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News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

NSF International, a global public health and safety organization that provides food safety and quality assurance services across all food supply chain sectors, announced the recipients of the 2017 NSF Food Safety Leadership Awards today at the 2017 Food Safety Summit in Rosemont, Illinois: 2017 NSF Food Safety Leadership Lifetime Achievement Awards: Jack J. Guzewich, MPH Consultant and Trainer in Foodborne Disease Epidemiology and Food Emergency Response NSF International’s Food Safety Leadership Awards recognize individuals and organizations for real and lasting improvements in food safety. Created in 2004, the awards encourage the development of educational programs, processes and technologies to advance food safety. Each year, an independent panel of food safety experts from academia, industry and the regulatory community reviews nominations from around the world to select the recipients. Nominations are evaluated on the basis of innovation, impact and contribution to the advancement of food safety. “These awards honor the recipients for their contributions to food safety and the protection of public health. The work of Jack Guzewich, David Theno and Lee-Ann Jaykus has contributed to important advances in food safety research, industry innovation and pathogen mitigation. Their leadership and enthusiasm in science-based research, collaboration and information sharing to help solve vital food safety issues embodies the spirit of NSF International’s Food Safety Leadership Awards,” said Kevan P. Lawlor, NSF International President and Chief Executive Officer. Lifetime Achievement Award: Jack J. Guzewich, MPH, Consultant and Trainer in Foodborne Disease Epidemiology and Food Emergency Response Over his 46-year career, Jack J. Guzewich has been a national leader in food safety regulation and the epidemiology of foodborne disease. He is a proponent of environmental assessment including root cause analysis to investigate the causes of foodborne disease outbreaks and food contamination events. Much of his career was spent on investigations to understand how food becomes contaminated with foodborne pathogens and the ecology of pathogens in various environments. Mr. Guzewich directed the New York State Department of Health’s food safety program for 17 years and created the Foodborne Disease Surveillance System (FBDS), an extensive database of reported foodborne disease outbreaks including their contributing factors. FBDS was one of the first systems of its kind and served as a precursor to today’s National Outbreak Reporting System. Mr. Guzewich guided the adoption of New York’s regulation to prohibit bare-hand contact with ready-to-eat foods and worked to include these provisions in the FDA Food Code. He was instrumental in documenting gastroenteritis and Salmonella enteritidis outbreaks associated with shellfish and shelled eggs, respectively, by identifying trends and developing interventions to prevent future outbreaks. As a result, control recommendations implemented by New York under his leadership led to national improvements as provided in the 2009 Egg Safety Final Rule. At the FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Mr. Guzewich created and led the Center’s Emergency Coordination and Response program with a strong emphasis on prevention and control of foodborne disease. He developed the FDA procedures for investigating produce farms implicated in outbreaks or contamination events to identify the root causes of contamination, which required an environmental assessment versus a routine inspection. He worked very closely with the CDC’s Environmental Health Specialist Network to help develop the National Environmental Assessment Reporting System which is used by several states to help identify the root causes of foodborne disease outbreaks. He was also instrumental in developing the publication Procedures to Investigate Foodborne Illness and contributed to the first editions of Guidelines for Foodborne Disease Outbreak Response and Guidelines for Foodborne Disease Outbreak Response – Toolkit. “Jack Guzewich is the epitome of a food safety leader,” says Dale L. Morse, MD, Associate Director for Food Safety, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases, CDC. “His career was built on hard work, innovative creation of foodborne illness surveillance networks and databases, application of these networks to identify causes and initiate long-term control recommendations, and educational pursuits to train the next generation of food safety leaders.” Lifetime Achievement Award: David M. Theno, Ph.D., CEO/CBIO, Gray Dog Partners, Inc. Throughout his 40-year career, Dr. David M. Theno’s work set new standards for food safety leadership and management in food production and in the foodservice industry. He has been instrumental in demonstrating how the scientific community and the meat/food industry can work together to solve food safety challenges. Dr. Theno installed the first Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) program in an animal protein production plant while at Foster Farms in the mid-1980s. His work in the early 1990s at Jack in the Box is widely credited with setting new standards for food safety leadership and management in all aspects of food production. After an Escherichia coli (E. coli) 0157:H7 infection of the chain’s burgers caused a foodborne