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Harwell Campus SWINDON, 27-Feb-2017 — /EuropaWire/ — A major new £100 million investment by the government into the development of an innovative multi-disciplinary science and technology research centre was announced today (Thursday 23 February 2017) by Business Secretary Greg Clark. The new Rosalind Franklin Institute (RFI) – named in honour of the pioneering British scientist whose use of X-rays to study biological structures played a crucial role in the discovery of DNA‘s ‘double helix’ structure by Francis Crick and James Watson – will bring together UK strengths in the physical sciences, engineering and life sciences to create a national centre of excellence in technology development and innovation. The new Rosalind Franklin Institute will have a hub based at the Harwell campus It will bring together UK expertise to develop new technologies that will transform our understanding of disease and speed up the development of new treatments Part of the government’s Industrial Strategy to maintain the UK’s global leadership in science, innovation and research Business Secretary Greg Clark said: The UK has always been a pioneer in the world of science, technology and medical research. It’s this excellence we want to continue to build on and why we made science and research a central part of our Industrial Strategy – strengthening links between research and industry, ensuring more home-grown innovation continues to benefit millions around the world. Named after one of the UK’s leading chemists, the new Rosalind Franklin Institute will inspire and house scientists who could be responsible for the next great discovery that will maintain the UK’s position at the forefront of global science for years to come. Delivered and managed by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the RFI will bring together academic and industry researchers from across the UK to develop disruptive new technologies designed to tackle major challenges in health and life sciences, accelerate the discovery of new treatments for chronic diseases affecting millions of people around the world (such as dementia), and deliver new jobs and long-term growth to the local and UK economies. Chair of the Research Councils and EPSRC Chief Executive, Professor Philip Nelson said: The UK is currently in a world leading position when it comes to developing new medical treatments and technologies in the life sciences. However, other countries are alive to the potential and are already investing heavily. The Rosalind Franklin Institute will help secure the country as one of the best places in the world to research, discover, and innovate. The central hub at Harwell will link to partner sites at the universities of Cambridge, Edinburgh, Manchester and Oxford, Imperial College, King’s College London, and University College London. Industry partners will be on board from the outset, and the Institute will grow over time, as more universities and researchers participate. The work at new Institute will contribute directly to the delivery of EPSRC‘s ‘Healthy Nation’ prosperity outcome, its Healthcare Technologies programme, and to the Technology Touching Life initiative that spans three research councils (the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), the Medical Research Council (MRC) and EPSRC) and seeks to foster interdisciplinary technology development research across the engineering, physical and life sciences. The development of the RFI has been led by Professor Ian Walmsley, FRS, from the University of Oxford, who said: This is a new joint venture between some of the UK’s leading universities and key partners in industry and research councils. The aim is to speed the application of cutting-edge physical science insights, methods and techniques to health and life sciences by providing an interface between research programmes at the forefront of these areas, co-located at Harwell and connected, dynamically, to the wider UK research base. We anticipate innovative new businesses will grow from this effort over time, as the Institute will engage with a range of key industries from inception. A collaborative joint venture model allows the RFI to make the most of interactions and draw on a wide range of existing research excellence from across the UK. Patrick Vallance, President of R&D at GSK said: We welcome the creation of the RFI which will bring world-leading, multi-disciplinary teams from industry and academia closer together, and will further strengthen the UK as a place to translate excellent science into patient benefit. Through collaboration we will be able to make advances in life science technologies much quicker than we could manage alone. Research at the RFI will initially be centred on five selected technology themes, focusing on next-generation imaging technologies – X-ray science, correlated imaging (combining X-ray, electron and light microscopy), imaging by sound and light, and biological mass spectrometry – and on new chemical methods and strategies for drug discovery. Dame Carol Robinson, FRS, who is leading the RFI‘s biological mass spectrometry theme, and received the 2004 Royal Society Rosalind Franklin Award that recognises outstanding scientific contributions and supports the promotion of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, said: It is fitting that this new Institute bears Rosalind Franklin’s name. She achieved so much in a relatively short life and without her work many of the advances that have taken place since would not have come about. Work in the Institute will include development of the next-generation of physical tools including mass spectrometry, instruments for X-ray science and for advanced microscopy – fields directly descended from her research interests. Notes for Editors: The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) As the main funding agency for engineering and physical sciences research, our vision is for the UK to be the best place in the world to Research, Discover and Innovate. By investing £800 million a year in research and postgraduate training, we are building the knowledge and skills base needed to address the scientific and technological challenges facing the nation. Our portfolio covers a vast range of fields from healthcare technologies to structural engineering, manufacturing to mathematics, advanced materials to chemistry. The research we fund has impact across all sectors. It provides a platform for future economic development in the UK and improvements for everyone’s health, lifestyle and culture. We work collectively with our partners and other Research Councils on issues of common concern via Research Councils