Cochin, India
Cochin, India

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Mandal A.,Rajiv Gandhi Center for Aquaculture | Varkey M.,Rajiv Gandhi Center for Aquaculture | Sobhanan S.P.,Rajiv Gandhi Center for Aquaculture | Mani A.K.,Rajiv Gandhi Center for Aquaculture | And 5 more authors.
Biochemical Genetics | Year: 2014

The taxonomic ambiguity of the Indian mud crab (genus Scylla de Hann 1833) is still a cause of concern as several papers have been published with misleading identification. This is the first attempt to resolve the taxonomic uncertainty of the mud crab commonly available in Indian coastal waters using molecular genetic markers (ITS-1 and sequencing of COI gene) combined with traditional morphometry. Additionally, we developed a PCR method by which Indian mud crab species can be identified rapidly and effectively. The results clearly indicate that the green morph of the Indian mud crab is Scylla serrata and the brown morph is S. olivacea. The S. serrata commonly mentioned in the literature from India is S. olivacea; the S. tranquebarica noted by many Indian researchers should belong to S. serrata. Caution should be taken when interpreting or implementing the biological, molecular, and aquaculture data in the literature. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media.


Swaminathan T.R.,Cochin Unit | Lakra W.S.,National Bureau of Fish Genetic Resources | Lakra W.S.,Central Institute of Fisheries Education | Gopalakrishnan A.,Cochin Unit | And 3 more authors.
Aquaculture Research | Year: 2012

A fibroblastic-like cell line was established from the ornamental fish, red-line torpedo (Puntius denisonii). The red-line torpedo fin (RTF) cell line is being maintained in Leibovitz's L-15 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) for over 1 year at 28°C on a continuous basis in normal atmosphere. The growth rate of RTF cells increased as the FBS proportion increased from 5% to 20% at 28°C with optimum growth at the concentrations of 10% FBS. The morphology of RTF cell was predominantly fibroblastic like. Propagation of these cell lines was serum dependent, with a low plating efficiency (<15%). Karyotyping analysis of RTF cells at the 25th passage indicated that the modal chromosome number was 2n=50. The cell line was cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen at -196°C and could be recovered from storage after 6 months with good cell viability. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of a fragment of two mitochondrial genes, 16S rRNA and CO1, confirmed the identity of these cell lines with those reported from this animal species, confirming that the cell lines originated from P. denisonii. The bacterial extracellular products from Vibrio cholerae MTCC3904 and Aeromonas hydrophila were found to be toxic to RTF. The cell lines were not susceptible to viral nervous necrosis virus, a marine fish virus. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Swaminathan T.R.,Cochin Unit | Gopalakrishnan A.,Cochin Unit | Basheer V.S.,Cochin Unit | Divya P.R.,Cochin Unit | Jena J.K.,Cochin Unit
Indian Journal of Animal Sciences | Year: 2012

A new cell line HGF was developed from fin tissue of Epinephelus merra Bloch, 1793. The cell line was maintained in Leibovitz's L-15 supplemented with 15% FBS and cells have been subcultured 45 times. The HGF cell line consists predominantly of fibroblastic-like cells. The cells were able to grow at temperatures between 25°and 32°C with optimum temperature of 28°C. The growth rate of fin cells increased as the FBS proportion increased from 2 to 20% at 28°C with optimum growth at the concentrations of 15 or 20% FBS. After confluence, the cells were sub-cultured with a split ratio of 1:2. The cells showed fibroblastic-like morphology and reached confluence on the fourth day after subculture. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of mitochondrial 16S rRNA and COI indicated identity of these cell lines with those reported from this animal species, confirming that the cell lines were of honeycomb grouper origin. The cells were successfully cryopreserved and revived at passage numbers 10, 20 and 30. The bacterial extracellular products from Vibrio cholerae MTCC 3904 was found toxic to this cell line.


Kapoor S.,National Bureau of Fish Genetic Resources | Kamalendra,National Bureau of Fish Genetic Resources | Bhatt J.P.,National Bureau of Fish Genetic Resources | Bhatt J.P.,Hemwati Nandan Bahuguna Garhwal University | And 6 more authors.
Indian Journal of Animal Sciences | Year: 2012

A method for developing cell cultures from Chitala chitala heart tissue is described. The tissues were minced and seeded in culture flasks and grown in Leibovitz L-15 medium supplemented with 20% foetal bovine serum. The radiation started after 4th day in heart. The medium was changed after every five days. The radiations were able to withstand a wide range of temperatures from 25°C to 28°C with an optimum temperature of 28°C. A partial monolayer was observed after 12 days in heart tissue. A primary culture was successfully obtained from heart tissue of C. chitala for the first time in India.


Mandal A.,Rajiv Gandhi Center for Aquaculture | Rao D.,Rajiv Gandhi Center for Aquaculture | Karuppaiah D.,Rajiv Gandhi Center for Aquaculture | Gopalakrishnan A.,Cochin Unit | And 3 more authors.
Gene | Year: 2012

The black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon), a commercially important penaeid species, is widely distributed across the Indo-Pacific region. Genetic diversity in P. monodon collected from eight geographical regions in Southwest, East and Andaman coastal waters of India (N=418) was investigated using 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci. Average observed heterozygosity at sampled loci were high, ranging from 0.643 (Coromandel Coast) to 0.753 (South Andaman). Pairwise F ST (ranged from 0.005 to 0.078) and R ST (ranged from 0.005 to 0.171) estimates revealed surprisingly strong and statistically significant genetic structure among tiger shrimp populations. A synthetic map generated by multidimensional scaling shows an apparent cline in allele frequencies paralleling the roughly circular flow of surface currents in the Bay of Bengal. Significant heterozygote deficiencies were noted in most population samples at most loci. Andaman Island sites showed the highest diversity. Recognition of high genetic diversity and distinct population structuring of P. monodon in Indian seas has important implications for future domestication of this species in India, for two reasons: identification of the best wild founding stocks for aquaculture and, subsequently, the potential impacts of release of domesticates to the wild, either accidentally or deliberately (i.e. for stock enhancement). © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


