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TROY, Mich.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--PPG (NYSE: PPG) experts will join development partners and other automotive and coatings industry participants to discuss two groundbreaking automotive coatings technologies and take part in a panel discussion during the 42nd Annual FOCUS (Future Of Coatings Under Study) Conference, at Michigan State University Management Education Center in Troy on May 4. Stacey Orzech, PPG manager of automotive powder coatings technology, North America, will present “Powder Tu-tone: From the ‘Box’ to the Vehicle: The Art of Powder Application in Automotive Manufacturing.” She will discuss the work that enabled color powder basecoats by PPG to be used in commercial production on a light vehicle body, providing operational efficiency, exceptional anti-chip performance and near-zero volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions for the OEM. Caroline Harris, PPG senior research manager, original equipment manufacturer (OEM) decorative automotive coatings, and Jim Pakkala, senior engineering manager for Dürr Systems, will describe how the companies partnered to develop “Project LEAPP™ – Low Energy Automotive Paint Process.” Project LEAPP technology was funded in part by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-0005777. The presentation will examine "compact process" paint application systems, which reduce capital expenditures and operating costs for OEMs by eliminating the need for energy-intensive drying equipment and decreasing total painting time, and it will describe a vision for the future of spray-applied coating layers including a technical development underway to enable low-temperature curing in industrial applications. Additionally, Jim Ohlinger, PPG product engineering manager, sprayable decorative automotive coatings, will participate in a panel discussion titled "From the Can to the Car – Extending the Boundaries of Technology." Presented by the Detroit Society for Coatings Technology, the FOCUS Conference features experts who examine and present ways of extending the boundaries of coatings technology that will transport the automotive industry into the future. For more about PPG’s innovative automotive OEM coatings products and technologies, visit www.ppgautocoatings.com. PPG: WE PROTECT AND BEAUTIFY THE WORLD™ At PPG (NYSE:PPG), we work every day to develop and deliver the paints, coatings and materials that our customers have trusted for more than 130 years. Through dedication and creativity, we solve our customers’ biggest challenges, collaborating closely to find the right path forward. With headquarters in Pittsburgh, we operate and innovate in more than 70 countries and reported net sales of $14.8 billion in 2016. We serve customers in construction, consumer products, industrial and transportation markets and aftermarkets. To learn more, visit www.ppg.com. We protect and beautify the world and LEAPP are trademarks and the PPG Logo is a registered trademark of PPG Industries Ohio, Inc.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

-- Axalta Coating Systems, a leading global supplier of liquid and powder coatings, will serve multiple roles including presenter, exhibitor, and sponsor at the Future of Coatings Under Study (FOCUS) conference at the Michigan State University Education Center in Troy, Michigan on May 4, 2017. Matthew Boland, Axalta Vice President of Global Transportation Coatings Technology, and Jake Welland, Axalta Product Manager serve as Focus 2017 chairs and helped organize the event.The 42annual FOCUS event titled,features presentations from automotive industry experts who will discuss innovative ways to utilize technology to transport the auto industry into the future. Joanne Hardy, Axalta Global Research and Development Director, will lead a panel discussion based on the conference theme with five other industry experts at 1:00 p.m. Dr. Michael Koerner, Axalta Technical Fellow, will present on the rheology (the study of the flow of liquid matter) of automotive paint coatings at 2:45 p.m."The FOCUS conference is a valued tradition in the coatings industry and we are seeing a record level of interest from the automotive industry," said Boland. "The FOCUS planning committee accepted a challenge from key automotive OEM customers to expand the technical agenda and add an increased 'focus' on application technology. This year's program is set to deliver on that challenge and it is fitting to see Axalta experts play a key role in meeting that request."To celebrate the fusion of technology and design, Axalta's exhibit will showcase its Automotive Color of the Year 2017 Gallant Gray, a luxurious color enhanced with blue and silver flakes that exemplifies modernity and sophistication. Gallant Gray debuted at the 2017 North American International Auto Show.Axalta is a leading global company focused solely on coatings and providing customers with innovative, colorful, beautiful and sustainable solutions. From light OEM vehicles, commercial vehicles and refinish applications to electric motors, buildings and pipelines, our coatings are designed to prevent corrosion, increase productivity and enable the materials we coat to last longer. With more than 150 years of experience in the coatings industry, the approximately 13,000 people of Axalta continue to find ways to serve our more than 100,000 customers in 130 countries better every day with the finest coatings, application systems and technology. For more information visit http://www.axaltacs.com/ us/en_US/products- services/powder...