illness outbreak in the Pacific Northwest, he developed the first comprehensive food safety management plan for a foodservice chain. He also implemented a finished ground beef testing protocol, a comprehensive supply chain auditing system and a “test and hold” protocol for ground beef that is now an industry standard. This management program resulted in a significant reduction of foodborne illness outbreaks in the foodservice industry, and all major foodservice chain organizations today have implemented a food safety management plan based on this program. Serving as a member of the USDA’s National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods, Dr. Theno was instrumental in changing the way the USDA and the industry look at food safety. He played an essential role in helping guide the beef industry’s research activities to better understand E. coli O157, and helped form the Beef Industry Food Safety Council, which develops and updates food safety practices that are critical for the food industry. Dr. Theno is one of the original authors of the HACCP guidance issued by FDA and USDA/FSIS that is in place today, and has authored numerous scientific and trade publication articles. “David Theno’s leadership through the E. coli outbreaks in the 1990s set the stage for the entire industry to come together in a non-competitive, collaborative effort to employ science-based solutions to tackle emerging pathogenic threats,” says Thomas H. Powell, Ph.D., CAE, Executive Director, American Meat Science Association. “Dr. Theno led the effort to identify and implement viable interventions and spurred research into new intervention strategies. His greatest impact was his unswerving dedication to protecting the consumer and his complete transparency with other industry food safety leaders. He freely shared the valuable insights he gained through the fiery trials on the front lines of the early outbreaks.” Dr. Lee-Ann Jaykus has over 30 years’ experience advancing the science of food safety through applied infection prevention and control science, especially regarding norovirus. She has collaborated on many large, multi-institutional projects on foodborne pathogens and food virology, including developing methods to detect human enteric virus contamination in foods and environmental samples, and better understanding the dynamics of virus transmission through the food chain. She serves as the Scientific Director of the USDA-NIFA Food Virology Collaborative (NoroCORE), a team of 30-plus scientists representing 18 academic and government institutions working to develop improved tools, skills and capacity to understand and control foodborne virus disease risks. Under Dr. Jaykus’ direction, NoroCORE has worked closely with companies, trade organizations, government regulators and public health entities to identify and address the most important food virology problems, and translate results into real-world processes and actions. These include cultivating human norovirus which had eluded scientists for 50 years, developing a risk-modeling program for tracking norovirus that can calculate disease risk and screen strategies for managing contamination in food service and health care facilities, confirming that alcohol-based hand sanitizers cannot completely inactivate norovirus and working to modify FDA Food Code recommendations to facilitate norovirus control. In her academic career, Dr. Jaykus has taught graduate and undergraduate courses in food microbiology and safety, mentored over 30 graduate students and post-doctoral research associates, and authored over 150 publications. “I have never met a scientist or food safety professional as enthusiastic and competent as Dr. Jaykus is in defining the issues, developing key needs, initiating the means to fill gaps and translating findings quickly into industry applications,” says Hal King, Ph.D., President/CEO of Public Health Innovations LLC. “Her work will lead to improved methods to prevent norovirus foodborne disease infections around the world, and she has elevated our nation’s food safety competencies across all sectors of the food chain.” Editor’s note: For more information on the NSF Food Safety Leadership Awards or to schedule an interview with an NSF International food safety expert, contact Liz Nowland-Margolis at media(at)nsf.org or +1 734-418-6624. About NSF International: NSF International (nsf.org) is a global independent organization that writes standards, and tests and certifies products for the food, water and consumer goods industries to minimize adverse health effects and protect the environment. Founded in 1944, NSF is committed to protecting human health and safety worldwide. NSF International is a Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization Collaborating Center on Food Safety, Water Quality and Indoor Environment. NSF International provides expertise and accredited food services across all supply chain sectors, including agriculture, animal feed and welfare, produce, processing, distribution, dairy, seafood, quality management software, retail and restaurants. Services include Global Food Safety Initiative, foodservice equipment and nonfood compounds certification, HACCP validation and inspection, label claims verification and certification, DNA and food package testing, product and process development, food fraud consulting and training, and organic and Certified Transitional certification through Quality Assurance International (QAI).


