San Diego, CA, United States
San Diego, CA, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 499.97K | Year: 2015

This program will determine whether it is possible to obtain high quality EEG from pilots in realistic in-flight pilot induced oscillation (PIO) simulations and to show that actionable data exists in the acquired data for the purpose of detecting and ultimately preventing PIOs.


Patent
Cognionics | Date: 2013-03-15

A transducer assembly including a support terminal and at least one probe extending from the support terminal is adapted to enable a transducer to penetrate and slide through patches of hair covering a subject area of a person. The probe includes at least one leg structure supporting a transducer disposed at the distal end of the leg structure for sensing or stimulating the state of a particular property of a selected subject area when the transducer is applied by the leg structure to the selected subject area. The leg structure is so disposed in relation to the support terminal as to be disposed at a non-perpendicular angle to the subject area when the transducer assembly is applied to the selected subject area. The leg structure is adapted to flex when the transducer is applied under pressure to the selected subject area to thereby cause the transducer to slide on the subject area.


An assembly for reducing motion artifacts that includes an opening on the face of the assembly, an elastic material at least partially covering the opening for suspending objects above the opening, and a sensor attached to the elastic material wherein the sensor is suspended over the opening so that the sensor may be moved in the direction of the opening so that it at least partially recesses into the opening when the sensor is positioned against a subject. The tension on the elastic material generates a force on the sensor directed towards the subject as the elastic material is stretched. Methods and systems of reducing motion artifacts including methods and systems using the assembly are also claimed.


Electrode impedances on a body of a subject are measured by connecting a sense electrode, a reference electrode and a return electrode to the body, using the sense electrode to deliver a test current from a current source to the body of the subject, and measuring the potential difference between the sense electrode and the reference electrode. The impedance of the sense electrode on the body is measured in accordance with the measurement of the potential difference between the sense electrode and the reference electrode.


A biopotential electrode for transferring electrical signals with a subject that includes an electrical conductor, a membrane selectively permeable to ionic conduction for presenting a dry surface to the subject, and a conductive medium positioned in communication with a portion of the electrical conductor and a portion of the membrane. The electrical potentials are coupled from the subject across the membrane into the conductive medium and then transferred from the subject to the electrical conductor. In other embodiments, the electrical potentials may be transferred from the external conductor to the subject through the conductive medium across the membrane into the subject. Other embodiments include systems and methods for using the biopotential electrodes.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1000.00K | Year: 2014

This SBIR project is designed to meet the demand for more accessible EEG devices by providing anyone - neuroscientists, entrepreneurs, hackers, students and the general public - the first complete system, that enables reliable acquisition and advanced pro


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2013

This project will develop a proof of principle prototype for an advanced EEG system at a price point comparable to current'consumer'devices. The portable, wireless EEG headset will support both a simple, easy-to-use water based electrode and Cognionics'new flexible dry electrode. The cap will automatically position the electrodes into the International 10-20 standard and the electronics will support simultaneous recording from all sensors. With conventional EEG designs, implementing such a feature set is prohibitively expensive. However, with Cognionics'innovations in electronics, it is possible to construct an inexpensive EEG headset with a feature set and signal quality comparable to research and medical-grade devices. Unlike many current EEG systems, the Cognionics system will be designed to output unencrypted raw EEG via a standard Bluetooth interface that will allow researchers and developers to build custom applications around the headset. In Phase I, the core headset and electronics will be designed, constructed and evaluated. A simple app with visualization to demonstrate end-to-end connectivity will be created. The cost of mass production will be computed and verified to meet a ~$30 BOM.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 79.92K | Year: 2013

This project will develop a wireless, body-worn neurophysiological monitoring suite. The system comprises of multiple'patches'designed to cover the body for ECG, EEG and EMG acquisition along with auxiliary sensors for temperature and motion capture. The core of the Phase I project will focus on demonstrating the feasibility of the device for EEG and evoked applications due to the high technical challenge and stringent signal quality requirements compared to the'simpler'ECG and EMG modes. A prototype EEG system will be built that consists of a slim and unobtrusive patch covering the scalp positions Fp1, Fp2, C3, Cz, C4, O1, O2, A1 and A2. Novel sensor designs will be evaluated to enable high quality recordings through hair. A miniaturized electronics data acquisition system will be built that supports the 8 signal channels with a novel ultra-low power wireless protocol to allow enable live streaming over a 48 hour period while operating on a tiny coin cell. The end result of the Phase I project will be an evaluation device that demonstrates the key features of the neurophysiological monitoring suite.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 200.00K | Year: 2012