News Article | May 6, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Clinton Township, MI, May 06, 2017 --( The 42nd annual FOCUS event titled, From the Can to the Car: Extending Boundaries of Technology features presentations from automotive industry experts who will discuss innovative ways to utilize technology to transport the auto industry into the future. Joanne Hardy, Axalta Global Research and Development Director, will lead a panel discussion based on the conference theme with five other industry experts at 1:00 p.m. Dr. Michael Koerner, Axalta Technical Fellow, will present on the rheology (the study of the flow of liquid matter) of automotive paint coatings at 2:45 p.m. "The FOCUS conference is a valued tradition in the coatings industry and we are seeing a record level of interest from the automotive industry," said Boland. "The FOCUS planning committee accepted a challenge from key automotive OEM customers to expand the technical agenda and add an increased 'focus' on application technology. This year's program is set to deliver on that challenge and it is fitting to see Axalta experts play a key role in meeting that request." To celebrate the fusion of technology and design, Axalta's exhibit will showcase its Automotive Color of the Year 2017 Gallant Gray, a luxurious color enhanced with blue and silver flakes that exemplifies modernity and sophistication. Gallant Gray debuted at the 2017 North American International Auto Show. About Axalta Coating Systems Axalta is a leading global company focused solely on coatings and providing customers with innovative, colorful, beautiful and sustainable solutions. From light OEM vehicles, commercial vehicles and refinish applications to electric motors, buildings and pipelines, our coatings are designed to prevent corrosion, increase productivity and enable the materials we coat to last longer. With more than 150 years of experience in the coatings industry, the approximately 13,000 people of Axalta continue to find ways to serve our more than 100,000 customers in 130 countries better every day with the finest coatings, application systems and technology. For more information visit http://www.axaltacs.com/us/en_US/products-services/powder-coatings/powder-coatings.html Clinton Township, MI, May 06, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Axalta Coating Systems, a leading global supplier of liquid and powder coatings, will serve multiple roles including presenter, exhibitor, and sponsor at the Future of Coatings Under Study (FOCUS) conference at the Michigan State University Education Center in Troy, Michigan on May 4, 2017. Matthew Boland, Axalta Vice President of Global Transportation Coatings Technology, and Jake Welland, Axalta Product Manager serve as Focus 2017 chairs and helped organize the event.The 42nd annual FOCUS event titled, From the Can to the Car: Extending Boundaries of Technology features presentations from automotive industry experts who will discuss innovative ways to utilize technology to transport the auto industry into the future. Joanne Hardy, Axalta Global Research and Development Director, will lead a panel discussion based on the conference theme with five other industry experts at 1:00 p.m. Dr. Michael Koerner, Axalta Technical Fellow, will present on the rheology (the study of the flow of liquid matter) of automotive paint coatings at 2:45 p.m."The FOCUS conference is a valued tradition in the coatings industry and we are seeing a record level of interest from the automotive industry," said Boland. "The FOCUS planning committee accepted a challenge from key automotive OEM customers to expand the technical agenda and add an increased 'focus' on application technology. This year's program is set to deliver on that challenge and it is fitting to see Axalta experts play a key role in meeting that request."To celebrate the fusion of technology and design, Axalta's exhibit will showcase its Automotive Color of the Year 2017 Gallant Gray, a luxurious color enhanced with blue and silver flakes that exemplifies modernity and sophistication. Gallant Gray debuted at the 2017 North American International Auto Show.About Axalta Coating SystemsAxalta is a leading global company focused solely on coatings and providing customers with innovative, colorful, beautiful and sustainable solutions. From light OEM vehicles, commercial vehicles and refinish applications to electric motors, buildings and pipelines, our coatings are designed to prevent corrosion, increase productivity and enable the materials we coat to last longer. With more than 150 years of experience in the coatings industry, the approximately 13,000 people of Axalta continue to find ways to serve our more than 100,000 customers in 130 countries better every day with the finest coatings, application systems and technology. For more information visit http://www.axaltacs.com/us/en_US/products-services/powder-coatings/powder-coatings.html Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Axalta Powder Coatings North America


BERLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Axalta Coating Systems (NYSE: AXTA), a leading global manufacturer of liquid and powder coatings, will attend the European Coatings Technology Forum Coatings for Agriculture and Construction Equipment (ACE), taking place in Berlin, Germany, on November 24, 2016 at 11:45 a.m. Dr. Carlos Rodriguez Santamarta, Marketing and Strategy Manager for Axalta’s Industrial Coatings business in Europe, Middle East and Africa, will discuss trends and technological advances in coating


News Article | October 5, 2016
Site: www.nanotech-now.com

Home > Press > NIST-made 'sun and rain' used to study nanoparticle release from polymers Abstract: If the 1967 film "The Graduate" were remade today, Mr. McGuire's famous advice to young Benjamin Braddock would probably be updated to "Plastics ... with nanoparticles." These days, the mechanical, electrical and durability properties of polymers--the class of materials that includes plastics--are often enhanced by adding miniature particles (smaller than 100 nanometers or billionths of a meter) made of elements such as silicon or silver. But could those nanoparticles be released into the environment after the polymers are exposed to years of sun and water--and if so, what might be the health and ecological consequences? In a recently published paper, researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) describe how they subjected a commercial nanoparticle-infused coating to NIST-developed methods for accelerating the effects of weathering from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and simulated washings of rainwater. Their results indicate that humidity and exposure time are contributing factors for nanoparticle release, findings that may be useful in designing future studies to determine potential impacts. In their recent experiment, the researchers exposed multiple samples of a commercially available polyurethane coating containing silicon dioxide nanoparticles to intense UV radiation for 100 days inside the NIST SPHERE (Simulated Photodegradation via High-Energy Radiant Exposure), a hollow, 2-meter (7-foot) diameter black aluminum chamber lined with highly UV reflective material that bears a casual resemblance to the Death Star in the film "Star Wars." For this study, one day in the SPHERE was equivalent to 10 to 15 days outdoors. All samples were weathered at a constant temperature of 50 degrees Celsius (122 degrees Fahrenheit) with one group done in extremely dry conditions (approximately 0 percent humidity) and the other in humid conditions (75 percent humidity). To determine if any nanoparticles were released from the polymer coating during UV exposure, the researchers used a technique they created and dubbed "NIST simulated rain." Filtered water was converted into tiny droplets, sprayed under pressure onto the individual samples, and then the runoff--with any loose nanoparticles--was collected in a bottle. This procedure was conducted at the beginning of the UV exposure, at every two weeks during the weathering run and at the end. All of the runoff fluids were then analyzed by NIST chemists for the presence of silicon and in what amounts. Additionally, the weathered coatings were examined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to reveal surface changes resulting from UV exposure. Both sets of coating samples--those weathered in very low humidity and the others in very humid conditions--degraded but released only small amounts of nanoparticles. The researchers found that more silicon was recovered from the samples weathered in humid conditions and that nanoparticle release increased as the UV exposure time increased. Microscopic examination showed that deformations in the coating surface became more numerous with longer exposure time, and that nanoparticles left behind after the coating degraded often bound together in clusters. "These data, and the data from future experiments of this type, are valuable for developing computer models to predict the long-term release of nanoparticles from commercial coatings used outdoors, and in turn, help manufacturers, regulatory officials and others assess any health and environmental impacts from them," said NIST research chemist Deborah Jacobs, lead author on the study published in the Journal of Coatings Technology and Research. This project resulted from a collaboration between NIST's Engineering Laboratory and Material Measurement Laboratory. It is part of NIST's work to help characterize the potential environmental, health and safety (EHS) risks of nanomaterials, and develop methods for identifying and measuring them. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | October 3, 2016
Site: www.cemag.us

