Collaborating Center for Campylobacter Reference Laboratory for Campylobacteriosis

Utrecht, Netherlands

Collaborating Center for Campylobacter Reference Laboratory for Campylobacteriosis

Utrecht, Netherlands

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Fitzgerald C.,Scientific-Atlanta | Fitzgerald C.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Tu Z.C.,New York University | Patrick M.,Scientific-Atlanta | And 20 more authors.
International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology | Year: 2014

A polyphasic study was undertaken to determine the taxonomic position of 13 Campylobacter fetuslike strains from humans (n=8) and reptiles (n=5). The results of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS and genomic data from sap analysis, 16S rRNA gene and hsp60 sequence comparison, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization and whole genome sequencing demonstrated that these strains are closely related to C. fetus but clearly differentiated from recognized subspecies of C. fetus. Therefore, this unique cluster of 13 strains represents a novel subspecies within the species C. fetus, for which the name Campylobacter fetus subsp. testudinum subsp. nov. is proposed, with strain 03-427T (=ATCC BAA-2539T=LMG 27499T) as the type strain. Although this novel taxon could not be differentiated from C. fetus subsp. fetus and C. fetus subsp. venerealis using conventional phenotypic tests, MALDI-TOF MS revealed the presence of multiple phenotypic biomarkers which distinguish Campylobacter fetus subsp. testudinum subsp. nov. from recognized subspecies of C. fetus. © 2014 IUMS.


Pacholewicz E.,University Utrecht | Pacholewicz E.,MEYN Food Processing Technology B.V. | Swart A.,National Institute for Public Health and the Environment | Schipper M.,National Institute for Public Health and the Environment | And 8 more authors.
International Journal of Food Microbiology | Year: 2015

The causes of differences in Campylobacter and Escherichia coli concentrations on broiler chicken carcasses after chilling between slaughterhouses are not fully identified. Therefore, it is a challenge for slaughterhouses to comply with Process Hygiene Criteria for broiler meat.The aim of the study was to identify which processing steps contribute to increases or decreases in Campylobacter and E. coli concentrations within and between two slaughterhouses. Identifying the processing steps with variable performance could explain the differences in bacterial concentrations after chilling between slaughterhouses.Thermotolerant Campylobacter and E. coli concentrations on carcasses during broiler processing were measured during the summer period in 21 trials after bleeding, scalding, defeathering, evisceration and chilling.In two slaughterhouses with comparable Campylobacter and E. coli concentrations in the incoming batches (after bleeding), the mean log10 concentrations are found to be significantly different after chilling. Campylobacter concentrations decreased by 1.40 log10 in Slaughterhouse 1 and by 1.86 log10 in Slaughterhouse 2, whereas E. coli decreased by 2.19 log10 in Slaughterhouse 1 and by 2.84 log10 in Slaughterhouse 2. Higher concentrations of Campylobacter and E. coli on carcasses after chilling were observed in Slaughterhouse 1 in which an increase in concentrations was observed after evisceration. The effect of processing on Campylobacter and E. coli concentrations in Slaughterhouse 1 did not differ between batches. In Slaughterhouse 2, the effect of processing on the concentrations of both bacteria varied over batches. Changes in E. coli concentration levels during processing were similar to Campylobacter except for defeathering. E. coli concentration significantly decreased after defeathering in both slaughterhouses, whereas Campylobacter increased in Slaughterhouse 2 and in Slaughterhouse 1 no significant changes were observed.The patterns of increases and decreases in bacterial concentrations during processing are specific for each slaughterhouse. Inhomogeneous patterns potentially explain the differences in concentrations after chilling between slaughterhouses. Critical processing steps should be validated in each slaughterhouse by longitudinal studies and potentially based on E. coli. E. coli has a potential to be used as an indicator of processing hygiene, because the impact of most of the studied processing steps was similar as for Campylobacter. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


van der Graaf-van Bloois L.,University Utrecht | van der Graaf-van Bloois L.,Collaborating Center for Campylobacter Reference Laboratory for Campylobacteriosis | Duim B.,University Utrecht | Duim B.,Collaborating Center for Campylobacter Reference Laboratory for Campylobacteriosis | And 7 more authors.
BMC Genomics | Year: 2016

Background: Campylobacter fetus (C. fetus) can cause disease in both humans and animals. C. fetus has been divided into three subspecies: C. fetus subsp. fetus (Cff), C. fetus subsp. venerealis (Cfv) and C. fetus subsp. testudinum (Cft). Subspecies identification of mammal-associated C. fetus strains is crucial in the control of Bovine Genital Campylobacteriosis (BGC), a syndrome associated with Cfv. The prescribed methods for subspecies identification of the Cff and Cfv isolates are: tolerance to 1 % glycine and H2S production. Results: In this study, we observed the deletion of a putative cysteine transporter in the Cfv strains, which are not able to produce H2S from L-cysteine. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the core genome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within Cff and Cfv strains divided these strains into five different clades and showed that the Cfv clade and a Cff clade evolved from a single Cff ancestor. Conclusions: Multiple C. fetus clades were observed, which were not consistent with the biochemical differentiation of the strains. This suggests the need for a closer evaluation of the current C. fetus subspecies differentiation, considering that the phenotypic differentiation is still applied in BGC control programs. © 2016 The Author(s).

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