UK. The Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) STFC is keeping the UK at the forefront of international science and tackling some of the most significant challenges facing society such as meeting our future energy needs, monitoring and understanding climate change, and global security. The Council has a broad science portfolio and works with the academic and industrial communities to share its expertise in materials science, space and ground-based astronomy technologies, laser science, microelectronics, wafer scale manufacturing, particle and nuclear physics, alternative energy production, radio communications and radar. STFC operates or hosts world class experimental facilities including in the UK the ISIS pulsed neutron source, the Central Laser Facility, and LOFAR, and is also the majority shareholder in Diamond Light Source Ltd. It enables UK researchers to access leading international science facilities by funding membership of international bodies including European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL), European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO). STFC is one of seven publicly-funded research councils. It is an independent, non-departmental public body of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS). The Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) BBSRC invests in world-class bioscience research and training on behalf of the UK public. Our aim is to further scientific knowledge, to promote economic growth, wealth and job creation and to improve quality of life in the UK and beyond. Funded by Government, BBSRC invested £473M in world-class bioscience, people and research infrastructure in 2015-16. We support research and training in universities and strategically funded institutes. BBSRC research and the people we fund are helping society to meet major challenges, including food security, green energy and healthier, longer lives. Our investments underpin important UK economic sectors, such as farming, food, industrial biotechnology and pharmaceuticals. More information about BBSRC strategically funded institutes. The Medical Research Council (MRC) The Medical Research Council is at the forefront of scientific discovery to improve human health. Founded in 1913 to tackle tuberculosis, the MRC now invests taxpayers’ money in some of the best medical research in the world across every area of health. Thirty-one MRC-funded researchers have won Nobel prizes in a wide range of disciplines, and MRC scientists have been behind such diverse discoveries as vitamins, the structure of DNA and the link between smoking and cancer, as well as achievements such as pioneering the use of randomised controlled trials, the invention of MRI scanning, and the development of a group of antibodies used in the making of some of the most successful drugs ever developed. Today, MRC-funded scientists tackle some of the greatest health problems facing humanity in the 21st century, from the rising tide of chronic diseases associated with ageing to the threats posed by rapidly mutating micro-organisms. www.mrc.ac.uk Diamond Light Source Diamond Light Source is the UK’s synchrotron science facility, and is approximately the size of Wembley Stadium. It works like a giant microscope, harnessing the power of electrons to produce bright light that scientists can use to study anything from fossils to jet engines to viruses and vaccines. Diamond is used by thousands of academic and industrial researchers across a wide range of disciplines, including structural biology, health and medicine, solid-state physics, materials & magnetism, nanoscience, electronics, earth & environmental sciences, chemistry, cultural heritage, energy and engineering. Many everyday commodities that we take for granted, from food manufacturing to consumer products, from revolutionary drugs to surgical tools, from computers to mobile phones, have all been developed or improved using synchrotron light. Diamond generates extremely intense pin-point beams of synchrotron light. These are of exceptional quality, and range from X-rays to ultraviolet to infrared. Diamond’s X-rays are around 10 billion times brighter than the sun. Diamond is one of the most advanced scientific facilities in the world, and its pioneering capabilities are helping to keep the UK at the forefront of scientific research. 2017 marks a double celebration for Diamond – 15 years since the company was formed, and 10 years of research and innovation. In this time, researchers who have obtained their data at Diamond have authored over 5,000 papers. The institute is funded by the UK Government through the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), and by the Wellcome Trust The Harwell Campus Harwell Campus is a public private partnership between Harwell Oxford Partners, U+I Group PLC and two Government backed agencies, the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) and the UK Atomic Energy Agency (UKAEA). Harwell is one of the world’s most important science and innovation locations. It has a growing reputation as the UK’s gateway to space with over 65 space and satellite applications related organisations located on campus and is now seeing rapid growth in the Life Sciences and HealthTec sector with over 1,000 people working in this field alone at Harwell. In addition to space and life sciences, the campus hosts an array of other key sectors including, Big Data and Supercomputing, Energy and Environment and Advanced Engineering and Materials. With a legacy of many world firsts, the campus comprises 710 acres, over 200 organisations and 5,500 people. Harwell Campus is the UK’s National Science Facility and is among Europe and the world’s leading sites dedicated to the advancement of science, technology and innovation. Having spent 75 years at the forefront of British innovation and discovery, Harwell Campus continues to drive scientific advancements to the benefit of the UK economy and centred around a community hub. Science experts, academics, government organisations, private sector R&D departments and investors create an environment where innovation, collaboration and discovery thrive. Harwell’s Cluster Strategy The Cluster of about 70 Space organisations at Harwell is testament to the power of co-locating industry, academia and the public sector alongside investors and entrepreneurs. The European Space Agency, RAL Space, The UK Space Agency, Airbus, Thales Alenia Space, Lockheed Martin, and Deimos Space UK can all be found on the Campus. This creates many opportunities for collaboration, increasing capability and sharing risk. Being within a Cluster brings access to high-quality common infrastructure, facilities and expertise, alongside exposure to new markets The