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Millions of people are affected by cardiac arrhythmias, some of which result in benign symptoms and others are life-threatening. Obtaining symptom-rhythm correlation is paramount to providing appropriate therapy. Whilebasic principles and techniques for arrhythmia detection are well-understood, the transient, unpredictable, and often asymptomatic nature of the disorder still make effective arrhythmia detection problematic. Issues relating to patient compliance and patient comfort make long-term ECG monitoring problematic, despite the simple and inexpensive nature of the technology. The most reliable monitoring techniques still require invasive implantable devices. With the widespread availability of inexpensive, sophisticated mobile and wireless electronics, the only real remaining barrier towards truly patient-friendly ECG monitoring systems is at the electrode/sensor-level. This proposal will develop the first practical non-contact, ECG sensor with the capability of acquiring high- quality signals through clothing. Although there are many other non-contact sensor designs in research labs around there world, there is still no real product for clinical use. Unresolved issues relating to cost, complexity, movement artifactsand noise have yet to be adequately solved. There are also dry and semi-dry sensors but they require contact with the skin, which presents a variety of problems. This project represents the first high quality, through-clothing ECG sensor. The core technology is based on a fundamentally fresh approach to the field, starting with a custom integrated circuit which developed by the PI at the University of California, San Diego. In preliminary testing, this new design has enabled far superior performance to what was possible with the off-the-shelf components used in previous efforts. Cognionics has licensed this technology for commercialization, combining it with new mechanical assemblies that greatly dampen the effects of motion artifacts while maintaining a high-level of patient comfort. We believe that this technology will finally realize the promises of non-contact sensors toward revolutionizing the way ECGs are taken. The Phase I project will conclude with a systematic clinical testing to fully understand all the performance advantages, capabilities, limitations and their clinical implications. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Millions of people are affected by cardiac arrhythmias, which are indicators of potentially life-threatening diseases, and directlylead to approximately half a million deaths each year. Detection of arrhythmia commonly requires home ECG monitoring due to the infrequency of the symptoms, yet current mobile ECG instruments suffer from poor patient comfort, convenience and compliance, reducing their efficacy. This SBIR project aims to develop a high-quality non-contact, through-clothing ECG sensor with the potential to change the way cardiac monitoring is performed.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 181.15K | Year: 2012

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The autism spectrum disorders [ASDs] encompass a set of neurodevelopmental conditions defined by abnormalities in behavior and social communicative skills. It is presently estimated that there are more than 1.5 millionautistic individuals in the US alone. Almost 50% of children with autism are completely non-verbal, and less than 10% achieve independent living as adults. Whereas sensory processing problems are not considered to be core diagnostic symptoms of autism, both clinical observations and parental questionnaires confirm the presence of sensory anomalies in 42-88% of school age children with autism. Sound hypersensitivities seem to be especially problematic for about 25% of children with autism. This is an important therapeutic target because there is mounting evidence in autism that early-stage sensory processing abnormalities are neurobiological precursors of more complicated cognitive problems, especially in the language domain. Music-based therapies [e.g., theTomatis method, the Listening Program, and Berard Auditory Integration Training] are often tried by parents hoping to improve auditory processing in their children. These programs can be moderately expensive [costs range from 500- 3000+], and may requiremultiple daily visits to a practitioners office. Somewhat disturbingly, although there are anecdotal reports on efficacy for these interventions, there is a lack of supportive peer-reviewed literature, with proposed modes of action being unsubstantiated. Based on our own behavioral and brain imaging studies of sound sensitivities in autism, we have developed a novel and innovative music-based therapy that we believe will lead to improved auditory processing abilities. This new therapy, Auditory Processing Training [APT], uses specially modulated music in an effort to re-organize atypical functional interactions in auditory cortex into a normal pattern. The method takes advantage of animal and human data showing that selective filtering of an incoming auditory stream of music or other sounds can lead to alterations in cortical organization and sound perceptions. Excitingly, the method can be implemented at home for a relatively low cost (lt 400). In the proposed project, we will conduct a Phase I clinical trial evaluating the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of APT. Both subjective parent questionnaires and objective behavioral, audiological, and functional brain imaging tests [magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography] will be used to explore the impact of APT on auditory processing and autistic features. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Auditory processing problems are especially problematic for the more than 1.5 million U.S. individuals with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. This project will evaluate the safety, tolerability and efficacy of Auditory Processing Training [APT], a new therapy that we have developed based on our prior behavioral and brain imaging studies of autism. The method can be implemented at home for a relatively low cost (lt 400).

Loading Cognionics collaborators
Loading Cognionics collaborators