Use of the generic versions of directly-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs that are available in India to treat hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is not only cost effective but actually saves lifetime costs for treating infected patients in that country. A report from an international research team appears in the open-access journal PLOS ONE and describes finding that the upfront costs of DAA are offset by the avoidance of costs incurred to treat late-stage disease. "More than 9 million people are infected with HCV in India, and more than 70 million worldwide," says Jagpreet Chhatwal, PhD, of the Institute for Technology Assessment at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), senior and corresponding author of the paper. "These persons are at risk of developing serious conditions such as cirrhosis and liver cancer, which can be fatal. However, only a fraction of them have been treated with these drugs so far." First introduced in 2011, DAAs such as sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) and ledipasvir (which is combined with sofosbuvir in Harvoni) have proven to be remarkably successful in the battle against HCV infection, with cure rates exceeding 95 percent. In developed countries, treatment with DAAs is very expensive -- reaching nearly $65,000 in the U.S. -- although it meets standards for cost effectiveness. In those countries the advent of these drugs has drastically changed the landscape of HCV infection. But other countries have lagged behind in their use. Through agreements with the pharmaceutical companies that developed these drugs, generic drug manufacturers in India are now able to produce versions that cost as little as $300 for the entire duration of treatment. But the absence of data on the cost effectiveness of these drugs in that country and low budgets for HCV treatment have meant that only a small proportion of people needing these drugs have received them. The research team -- including investigators from Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences in Lucknow, India, and the World Health Organization - used a mathematical model to compare the outcomes of DAA treatment with those of no DAA treatment based on profiles of 30 hypothetical patients with characteristics typical of Indian patients with HCV infection. Factors incorporated into the model included the natural history of HCV disease, the costs of DAA administration, the costs of treating the adverse outcomes of HCV disease, and quality of life of individuals infected with HCV. The model indicated that, compared with no DAA treatment, use of the generic drugs in HCV-infected Indian patients would increase life expectancy by more than eight years while reducing lifetime health care costs by more than $1,300 per person. Payback for the upfront costs of DAA drugs would be achieved in an overall average of less than 10 years - under 5 years for patients at advanced stages of HCV disease and almost 12 years if treatment begins at earlier stages. Even though there was wide variation in the factors -- such as patient age, disease stage, and viral genotype - input to the model, results always indicated that generic DAA treatment reduced lifetime costs. "Our hypothesis was that treatment would be cost saving, given the low drug costs in India. However, we were pleasantly surprised to find that the full payback was achieved so soon after treatment," says Chhatwal, who is an assistant professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School. "Our finding that treatment pays back its initial costs makes a very strong statement - that investment in HCV screening and treatment should be a priority for public health agencies in India and other countries where generic DAAs are available. It could also be argued that generic DAAs should be made available in other low- and middle-income countries where HCV infection is common and budgets for treatment limited." Lead author Rakesh Aggarwal, MD, DM, of the Department of Gastroenterology at Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences (SGPGIMS), a WHO Collaborating Center on Viral Hepatitis, says, "This is a win-win situation for the low- and low-middle-income countries where the generic DAAs can be sold. If these countries spend money on HCV treatment today, they will recoup it in the form of reduced health care expenditure within less than one decade. There is hardly any other health care intervention with such good return. Our results should show political leaders in those countries that they have a wonderful opportunity to make a difference for their constituents." Additional co-authors PLOS ONE paper are Qiushi Chen, PhD, MGH Institute of Technology Assessment; Amit Goel, MD, DM, SGPGIMS; Nicole Seguy, MD, MPH, and Razia Pendse, MD, MPH, World Health Organization; and Turgay Ayer, PhD, Georgia Institute of Technology. Massachusetts General Hospital, founded in 1811, is the original and largest teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School. The MGH Research Institute conducts the largest hospital-based research program in the nation, with an annual research budget of more than $800 million and major research centers in HIV/AIDS, cardiovascular research, cancer, computational and integrative biology, cutaneous biology, genomic medicine, medical imaging, neurodegenerative disorders, regenerative medicine, reproductive biology, systems biology, photomedicine and transplantation biology. The MGH topped the 2015 Nature Index list of health care organizations publishing in leading scientific journals and earned the prestigious 2015 Foster G. McGaw Prize for Excellence in Community Service. In August 2016 the MGH was once again named to the Honor Roll in the U.S. News & World Report list of "America's Best Hospitals."