Harwell vision is to be home to a number of Clusters that exploit the existing strengths of the Campus. The next step is a new HealthTec Cluster that will benefit from the considerable synergies across the life and physical sciences capabilities of the Campus and the Space cluster. These clusters will enrich each other, creating a powerful multidisciplinary environment tailored to problem solving that will allow the UK to compete with the best in the world. The clustering of industries, facilities and science experts has given rise to the term Harwell Effect – and is an ideal model for future science and business innovation programmes. Science clusters drive economic growth. MIT has created businesses with a combined value of $3tn, the equivalent of California’s GDP. Harwell Campus is the only location in the UK with the potential to emulate this success. To find out more about events, open days or the new developments, visit the Harwell Campus website. SOURCE: EPSRC Contact Details In the following table, contact information relevant to the page. The first column is for visual reference only. Data is in the right column. Name: EPSRC Press Office Telephone: 01793 444404


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 28, 2017 -- Limitations of the piezoelectric array technologies conventionally used for ultrasonics inspired a group of University College London researchers to explore an alternative mechanism for generating ultrasound via light, also known as the photoacoustic effect. Coupling this with 3-D printing, the group was able to generate sounds fields with specific shapes for potential use in biological cell manipulation and drug delivery. Piezoelectric materials generate mechanical stress in response to an applied electric field, resulting in a usable and precisely controllable force that can, for example, be used to create sound waves. But achieving this control with conventional piezoelectric arrays requires both complicated electronics and large numbers of extremely small individual components which are expensive and difficult to manufacture. The photoacoustic effect, in contrast, occurs when a short pulse or modulated source of light is absorbed by a material, producing a sound wave. As the group reports in this week's Applied Physics Letters, from AIP Publishing, their work focuses on using the photoacoustic effect to control ultrasound fields in 3-D. "One useful feature of the photoacoustic effect is that the initial shape of the sound that's generated is determined [by] where the light is absorbed," said Michael Brown, a doctoral student at the Biomedical Ultrasound Group of the Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering at University College London. "This can be used to create tightly focused intense points of sound just by depositing an optical absorber on a concave surface, which acts like a lens." More generally, it's possible to manufacture samples with nearly any surface shape by using a 3-D printer and a transparent material. "By depositing an optical absorber on this surface, which can be done via spray painting, a sound wave of nearly any shape can be created by illuminating this sample with a laser," Brown said. "If you carefully tailor the design of the surface and therefore the shape of the acoustic wave, it's possible to control where the sound field will focus and even create fields focused over continuous shapes. We're using letters and numbers." This is particularly significant because, in theory, the ability to control the shape of the wavefront -- the surface over which the sound wave has a constant phase, somewhat like the edge of the wave -- enables a large degree of control over the resulting field. "But actually designing a wavefront that generates a desired pattern becomes more challenging as the complexity of the target increases," Brown said. "A clear 'best' design is only available for a few select cases, such as the generation of a single focus." To overcome this limitation, the group "developed an algorithm that allows users to input a desired sound field in 3-D, and it then outputs a 3-D printable surface profile that generates this field," Brown said. "Our algorithm allows for precise control of the intensity of sound at different locations and the time at which the sound arrives, making it quick and easy to design surfaces or 'lenses' for a desired application." Brown and his colleagues demonstrated the effectiveness of their algorithm by creating a lens designed to generate a sound field shaped like the numeral 7. After illuminating the lens by a pulsed laser, they recorded the sound field and the desired "7" was clearly visible with high contrast. "It was the first demonstration of generating a multi-focal distribution of sound using this approach," Brown said. There are many potential uses for the tailored optoacoustic profiles created by the group. "Highly intense sound can cause heating or exert forces on objects, such as in acoustic tweezers," Brown said. "And similar single-focus devices are already being used for cleaving cell clusters and targeted drug delivery, so our work could be useful within that area." The group is also interested in the effects of propagating through tissue, which introduces distortions to the shape of wavefronts caused by variations in the speed of sound. "If the structure of the tissue is known beforehand via imaging, our approach can be used to correct for these aberrations," Brown said. "Manipulating the shape and time during which the focused sound is generated can also be useful for the maneuvering and controlling biological cells and other particles." Going forward, Brown and his group hope to investigate the use of other light sources and what advantages they might offer. "One limitation of our work was the use of a single-pulsed laser," Brown said. "This meant that the temporal shape of the sound generated from the sample was only one short pulse, which limited the complexity of the fields that could be generated. In the future, we're interested in using alternative modulated optical sources to illuminate these devices." The article, "Generating arbitrary ultrasound fields with tailored optoacoustic surface profiles," is authored by Michael Brown, Daniil Nikitichev, Bradley E. Treeby and Ben Cox. The article will appear in the journal Applied Physics Letters Feb. 28, 2017 (DOI: 10.1063/1.4976942). After that date, it can be accessed at http://aip. . Applied Physics Letters features concise, rapid reports on significant new findings in applied physics. The journal covers new experimental and theoretical research on applications of physics phenomena related to all branches of science, engineering, and modern technology. See http://apl. .


