly, there are issues which are not considered while implementing line of action. Before commencing the study, thorough discussions on the issues affecting the watermills' existence in the region were made with the remotely residing watermill owners. Complete study is divided into two parts. In the first part, the issues that are deciding the fate of watermills' existence in the region are discussed. Keeping all discussed-issues in mind, design of various components of an in-operation watermill is reviewed and modifications are proposed for increasing its efficiency. For the purpose, analytical expressions for evaluating watermill efficiency are also derived. © 2012. Source


Mohapatra D.,Anand Agricultural University | Mishra S.,College of Agricultural Engineering and Post Harvest Technology | Sutar N.,Anand Agricultural University
Journal of Scientific and Industrial Research | Year: 2010

Banana serves as an ideal and low cost food source for developing countries where most of the population rely mostly on bananas for food. Banana plant parts are useful as insecticide, antioxidant, colour absorber, in preparation of various functional foods, wine, alcohol, biogas, cattle feed etc. This review discusses usefulness of banana fruits, peel, leaves, pseudostem, sheath, pith and male bud, and prospects of using these materials in industry. Source

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