Use of the generic versions of directly-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs that are available in India to treat hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is not only cost effective but actually saves lifetime costs for treating infected patients in that country. A report from an international research team appears in the open-access journal PLOS ONE and describes finding that the upfront costs of DAA are offset by the avoidance of costs incurred to treat late-stage disease. "More than 9 million people are infected with HCV in India, and more than 70 million worldwide," says Jagpreet Chhatwal, PhD, of the Institute for Technology Assessment at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), senior and corresponding author of the paper. "These persons are at risk of developing serious conditions such as cirrhosis and liver cancer, which can be fatal. However, only a fraction of them have been treated with these drugs so far." First introduced in 2011, DAAs such as sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) and ledipasvir (which is combined with sofosbuvir in Harvoni) have proven to be remarkably successful in the battle against HCV infection, with cure rates exceeding 95 percent. In developed countries, treatment with DAAs is very expensive -- reaching nearly $65,000 in the U.S. -- although it meets standards for cost effectiveness. In those countries the advent of these drugs has drastically changed the landscape of HCV infection. But other countries have lagged behind in their use. Through agreements with the pharmaceutical companies that developed these drugs, generic drug manufacturers in India are now able to produce versions that cost as little as $300 for the entire duration of treatment. But the absence of data on the cost effectiveness of these drugs in that country and low budgets for HCV treatment have meant that only a small proportion of people needing these drugs have received them. The research team -- including investigators from Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences in Lucknow, India, and the World Health Organization -- used a mathematical model to compare the outcomes of DAA treatment with those of no DAA treatment based on profiles of 30 hypothetical patients with characteristics typical of Indian patients with HCV infection. Factors incorporated into the model included the natural history of HCV disease, the costs of DAA administration, the costs of treating the adverse outcomes of HCV disease, and quality of life of individuals infected with HCV. The model indicated that, compared with no DAA treatment, use of the generic drugs in HCV-infected Indian patients would increase life expectancy by more than eight years while reducing lifetime health care costs by more than $1,300 per person. Payback for the upfront costs of DAA drugs would be achieved in an overall average of less than 10 years -- under 5 years for patients at advanced stages of HCV disease and almost 12 years if treatment begins at earlier stages. Even though there was wide variation in the factors -- such as patient age, disease stage, and viral genotype -- input to the model, results always indicated that generic DAA treatment reduced lifetime costs. "Our hypothesis was that treatment would be cost saving, given the low drug costs in India. However, we were pleasantly surprised to find that the full payback was achieved so soon after treatment," says Chhatwal, who is an assistant professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School. "Our finding that treatment pays back its initial costs makes a very strong statement -- that investment in HCV screening and treatment should be a priority for public health agencies in India and other countries where generic DAAs are available. It could also be argued that generic DAAs should be made available in other low- and middle-income countries where HCV infection is common and budgets for treatment limited." Lead author Rakesh Aggarwal, MD, DM, of the Department of Gastroenterology at Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences (SGPGIMS), a WHO Collaborating Center on Viral Hepatitis, says, "This is a win-win situation for the low- and low-middle-income countries where the generic DAAs can be sold. If these countries spend money on HCV treatment today, they will recoup it in the form of reduced health care expenditure within less than one decade. There is hardly any other health care intervention with such good return. Our results should show political leaders in those countries that they have a wonderful opportunity to make a difference for their constituents."


BOSTON, Nov. 3, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/-- JSI Research & Training Institute (JSI), in partnership with the World Health Organization Collaborating Center and the National Implementation Research Network at the University of North Carolina, is pleased to announce the Family...


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Hankscraft, Inc. has earned certification to NSF/ANSI 42 and 53, American National Standards for drinking water treatment systems, for its Elements Bluefilters models UF-5-BF and UF-5-BF-NF from global public health organization NSF International. The systems are now certified to filter microbiologic impurities and remove undesired taste and odors. Hankscraft Elements’ Bluefilters UF 5 Ultra-filtration System has 5 stages of filtration, including a heavy duty sediment pre-filter, activated carbon/KDF filter, ultra-filtration cartridge, inline activated carbon filter, and a bio-ceramic resonator cartridge. The system works using existing household water pressure and is able to remove impurities such as inorganic chemicals, algae and other common contaminants down to .01 micron. It also effectively removes parasites such as Cyst, Cryptosporidium, Toxoplasma, Giardia, and Entamoeba. The UF 5 is easy to install and fits conveniently under the sink for continuous clean water throughout the home. NSF International led the development of the American National Standards for all materials/products coming into contact with drinking water. Today, government agencies around the world utilize NSF International standards to verify the safety and performance of various types of water treatment devices, as well as other water contact products, like treatment chemicals, pipes and plumbing components, to ensure these products do not leach harmful levels of contaminants into drinking water. To earn certification to NSF/ANSI 42 and 53: Drinking Water Treatment Units, Hankscraft’s