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Together with university research partner King's College London, Ericsson (NASDAQ: ERIC) and BT have signed a multi-year collaboration agreement on 5G testing and development. King's College contributes with low-latency use cases and specialized knowledge in communication technologies, robotics and haptic control. The collaboration will focus on creating 5G use cases in commercial and consumer markets, with particular focus on mission-critical services such as medical applications. It will involve research into the technical and economic aspects of key 5G-enabling technologies. With the ambition to be first to market with 5G services in the UK, BT has worked with Ericsson to build a 5G Proof of Concept Center at the BT Labs in Adastral Park, Ipswich. With access to the 5G for Europe core network - linking multiple centers and universities across Europe - Ericsson and BT are testing the network architecture needed to most efficiently deliver commercial 5G services. Howard Watson, CEO, BT Technology, Service & Operations, and BT Group CIO, says: "The initial focus of the collaboration is on Proof of Concept solutions and trials of services needing both high availability and low latency - both key features of the forthcoming 5G technology." In 2016, BT bought EE, the United Kingdom's leading 4G network provider. Together, we have the opportunity to build on our existing infrastructure to create a truly converged fixed and mobile network. We look forward to working with Ericsson and Kings College London as we examine the possibilities of 5G, and what it can deliver in terms of flexibility, scalability and the high bandwidths that our customers will require in the future." Anders Lindblad, Senior Vice President and Head of Business Unit IT & Cloud Products, says:"5G is the foundation for expanding the potential to all Industries.  The cooperation with BT to trial services using 5G technology demonstrates Ericsson's commitment to drive market demand and adoption. By establishing network slices in the context of 5G will be like virtual networks on-demand, and will be crucial for the mission-critical services being trialed." A demonstration of these capabilities will be on display outside Ericsson's Hall 2 at Mobile World Congress. BT's purpose is to use the power of communications to make a better world. It is one of the world's leading providers of communications services and solutions, serving customers in 180 countries. Its principal activities include the provision of networked IT services globally; local, national and international telecommunications services to its customers for use at home, at work and on the move; broadband, TV and internet products and services; and converged fixed-mobile products and services.  BT consists of six customer-facing lines of business: Consumer, EE, Business and Public Sector, Global Services, Wholesale and Ventures, and Openreach. For the year ended 31 March 2016, BT Group's reported revenue was £19,042m with reported profit before taxation of £3,029m. British Telecommunications plc (BT) is a wholly-owned subsidiary of BT Group plc and encompasses virtually all businesses and assets of the BT Group. BT Group plc is listed on stock exchanges in London and New York. Anything can happen on the digital frontier, a promising but undiscovered future. From February 27 to March 2 in Barcelona, Spain, Ericsson is demonstrating a collaborative approach and innovative solutions to succeed in this arena. With our customers and partners, we work across industries, physical boundaries and perceived limitations. Join us in Hall 2 or online during MWC 2017 and engage in conversations and demonstrations about our favorite things: 5G; platforms and services for IT, Cloud, Networks and TV & Media; connected solutions for industries; the Internet of Things; and partnering for success. See you there! Ericsson is a world leader in communications technology and services with headquarters in Stockholm, Sweden. Our organization consists of more than 111,000 experts who provide customers in 180 countries with innovative solutions and services. Together we are building a more connected future where anyone and any industry is empowered to reach their full potential. Net sales in 2016 were SEK 222.6 billion (USD 24.5 billion). The Ericsson stock is listed on Nasdaq Stockholm and on NASDAQ in New York. Read more on www.ericsson.com.