In their recent experiment, the researchers exposed multiple samples of a commercially available polyurethane coating containing silicon dioxide nanoparticles to intense UV radiation for 100 days inside the NIST SPHERE (Simulated Photodegradation via High-Energy Radiant Exposure), a hollow, 2-meter (7-ft.) diameter black aluminum chamber lined with highly UV reflective material that bears a casual resemblance to the Death Star in the film Star Wars. For this study, one day in the SPHERE was equivalent to 10 to 15 days outdoors. All samples were weathered at a constant temperature of 50 C (122 F) with one group done in extremely dry conditions (approximately 0 percent humidity) and the other in humid conditions (75 percent humidity). To determine if any nanoparticles were released from the polymer coating during UV exposure, the researchers used a technique they created and dubbed “NIST simulated rain.” Filtered water was converted into tiny droplets, sprayed under pressure onto the individual samples, and then the runoff — with any loose nanoparticles — was collected in a bottle. This procedure was conducted at the beginning of the UV exposure, at every two weeks during the weathering run and at the end. All of the runoff fluids were then analyzed by NIST chemists for the presence of silicon and in what amounts. Additionally, the weathered coatings were examined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to reveal surface changes resulting from UV exposure. Both sets of coating samples — those weathered in very low humidity and the others in very humid conditions — degraded but released only small amounts of nanoparticles. The researchers found that more silicon was recovered from the samples weathered in humid conditions and that nanoparticle release increased as the UV exposure time increased. Microscopic examination showed that deformations in the coating surface became more numerous with longer exposure time, and that nanoparticles left behind after the coating degraded often bound together in clusters. “These data, and the data from future experiments of this type, are valuable for developing computer models to predict the long-term release of nanoparticles from commercial coatings used outdoors, and in turn, help manufacturers, regulatory officials and others assess any health and environmental impacts from them,” says NIST research chemist Deborah Jacobs, lead author on the study published in the Journal of Coatings Technology and Research. This project resulted from a collaboration between NIST’s Engineering Laboratory and Material Measurement Laboratory. It is part of NIST's work to help characterize the potential environmental, health and safety (EHS) risks of nanomaterials, and develop methods for identifying and measuring them.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

NEI Corporation recently announced that the US Patent and Trademark Office has issued a notice of allowance to the company on two patent applications; one for a durable highly hydrophobic coating and the other for an adhesion promoting surface treatment. These patents complement NEI’s portfolio of patents pertaining to superhydrophobic, self-healing, and abrasion resistant coatings. With the allowance of seven patents, and the introduction of an array of coating products, NEI’s concerted efforts to develop and implement practical, multi-functional protective coatings have now come to fruition. There is great interest in functional coatings, for both industrial and consumer applications, where the coating or surface treatment provides functionalities beyond the usual protective and aesthetic properties. For example, self-healing coatings autonomously repair damage, hydrophobic coatings are able to vigorously repel water droplets, oleophobic coatings prevent “oil” molecules from sticking to the surface, self-cleaning or easy-to-clean coatings minimize or eliminate the need for chemicals during washing, and adhesion promoter surface treatments enable an ultra-strong bond between the primer and the surface. Commercial products to date have met with limited success because they are not engineered to meet all of the functional performance requirements that an application requires. NEI’s patented and patent-pending technologies address this market need. The recently allowed patent application describes durable hydrophobic coating compositions that are highly desirable for numerous applications, as they impart easy-to-clean and stain-resisting properties to surfaces. For aesthetic reasons, there is also a need for a thin, transparent, easy-to-clean coating that does not add excess weight and does not change the appearance of the substrate to be coated. The patented compositions are comprised of functionalized perfluoropolyethers (PFPEs), which are known for their non-stick and lubricating properties. It has been a major technical challenge to incorporate PFPEs into a stable formulation that can lead to a coating with sufficient adhesion to various substrates. The patent claims transparent and homogeneous compositions that overcome the stability and adhesion issues. The compositions result in a micron-thick, durable hydrophobic coating that cannot easily be removed by abrasion, harsh cleaners, or chemicals. The patent is the basis for NEI’s hydrophobic coating products, NANOMYTE® SuperCN and SR-100EC. The adhesion promoter patent application describes a chromate-free, surface pretreatment composition. The environmentally-friendly, waterborne pretreatment promotes the adhesion between a metal substrate and an overlying paint layer by acting as a “double‐sided bonding agent,” while at the same time improving corrosion resistance. The novel composition comprises organo-functional silanes but functions differently from traditional silane treatments. The composition results in a thin film coating having a graded structure, i.e., an inorganic oxide layer that bonds strongly with steel and a loosely crosslinked top layer containing functional groups that can further crosslink with paint overlay. The new technology is valuable to applicators who paint metal structures, such as bridges, ships, and other steel structures. It is also applicable to industrial painting operations, such as coil and spray coatings. The patented chromate‐free pretreatment for steel, offered commercially as NANOMYTE® PT-20, represents a significant advancement in the state‐of‐the‐art for corrosion resistant technologies. For a more detailed discussion on the company’s patented coating technologies and applications, please see our Patented Coatings Technology Brief.