models were subject to rigorous testing, including material safety, structural integrity and evaluation of total dissolved solids (TDS) reduction. This standard was created to address the specific technologies and product specifications related to reverse osmosis systems. “By achieving NSF certification to NSF/ANSI 42 and 53 for its reverse osmosis system, Hankscraft has proven its commitment to public health and safety,” said Tina Yerkes, NSF International’s General Manager of Global Filtration Products. “NSF International certification verifies that their models will not leach specific harmful contaminants into drinking water, are structurally sound and perform as claimed.” To see all contaminant reduction claims and Hankscraft’s official NSF listing for this device, please visit their official NSF certification listing. “Hankscraft is proud to earn NSF/ANSI 42 and 53 certification for our cutting-edge Elements Bluefilters UF 5 system and we are able to offer this product at a time when so many people need a reliable, high-performance under-sink filtration system to make their water safe to drink and use in the kitchen”, says Bob Kappel, Director of Hankscraft H2O Products. “The Elements Bluefilters UF 5 system has no equal in the industry and offers superior performance and reliability for the average homeowner who questions the quality of the water from their faucet, but is troubled by the environmental impact and expense of buying bottled water. The Elements Bluefilters UF 5 system truly represents an economical, environmentally-friendly way to deliver clean, safe drinking water to you and your family.” For more information on the details and requirements of NSF certification, please visit NSF International’s website. About Hankscraft, Inc.: Founded in Madison, Wisconsin in 1920, Hankscraft Inc. is privately held with over 300 employees worldwide who, guided by their mission and values, provide customers around the world with a wide range of products and services through five distinct divisions. Hankscraft launched the H2O Products Division in 2000 when the company began manufacturing softener valve motors for one of the largest water treatment companies in the world. In 2005, Hankscraft began providing replacement parts for these industry-standard valves, which quickly evolved into providing entire valves and systems in 2009. Today, the H2O Product Division offers a full line of water treatment systems, valves and replacement parts. About NSF International: NSF International is a global independent organization that writes standards and protocols, and tests and certifies products for the food, water and consumer goods industries to minimize adverse health effects and protect the environment. Founded in 1944, NSF is a Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization Collaborating Center on Food Safety, Water Quality and Indoor Environment. The NSF Water Division provides testing, certification and auditing for municipal water treatment components and chemicals, plastic piping systems, plumbing fixtures and fittings, point-of-use and point-of-entry water systems and filters, and pool and spa equipment and chemicals. NSF international led the development of the American National Standards for all materials and products that treat or come in contact with drinking water to help protect public health and the environment and minimize adverse health effects.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

NSF International, a global public health and safety organization, today announced the retirement of Bob Pietrowski, Ph.D., a 40-year veteran of the pharmaceutical and medical device industries who has served as Vice President of NSF International’s Global Health Sciences Division since 2013. Martin Lush, who previously led NSF International’s pharma biotech business, will be appointed Global Vice President of NSF Pharma Biotech and Medical Devices based near York, UK. In this role, Lush will design and execute the business strategy for NSF International’s global pharmaceutical, biotech and medical device services, reporting to Lori Bestervelt, Ph.D., Executive Vice President & Chief Technical Officer of NSF International. Bestervelt will oversee the organization’s dietary supplement, beverage quality, and cosmetics and personal care products certification and GMP services. “Bob Pietrowski’s character, expertise and leadership are unparalleled in the global health sciences industries,” said Kevan P. Lawlor, CEO and President of NSF International. “He has been an important part of our organization’s growth during the last decade. His impact on NSF International and the industry will be felt for many years to come.” “Bob’s vast knowledge and extensive experience in biologicals and biotech manufacturing has been invaluable to NSF International and our teams involved in R&D, quality control and product management,” Dr. Bestervelt said. “He has been a trusted colleague, leader, mentor and friend to so many of us. We wish him well in his retirement.” Dr. Pietrowski’s official retirement date is January 31, 2017. He joined NSF International in 2007 to lead the organization’s training, auditing and consulting programs for the pharmaceutical and medical device industries. In 2013, he was named Vice President of NSF International’s Health Sciences Division reporting to Bestervelt and serving the pharmaceutical, biotech, medical device, dietary supplement, cosmetics and beverage industries. Under his leadership, Health Sciences became NSF International’s fastest growing division consistently year after year. Prior to NSF International, Dr. Pietrowski served as Managing Partner of the pharmaceutical/biotech consultancy David Begg Associates near York, UK, which NSF International acquired in 2007. His career in the pharmaceutical, biotech and medical device industries dates back to the 1970s. Martin Lush has been appointed Global Vice President of NSF Pharma Biotech and Medical Devices, also reporting to Bestervelt. A veteran of the pharmaceutical and biotech industries, Lush currently leads NSF International’s pharma biotech services. Previously, he served as a Senior Partner at the pharmaceutical/biotech consultancy David Begg Associates near York, UK, which NSF International acquired in 2007. Additionally, Lush has worked for several pharmaceutical manufacturing firms, holding senior leadership positions in the areas of quality assurance, quality control, development, supply chain, corporate auditing and governance. He is certified as a Qualified Person in the European Union (EU). During