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Together with university research partner King's College London, Ericsson (NASDAQ: ERIC) and BT have signed a multi-year collaboration agreement on 5G testing and development. King's College contributes with low-latency use cases and specialized knowledge in communication technologies, robotics and haptic control. The collaboration will focus on creating 5G use cases in commercial and consumer markets, with particular focus on mission-critical services such as medical applications. It will involve research into the technical and economic aspects of key 5G-enabling technologies. With the ambition to be first to market with 5G services in the UK, BT has worked with Ericsson to build a 5G Proof of Concept Center at the BT Labs in Adastral Park, Ipswich. With access to the 5G for Europe core network - linking multiple centers and universities across Europe - Ericsson and BT are testing the network architecture needed to most efficiently deliver commercial 5G services. Howard Watson, CEO, BT Technology, Service & Operations, and BT Group CIO, says: "The initial focus of the collaboration is on Proof of Concept solutions and trials of services needing both high availability and low latency - both key features of the forthcoming 5G technology." In 2016, BT bought EE, the United Kingdom's leading 4G network provider. Together, we have the opportunity to build on our existing infrastructure to create a truly converged fixed and mobile network. We look forward to working with Ericsson and Kings College London as we examine the possibilities of 5G, and what it can deliver in terms of flexibility, scalability and the high bandwidths that our customers will require in the future." Anders Lindblad, Senior Vice President and Head of Business Unit IT & Cloud Products, says:"5G is the foundation for expanding the potential to all Industries.  The cooperation with BT to trial services using 5G technology demonstrates Ericsson's commitment to drive market demand and adoption. By establishing network slices in the context of 5G will be like virtual networks on-demand, and will be crucial for the mission-critical services being trialed." A demonstration of these capabilities will be on display outside Ericsson's Hall 2 at Mobile World Congress. BT's purpose is to use the power of communications to make a better world. It is one of the world's leading providers of communications services and solutions, serving customers in 180 countries. Its principal activities include the provision of networked IT services globally; local, national and international telecommunications services to its customers for use at home, at work and on the move; broadband, TV and internet products and services; and converged fixed-mobile products and services.  BT consists of six customer-facing lines of business: Consumer, EE, Business and Public Sector, Global Services, Wholesale and Ventures, and Openreach. For the year ended 31 March 2016, BT Group's reported revenue was £19,042m with reported profit before taxation of £3,029m. British Telecommunications plc (BT) is a wholly-owned subsidiary of BT Group plc and encompasses virtually all businesses and assets of the BT Group. BT Group plc is listed on stock exchanges in London and New York. Anything can happen on the digital frontier, a promising but undiscovered future. From February 27 to March 2 in Barcelona, Spain, Ericsson is demonstrating a collaborative approach and innovative solutions to succeed in this arena. With our customers and partners, we work across industries, physical boundaries and perceived limitations. Join us in Hall 2 or online during MWC 2017 and engage in conversations and demonstrations about our favorite things: 5G; platforms and services for IT, Cloud, Networks and TV & Media; connected solutions for industries; the Internet of Things; and partnering for success. See you there! Ericsson is a world leader in communications technology and services with headquarters in Stockholm, Sweden. Our organization consists of more than 111,000 experts who provide customers in 180 countries with innovative solutions and services. Together we are building a more connected future where anyone and any industry is empowered to reach their full potential. Net sales in 2016 were SEK 222.6 billion (USD 24.5 billion). The Ericsson stock is listed on Nasdaq Stockholm and on NASDAQ in New York. Read more on www.ericsson.com.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

The discovery of the 'molecular switch' that causes inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and Celiac disease, could lead to more effective new treatments for these life-changing auto-immune conditions, according to research from scientists at King's College London and University College London. For the first time, researchers have a specific target for the treatment of these conditions by identifying an immune molecule called T-bet as the key control point that regulates this genetic risk in specific diseases. The discovery has been published in the journal PLoS Genetics. T-bet plays an important role in coordinating the body's immune responses. In patients with IBD, T-bet behaves abnormally, causing the immune reaction which leads to the development of the condition. A great deal of work has been done on the genetic predisposition to autoimmune disease over the past 10 years. However, it has been very difficult to develop effective treatments because a large number of genes each make a very small contribution to the development of these diseases. "Our research outlines a specific focus for the development of new treatments for these diseases which have such a profound effect on sufferers," said Graham Lord, co-senior author on the study and firector of the National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