Muneer P.M.A.,Cochin Unit | Sivanandan R.,Cochin Unit | Gopalakrishnan A.,Cochin Unit | Basheer V.S.,Cochin Unit | And 2 more authors.
Biochemical Genetics | Year: 2011

Random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and microsatellite markers were developed and used for the analysis of genetic variability in the critically endangered yellow catfish Horabagrus nigricollaris, sampled from the Chalakkudy River, Kerala, India. Eight RAPD and five microsatellite markers were detected to genotype the species. In RAPD, the 73 fragments were 20.55% polymorphic, whereas 4 polymorphic loci (80%) were obtained in microsatellites. In microsatellites, the number of alleles across the 5 loci was 1-5, and the range of heterozygosity was 0.25-0.5. The mean observed number of alleles was 2.4, and the effective number was 1.775 per locus. The average heterozygosity across all investigated samples was 0.29, indicating a significant deficiency of heterozygotes in this species. RAPD and microsatellite methods report a low degree of gene diversity and lack of genetic heterogeneity in the population of H. nigricollaris, emphasizing the need for fishery management, conservation, and rehabilitation of this species. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Akhilesh K.V.,Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute | Shanis C.P.R.,Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute | White W.T.,CSIRO | Manjebrayakath H.,Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute | And 5 more authors.
Environmental Biology of Fishes | Year: 2013

Since 28th May 2001, Whale shark Rhincodon typus Smith, 1828 have received the highest protected status for an animal in India through the Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972 Schedule-1. However, landings have still been recorded off the Indian coast since 2001, mostly as incidental bycatch in commercial fishing operations, and other sightings have also been reported. In the 1990's, a targeted whale shark fishery existed off the Gujarat coast following increased demand for the flesh in some other Asian countries. Since the ban, landings of whale sharks have decreased substantially with only 79 recorded between 2001 and 2011. Landings were recorded in each year and in each month of the year with the highest landings in January and February. Between 2001 and 2011, the smallest specimen reported from Indian waters was a 94 cm TL individual and the largest was a 13.7 m TL individual, with most individuals recorded in the 4-6 m TL size class. Small juveniles of less than 3 m TL are rarely recorded in the literature and appear to be rarely observed globally. Between 2006 and 2011, seven juveniles of less than 3 m TL were recorded from two landing sites. Despite the continued landing of whale sharks along the Indian coasts since 2001, the protection of this species appears to have substantially reduced the catches with only incidental landings and strandings now evident. The protection status of whale sharks in India is generally well understood by fishers, but still there is need for further education regarding the current national legislation and vulnerability of the species. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Bineesh K.K.,Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute CMFRI | Sajeela K.A.,Cochin Unit | Akhilesh K.V.,Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute CMFRI | Pillai N.G.K.,Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute CMFRI | Abdussamad E.M.,Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute CMFRI
Zootaxa | Year: 2011

A very rare bandfish, Sphenanthias whiteheadi Talwar 1973, is re-discovered and described from the southwest and southeast coasts of India for the first time after its original description and the rarity of the fish is challenged. A mitochondrial COI barcode sequence was generated for the specimen. Copyright © 2011, Magnolia Press.


Muneer P.M.A.,Cochin Unit | Gopalakrishnan A.,Cochin Unit | Shivanandan R.,Cochin Unit | Basheer V.S.,Cochin Unit | Ponniah A.G.,Central Institute of Brackish Water Aquaculture CIBA
Molecular Biology Reports | Year: 2011

The two species of yellow catfish, Horabagrus brachysoma and H. nigricollaris are categorized as 'endangered' and 'critically endangered' respectively in their wild habitat. Proper knowledge of genetic structure and variability of these endangered species are highly essential for the management, conservation and improvement of fish stocks. Therefore, genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships between these species of yellow catfish sampled from Chalakkudy River in the hot spot of biodiversity-Western Ghats region, Kerala, India were analyzed by using Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and microsatellite markers. 85 RAPD and five microsatellites loci were detected to analyze the genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships among these species. Out of 85 RAPD loci produced only 52.94% were polymorphic whereas in microsatellite, all 5 loci were polymorphic (100%). Speciesspecific RAPD bands were found in both species studied. In microsatellite, the number of alleles across the five loci ranged from 1 to 8. The observed heterozygosities in H. brachysoma and H. nigricollaris were 0.463 and 0.443, respectively. Here, both RAPD and microsatellite methods reported a low degree of gene diversity and lack of genetic heterogeneity in both species of Horabagrus which strongly emphasize the need of fishery management, conservation and rehabilitation of these species. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010.


Random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and microsatellite markers were developed and used for the analysis of genetic variability in the critically endangered yellow catfish Horabagrus nigricollaris, sampled from the Chalakkudy River, Kerala, India. Eight RAPD and five microsatellite markers were detected to genotype the species. In RAPD, the 73 fragments were 20.55% polymorphic, whereas 4 polymorphic loci (80%) were obtained in microsatellites. In microsatellites, the number of alleles across the 5 loci was 1-5, and the range of heterozygosity was 0.25-0.5. The mean observed number of alleles was 2.4, and the effective number was 1.775 per locus. The average heterozygosity across all investigated samples was 0.29, indicating a significant deficiency of heterozygotes in this species. RAPD and microsatellite methods report a low degree of gene diversity and lack of genetic heterogeneity in the population of H. nigricollaris, emphasizing the need for fishery management, conservation, and rehabilitation of this species.

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