his career, Lush has helped educate regulatory inspectors from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the UK’s Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), the World Health Organization and seven other regulatory agencies. His areas of expertise include human error prevention, behavioral change, aseptic manufacture and biotechnology products and processes, and he has helped design, build and validate 18 sterile processing manufacturing plants. In addition to his leadership role at NSF International, Lush is actively involved in pharmaceutical consultancy, education, remediation prevention and support, and due diligence. “Not only does Martin have years of direct industry experience in a variety of key roles, he has a passion for quality – modernizing attitudes about quality, creating cultures of quality and developing systems to help clients prepare for the future,” Lawlor said. “With experience in more than 55 countries on five continents, he is truly a global thought leader in the health sciences.” “I think we can expect great things from Martin Lush, who brings unique talents and expertise to this important leadership role,” Dr. Bestervelt said. “We’ve all benefited from Martin’s deep knowledge of the pharmaceutical/biotech industries and I look forward to working with him, and learning from him, in the years to come.” Editor’s Note: For more information or interviews, contact Liz Nowland-Margolis at media(at)nsf(dot)org or +1 734.418.6624. About NSF International: NSF International is a global independent organization that writes standards, and tests and certifies products for the water, food, health sciences and consumer goods industries to minimize adverse health effects and protect the environment (nsf.org). Founded in 1944, NSF is committed to protecting human health and safety worldwide. Operating in more than 165 countries, NSF International is a Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center on Food Safety, Water Quality and Indoor Environment.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

NSF International, a global public health organization, has launched a certification program for light fixtures intended for use in controlled environments. The new protocol, NSF P442: Controlled Environment Light Fixtures, offers clients the ability to demonstrate through a single certification that their light fixtures are constructed in a way that enables them to be used in controlled environments where low air pollutant levels, cleanability, durability and structural integrity are critical. These environments may include pharmaceutical processing, biotech research, biosafety laboratories, surgical suites, clean room manufacturing, food processing and horticulture. Prior to the development of NSF P442, lighting manufacturers had to either generate their own test data or use multiple test organizations to obtain the data required to fully demonstrate the safety of their products. Certification to NSF P442: Controlled Environment Light Fixtures incorporates three different tests into one independent, third-party certification, saving manufacturers time and money. “NSF International developed the protocol with industry input in response to an industry need for a single certification for light fixtures used in controlled environments,” said Maren Roush, Business Unit Manager, Biosafety Cabinetry Program, NSF International. “NSF P442: Controlled Environment Light Fixtures integrates a variety of tests that were previously used by lighting manufacturers to demonstrate the safety of their products for use in controlled environments. NSF International performs this single-step, independent certification to verify the design, construction and performance of light fixtures that are intended for use in controlled environments such as surgery suites, clean room manufacturing, biosafety labs and pharmaceutical processing.” NSF International uses a consensus-based process in developing certifications and protocols that includes input from industry stakeholders and manufacturers. In addition to certifying lighting for controlled environments, NSF International also offers a Biosafety Cabinet Field Certifier Accreditation Program and certifies to NSF/ANSI 49: Biosafety Cabinetry, which establishes requirements for the design, construction and performance of biosafety cabinets. The standard applies to Class II biosafety cabinets, which provide environmental and product protection for work and employees involved in procedures assigned to biosafety levels 1, 2, 3 and 4. Editor’s Note: To schedule an interview with Maren Roush, Business Unit Manager, Biosafety Cabinetry, NSF International, contact Liz Nowland-Margolis at media(at)nsf(dot)org or +1 734.418.6624. NSF International is a global independent organization that writes standards, and tests and certifies products for the water, food, health sciences and consumer goods industries to minimize adverse health effects and protect the environment (nsf.org). Founded in 1944, NSF is committed to protecting human health and safety worldwide. Operating in more than 165 countries, NSF International is a Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center on Food Safety, Water Quality and the Environment.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

NSF International and ISMS Solutions are expanding their partnership to help organizations successfully attain the requirements of multiple information security standards through a single service. This partnership offers organizations full-service information security consulting and verification services. In order to conduct business with the federal government, federal contractors are required to meet numerous standards and requirements. These requirements now include multiple information security standards and guidelines. Additionally, many private organizations are voluntarily adopting these same information security requirements to ensure the safety of their supply chains, consumer databases, brand images and intellectual property assets. NSF International and ISMS Solutions have partnered to expand their service offerings. These services include a proprietary software platform, on-site consulting and cutting-edge technology that help organizations develop, implement and verify compliance with the multiple information security requirements and platforms they seek to meet. “In evolving business practices, sending data and information that can be proprietary or sensitive to organizations is becoming more commonplace, which increases the potential for added