- Cydar announces the appointment of Lord Davies of Abersoch as Chairman, Dr Franz B. Humer and James Downing as Non-Executive Directors - Professor John E. Deanfield to head a new Scientific and Technology Advisory Board - First US installation at Major U.S. Academic Medical Center Cydar Limited ("the Company"), a world leading cloud based surgical guidance software company, announces the appointment of a new Non-Executive Chairman and new Non-Executive Directors. Lord Davies of Abersoch has been appointed Non-Executive Chairman. Dr Franz B. Humer and James B. Downing join the Board as Non-Executive Directors. Professor John Deanfield, will head a new Scientific and Technology Advisory Board. Cydar is the first company in the world using high performance cloud computing to provide surgical guidance in the operating room. At its core, fully-automatic computer vision tracks patients during X-ray guided surgery; enabling it to combine diagnostic scans, planning information and real-time imaging with millimetre precision. "I am delighted to join Cydar as Non-Executive Chairman. The UK is a recognised leader in knowledge based industries, and commercialising British Science is a key driver for long term economic growth. Cydar represents an opportunity for the digital revolution in medicine to help break through the intelligence barrier and generate evidence based improvements for better healthcare outcomes. I look forward to working with the Board and Executives to ensure Cydar has the right strategy and human capital, to help build an innovative, global company to achieve its great potential." "Our successful transition from early-stage to growth company is testament to the efforts of our original Board and outgoing Non-Executive Chairman Mark Evans, who remains as a Non-Executive Director. We believe the skills and experience that Lord Davies, Dr Franz Humer, Jim Downing and Prof John Deanfield now bring will prove invaluable as we pursue our commercial and technology aspirations to be a world leader in cloud based surgical guidance software." First US Luminary Site at Duke University Hospital The Company also announces that it has signed its first US contract with the prestigious Duke University Hospital. This marks the Company's strategic decision to open a US gateway for its first FDA-cleared product, Cydar EV, and to pre-launch its US commercialisation strategy whilst it continues to develop its next clinical indications. Cynthia K. Shortell, M.D. Professor and Chief, Division of Vascular Surgery. Acting Chief, Division of Trauma and Critical Care Surgery. Chief of Staff, Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, commented: "Data from the clinical trials that supported the product's approval suggest it has the potential to be a significant advance in image-guided surgery. We look forward to the opportunity to gain experience with this exciting new technology." "We are delighted to be working with Duke and Professor Cynthia Shortell. Duke is a key luminary site for us and this is an invaluable gate-opening and validation of our Software as a Service offering". "The contract with Duke is the culmination of our efforts to establish a US presence. Installation and onboarding there represents the completion of a comprehensive evaluation process, which included IT, information security, operating room, data sharing and business approvals. We now have significant interest in our product from US physicians and hospitals alike and I expect Duke to act as springboard for our US launch in March." Lord Mervyn Davies brings commercial and international experience to the Board as both a former CEO and Chairman of Standard Chartered Bank, former Minister for Trade, Investment, Small Business and Infrastructure and as current Chairman of Corsair Capital and a Director across a diverse range of companies. Dr Franz B. Humer brings a wealth of healthcare and commercialisation experience as well as deep insights into clinical applications and health data. He is former CEO and Chairman of Roche Plc, having previously been at Glaxo and Schering Plough. James Downing brings extensive deal structuring and negotiating skills as a corporate finance specialist, and former Deputy Head of European Investment Banking at JP Morgan Chase & Co and currently as Non-Executive Director on a number of companies. Professor Deanfield brings expertise in cardiovascular imaging, large-scale clinical trials and outcomes research, both nationally and internationally. He is Professor of Cardiology at University College London and Director of the National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research (NICOR). Cydar Ltd is a private UK company established in 2012, originally a spin out from Kings College London and Guys & St Thomas' NHS trust. It has successfully completed clinical trials to gain CE Mark and FDA Clearance for its first product - Cydar EV - in 2016 and is currently being used in several UK hospitals, including The Royal Free Hospital and at Guys & St Thomas's Hospital, in London. Cydar Inc (US) is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Cydar Ltd.