security risks,” said Tom Chestnut, Senior Vice President, NSF International. “The strength in the partnership between NSF International and ISMS Solutions is that businesses and organizations can receive full-service information security consulting, implementation and verification services from two trusted organizations through a single service.” NSF International and ISMS Solutions originally partnered to create NSF Conformance Works, the first risk and compliance tool designed to help organizations and their supply chains assess their conformance to the new requirements of the revised quality standard, ISO 9001:2015. “ISMS Solutions and NSF International are leaders in their industries, making this expansion a great asset to companies looking to verify that they meet information security standards,” said Jason Clark, Chief Executive Officer of ISMS Solutions. “Our partnership provides organizations expertise in consulting and compliance to multiple information security requirements.” For more information on these security systems services, NSF Conformance Works or the partnership between NSF International and ISMS Solutions, visit http://www.nsf.org or contact Kevin Hall at conformanceworks(at)nsf(dot)org. Editor’s Note: Media interested in more information can contact Liz Nowland-Margolis at media(at)nsf(dot)org or +1 734-418-6624. About NSF International: NSF International is a global independent organization that writes standards, and tests and certifies products for the water, food, health sciences and consumer goods industries to minimize adverse health effects and protect the environment (nsf.org). Founded in 1944, NSF is committed to protecting human health and safety worldwide. Operating in more than 165 countries, NSF International is a Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center on Food Safety, Water Quality and Indoor Environment. About ISMS Solutions: ISMS Solutions is the only management consulting firm that employs a holistic, organized approach to addressing governance, risk management, and compliance (GRC) strategy and implementation. The ISMS Solutions team of compliance experts collaborate with clients to customize, implement and automate standards and processes that meet or exceed international certification standards set by many of the standard organizations. With our proprietary SaaS platform, Conformance Works, clients can easily and seamlessly manage customized risk and compliance initiatives across their organizations, as well as their vendors and other associated companies.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Food Logistics, the only publication exclusively dedicated to covering the movement of product through the global food supply chain, has named TraQtion, a supply chain quality and compliance software developed by NSF International, drawing on its nearly 70 years of food safety expertise, to its 2016 FL100+ Top Software and Technology Providers list. The TraQtion online software service manages food safety, quality and compliance for supply chains, products and sites. The FL100+ Top Software and Technology Providers list serves as a resource guide of software and technology providers whose products and services are critical for companies in the global food and beverage supply chain. “The software and technology sector continues to generate new and exciting opportunities for growers, food manufacturers, grocery retailers and the many logistics providers that support them,” notes Lara L. Sowinski, editorial director at Food Logistics. “Today’s cloud-based solutions like TraQtion and mobile connectivity are helping create tools that are more flexible, affordable and responsive, making software and technology even more valuable to those in the global food supply chain.” “Food safety and quality professionals’ must keep track of numerous data points originating from multiple sources to maintain compliance to safety and quality requirements,” said Sireesha Mandava, Senior Director, TraQtion. “We are honored that Food Logistics has selected TraQtion as one of its top 100 software and technology providers. As a cloud-based quality and compliance software, TraQtion allows a business to build a solution that works seamlessly with its current processes and procedures by integrating with other internal and external systems for a smooth flow of information,” Mandava continued. “Each solution has a wide range of modules to handle supplier, product and site compliance, allowing businesses to choose the depth and breadth of quality and compliance needed for their brand.” Companies on this year’s FL100+ Top Software and Technology Providers list are profiled in the November/December 2016 issue of Food Logistics, http://www.foodlogistics.com. For an overview of TraQtion, please visit the website. For more information about TraQtion for current or prospective clients, please contact info(at)TraQtion(dot)com or Andrew Thorne at athorne(at)traqtion(dot)com or +1-734-645-6790. For media inquiries, please contact Liz Nowland-Margolis at lnowlandmargolis(at)nsf(dot)org or +1-734-418-6624 About Food Logistics Food Logistics is published by AC Business Media, a business-to-business media company that provides targeted content and comprehensive, integrated advertising and promotion opportunities for some of the world’s most recognized B2B brands. Its diverse portfolio serves the construction, logistics, supply chain and other industries with print, digital and custom products, events and social media. About TraQtion: TraQtion is a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) solution that manages food safety, quality and compliance for supply chains, products and sites. Developed from the ground up using NSF International's food safety and quality expertise, TraQtion serves leading manufacturers, retailers and restaurants around the world that place a high emphasis on customer satisfaction and safety. TraQtion is headquartered in Ann Arbor, Michigan and is a wholly owned subsidiary of NSF International (traqtion.com). About NSF International: Founded in 1944, NSF International is committed to protecting human health and safety worldwide. Operating in more than 165 countries, NSF is a Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization Collaborating Center on Food Safety, Water Quality and Indoor Environment. NSF is a global independent organization that writes standards, and tests and certifies products for the water, food, health sciences and consumer goods industries to minimize adverse health effects and protect the environment (nsf.org).


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

(PRWEB) January 18, 2017 -- Global public health organization NSF International has certified the first drinking water pitcher to reduce arsenic V (pentavalent arsenic) to NSF/ANSI 53: Drinking Water Treatment Units – Health Effects, an American National Standard for drinking water treatment units. This certification verifies that MicroCeramics’ NanoNose Pitcher Filter System filters the water to reduce arsenic to at or below the health advisory levels set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) of 10 parts per billion (ppb). NSF International also certified the Midea-NanoNose filtration cartridge, which houses the NanoNose filtration technology for pour-through water filters, to NSF/ANSI 53. Most arsenic enters the drinking water supply either from natural deposits in the earth or from industrial and agricultural pollution. According to the WHO, more than 200 million people worldwide might be chronically exposed to arsenic in drinking water. Long-term exposure can lead to chronic arsenic poisoning and to certain cancers. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has been ranking arsenic in first place on its toxic substance priority list for more than 16 years.* “Arsenic in drinking water threatens public health worldwide,” said Liangjie Dong, CEO of San Jose-based Mesofilter Inc. and NanoNose inventor. “The technology was researched, developed and refined over a period of 12 years at the University of Hawaii with the collaboration of China Medical University in Shenyang, China. We are so pleased to be able to offer the NanoNose Pitcher Filter System certified by NSF International. We will continue to innovate next-generation water filtration technology and products in our Silicon Valley headquarters.” Certification to NSF/ANSI 53: Drinking Water Treatment Units – Health Effects means that the product reduces pentavalent arsenic (or arsenic V) in drinking water to at or below 10 ppb and has been tested to ensure the safety of materials which come in contact with drinking water. Certification also includes annual facility audits of the manufacturing facility to ensure the products continue to meet the standard. “NSF International continues to protect and improve public health by certifying products worldwide that help improve the quality of drinking water,” said Clif McLellan, Vice President of Water Systems at NSF International. “NSF’s certification of the NanoNose Pitcher Filter System and Midea-NanoNose filtration cartridge to the NSF/ANSI 53 means consumers now have a verified solution to reduce pentavalent arsenic (or arsenic V) in their drinking water to 10 ppb which is set by the EPA and WHO.” NSF International offers a listing of all certified products including the NanoNose Pitcher Filter System. For more information on NSF International’s global filtration programs, contact Tina Yerkes, Director, General Manager, Water Systems at tyerkes(at)nsf(dot)org or call +1-734-418-6596. Editor’s note: For media interested in more information or to request an interview please contact Liz Nowland-Margolis at media(at)nsf(dot)org or +1 734-418-6624. For interviews with Mr. Dong in the San Francisco Bay Area and Silicon Valley, please contact Shirley Gines at sgines(at)firebrandglobal(dot)com or +1 858-395-0888. NSF International is a global independent organization that writes standards, and tests and certifies products for the water, food, health sciences and consumer goods industries to minimize adverse health effects and protect the environment (nsf.org). Founded in 1944, NSF is committed to protecting human health and safety worldwide. Operating in more than 165 countries, NSF International is a Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center on Food Safety, Water Quality and Indoor Environment. NSF International led the development of the American National Standards for all materials and products that treat or come in contact with drinking water. In 1990, the U.S. EPA replaced its own drinking water product advisory program with these NSF standards. Today, most major plumbing codes require certification to NSF standards for pipes and plumbing components in commercial and residential buildings. MicroCeramics LTD, headquartered in Nanopolis, Suzhou, China, manufactures the first-generation MicroNose and second-generation NanoNose products for solving arsenic and heavy metal filtration challenges in water. The third-generation technology, MesoNose, will be manufactured in San Jose, California. *Reference links for WHO and ATSDR World health Organization (WHO): http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/92/8/13-128496/en/

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