INmune Bio, Inc., a cancer immunotherapy company focused on developing therapies that prime natural killer (NK) cells to attack cancer, today announces that its co-founder, Professor Mark Lowdell, PhD, FRCPath FRSB, has been named one of Europe's 10 academic-entrepreneur superstars by Labiotech, the leading digital media covering the European Biotech industry. "I was surprised and delighted to be named one of the elite academic-entrepreneurs in this field in Europe. I have been fortunate to be able to work alongside academic and commercial collaborators to develop a number of scientific discoveries that have the prospect of becoming successful therapies able to make a difference in the lives of patients," states Professor Lowdell. Professor Lowdell is the Professor of Cell & Tissue Therapy and Director of the Centre for Cell, Gene & Tissue Therapy at the Royal Free London NHS FT and University College London. He is an established leader in the development of cell and tissue medicines for immunotherapy and regenerative medicine and has been responsible for the development and delivery of multiple cell-based therapies both academically and commercially. In addition to being a co-founder of INmune Bio, Professor Lowdell is also the Company's Chief Scientific Officer and chair of the Scientific Advisory Board. Professor Lowdell is also a founder-shareholder of CellMedica Ltd. and a member of its scientific advisory board. In 2016 he became a co-founder of Achilles Therapeutics, an immunotherapy company funded by Syncona, the venture fund of the Wellcome Trust. He is a consultant to multiple biopharma companies and contract manufacturers across the field of cell and tissue therapy. Professor Lowdell holds a PhD in clinical immunology from the University of London and fellowships from the Royal College of Pathologists (immunopathology) and the Royal Society of Biology. He is the current vice president (EU- Middle East) of the International Society for Cell Therapy. Dr. RJ Tesi, MD, CEO and co-founder of INmune Bio, commented, "Mark has a rare combination of having the intellect of a consummate academic scientist as well as the knowledge of a successful entrepreneur when he looks at the practical, regulatory and technical challenges of delivering and then commercializing novel therapies from the lab bench. All of us at INmune Bio look forward to his continued insight, innovation and experience." INmune Bio's lead candidate is INKmune™, a novel biologic therapy that primes the patient's NK cells to attack their cancer. In pre-clinical studies, INKmune has been shown to attack many types of hematologic malignancies including leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma and epithelial cancers including breast, ovarian, prostate, renal and lung cancer. INmune expects to begin clinical trials of INKmune™ by year-end 2017. INmune Bio is a private clinical stage biotechnology company developing therapies for targeting the innate immune system. INmune Bio is developing INKmune™, a novel therapy that harnesses the patient's own NK cells to attack their cancer. INmune is targeting residual disease - the cancer cells that survive initial treatments that return to cause the cancer relapse which may cause death. Using a novel mechanism of action and a precision medicine approach, INKmune therapy should enhance NK cells' ability to eliminate residual disease. Labiotech is the leading digital media covering the European Biotech industry. Over 70,000 people use it monthly to keep a watch on the business and innovations of biotechnologies. Forward-looking statements: This press release contains certain "forward-looking statements." Such statements may include statements relating the leadership of the company and other statements relating to future events or to the company's future financial performance and are not historical facts, including statements which may be preceded by the words "intends," "may," "will," "plans," "expects,” "anticipates," “projects," "predicts," "estimates," "aims,” "believes," "hopes," "potential" or similar words. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and are based on certain assumptions and are subject to various known and unknown risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond the control of the company. Actual results may differ materially from the expectations contained in the forward-looking statements. More detailed information about the company and the risk factors that may affect the realization of forward-looking statements is set forth in the company's Private Placement Memorandum. The company does not undertake to publicly update or revise its forward-looking statements as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A study by researchers at the University of Southampton shows that antibiotics may be an effective treatment for acute non-complicated appendicitis in children, instead of surgery. The systematic review of existing literature is published in Pediatrics. The condition, which causes the appendix -- a small organ attached to the large intestine -- to become inflamed due to a blockage or infection, affects mainly children and teenagers. Appendicitis is currently treated through an operation to remove the appendix, known as an appendicectomy, and it is the most common cause of emergency surgery in children. The review, led by Nigel Hall, Associate Professor of Paediatric Surgery at the University of Southampton, assessed existing literature published over the past 10 years that included 10 studies reporting on 413 children who received non-operative treatment rather than an appendectomy. It shows that no study reported any safety concern or specific adverse events related to non-surgical treatment, although the rate of recurrent appendicitis was 14 per cent. Mr Hall, who is also a Consultant Paediatric and Neonatal Surgeon at Southampton Children's Hospital, commented: "Acute appendicitis is one of the most common general surgical emergencies worldwide and surgery has long been the gold standard of treatment. But it is invasive and costly, not to mention extremely daunting for the child concerned and their family. Our review shows that antibiotics could be an alternative treatment method for children. When we compared the adult literature to the data in our review it suggested that antibiotic treatment of acute appendicitis is at least as effective in children as in adults. This now needs to be explored more widely." The review says that longer term clinical outcomes and cost effectiveness of antibiotics compared to appendicectomy require further evaluation, preferably as large randomised trials to reliably inform decision making. To further this research Mr Hall and his team in Southampton, along with colleagues at St George's Hospital in Tooting, Alder Hey Children's Hospital in Liverpool and Great Ormond Street Hospital, are currently carrying out a year-long feasibility trial which will see children with appendicitis randomly allocated to have either surgery or antibiotic treatment. Mr Hall said: "In our initial trial, we will see how many patients and families are willing to join the study and will look at how well children in the study recover. "This will give us an indication of how many children we may be able to recruit into a future larger trial and how the outcomes of non-operative treatment compare with an operation." The study -- known as CONservative TReatment of Appendicitis in Children a randomised controlled Trial (CONTRACT) -- is being funded through a £483,000 grant from the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment Programme and co-ordinated by the University of Southampton's clinical trials unit in collaboration with the University of Bristol, the University of Liverpool and University College London.


News Article | February 19, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Rosalind Franklin and Ada Lovelace - among the great scientists who have paved the way for Women in STEM. But whilst these names and their passion for research may inspire women to pursue careers in the sector, there is a widespread issue in supporting women throughout their development in scientific roles. 65% of early career researchers in biomedical sciences are female, yet a huge drop off rate is reported when looking at progression to professor level with less than one in five biomedical professor positions across the research sector currently held by women. I am fortunate to be able to pursue my passion for science in my role as Reader in Renal Sciences and Honorary Consultant Nephrologist at Kings College London and King's College Hospital, whilst still having the flexibility to focus on my family, whenever they need me. It's very hard work, but also enormously rewarding. However, developing a career in science as a female is not without its challenges. Unfortunately, I think some work place processes discriminate against female employees in a completely unintentional way. For example, setting up decision-making meetings at 8am when female colleagues are on the school run - so it's harder to get involved - undoubtedly having an impact on career progression somewhere along the line. Although I've always had faith in the system and have never personally felt discriminated against, I have occasionally witnessed attitudes towards colleagues change when they return to work part time after having children. Assumptions have been made about part time workers' commitments to their jobs and change in their personal priorities, which have effectively marginalised them from being full members of the team. Attitudes like this are not appropriate, and we are working hard to discourage them through programmes such as Athena SWAN charter, run by the Equality Challenge Unit. I strongly believe we need to continue to work hard to eradicate all issues surrounding gender equality in the sector and to open up more opportunities for women across STEM based industries. There is clearly a disconnect between those entering scientific professions at entry level, and those progressing into more senior roles, so it's important that organisations look at their data to understand where the issues may lie and, more importantly, what can be done to address them. This month, Kidney Research UK, who are pleased to report a 50/50 split of male and female researchers it funds, launched a Women in Science campaign. The campaign champions all the incredible female researchers we currently have working across the industry, with an aim to inspire the next generation of girls hoping to pursue careers in science. Inspiration derives from passion and people, and I believe that mentoring is essential in supporting female research Scientists. I have had a series of influential mentors throughout my career but in the early days all my mentors were men, as there just weren't many women to choose from. It would have been nice to have had strong female characters to look up to, who perhaps had been through some of the same things as me. I have been interested in science for as long as I can remember but it was one, unexpected, comment in particular which I think drove me to turn my passion into a career. This was when my physics teacher said to me: 'girls really only do Physics A-Level as they know they will be in a class full of boys'. It turns out that this comment only made me more determined to show my teacher, and everyone else, that I was going to do things differently, but it's important to remember that young girls can be very impressionable and it's vital that they have a solid support network in place and lots of great role models to help them reach their potential. I've been lucky to have a fantastic network of people around me throughout my career including my husband, mentors, colleagues, and our nanny who provided invaluable and reliable childcare for 14 years. These factors undoubtedly helped me to shape my career and enabled me to pursue something I absolutely love. My research studies are focused on the development of renal fibrosis - the main underlying cause of kidney failure - and I hope that one day soon this work will lead to the development of new drugs which will make Chronic Kidney Disease a treatable condition. My hope is that with that with the ongoing steps being taken to resolve gender equality issues within the science industry, plus people such as myself speaking out to share personal experiences, more and more women will feel empowered and confident enough to forge a career within the industry - regardless of the hurdles which may lie ahead. Kidney Research UK is the leading UK charity committed to developing treatments, patient information and raising vital public awareness to help save lives. www.kidneyresearchuk.org


Researchers discover that experimental Alzheimer's drug causes teeth to regrow tissue lost to cavities A paper from a group of Kings College London researchers documents an unexpected and welcome side effect from an experimental anti-Alzheimer's drug called Tideglusib: test subjects experienced a regeneration of dentin, the bony part of teeth that sits between the pulp and the enamel. The drug stimulates brain-cell regeneration. But when it is applied topically to teeth, it suppressed the release of a kind of tau protein, which allowed them to sprout new stem cells, which led to the replenishment of dentin. The King’s College researchers put the enzyme inhibitor on biodegradable collagen sponges, stuck them in subjects’ teeth where cavities had formed and found they healed up without the need for any drilling or filling. “Using a drug that has already been tested in clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease provides a real opportunity to get this dental treatment quickly into clinics,” Sharpe said in a release. Promotion of natural tooth repair by small molecule GSK3 antagonists [Vitor C. M. Neves, Rebecca Babb, Dhivya Chandrasekaran & Paul T. Sharpe/Scientific Reports]

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