Challener C.,Coatings Technology
JCT CoatingsTech | Year: 2015

The use of concrete for interior and exterior applications in new construction and renovation projects has increased due to the recognition of this substrate as a more sustainable, recyclable material. Concrete can also be more cost-effective, both initially and over its lifetime. In addition, staining provides options for a vast array of aesthetically pleasing looks for new concrete and an attractive way to revitalize existing spaces. From patios and pool surroundings to outdoor areas in hotels, restaurants, casinos, and theme parks, homeowners and commercial businesses are using concrete stains to create unique atmospheres.


News Article | September 2, 2016
Site: phys.org

The device consists of a plasma component and a power source and operates in special regimes of magnetron discharge—sputtering is accompanied by the intensive evaporation of melted matter from which a coating is formed. According to an article published in the scientific journal Surface and Coatings Technology, the new method will make it possible to rapidly apply high-quality thin films in high technology applications. Deposition by magnetron sputtering is widely used for metallic and dielectric coatings in electronics, machine-building, architecture and other areas. For instance, magnetron deposition is the only method of applying energy-saving coatings on the glass panes of buildings. This method is also used to apply hard coatings to cutting instruments and in all kinds of decorative coverings—titanium nitride is applied to church cupolas instead of gold, for instance. In microelectronics, this method is used for metallizing IC panels and in optics to make light filters. The discovery of high-intensity pulsed magnetron discharge by MEPhI in the late 1980s was a powerful impetus for research in this field. In the 2000s, Europe and the United States introduced HiPIMS (High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering) technology on its basis. "However, magnetron deposition had a drawback—the speed at which coatings formed on materials was low compared to vacuum evaporation," said Alexander Tumarkin, an engineer at MEPhI. He added that the coatings left by vacuum evaporation were much worse than those produced by magnetron deposition. Tumarkin said industrialists have always faced a choice between the quality of products and productivity of an enterprise. "We managed to unite the advantages of both technologies in the device for creating a high-intensity pulsed magnetron discharge with a melted cathode," he said, adding that high-current sputtering of a melted target has enormous technological potential. At present, experts are working on prototypes of the device that will be produced on a commercial scale in the future. "The industrial prototype of the device may be used as a plasma generator in industrial and laboratory conditions as a separate module for creating high-quality films," said MEPhI engineer Andrei Kaziyev, adding that it will be required by companies producing energy-saving glass, modern energy elements and various machine-building enterprises.


News Article | January 23, 2016
Site: www.nanotech-now.com

Abstract: Iranian researchers produced special nanostructured coatings that can be used in aircraft bodies to protect them against heat. The advantage of these coatings over normal coatings is their ultra light weight. The research has been carried out at the laboratorial scale and the results have applications in aerospace systems and sustainable energies. Coatings were synthesized in this research by using magnetic nanoporous pigments made of iron oxide, and their application was evaluated in the protection of aircraft bodies by carrying out various tests. Based on the results, magnetic nanoporous pigments synthesized in this research have appropriate structure and they have better light sorption to emission ratio than conventional industrial pigments or even carbon black. In other words, the ratio in the synthesized sample is closer to one in comparison with that in usual samples; therefore, these products are highly good options to be used in the production of thermal coatings in aircrafts. According to the researchers, weight is an important parameter in designing aircrafts and aerospace systems. In this research, the weight of pigment is decreased due to the application of nanoporous pigments. This fact finally results in a decrease in the weight of the final system. In addition, the concentration of pigment used in the structure is less than the critical volume concentration of the pigment due to the presence of nanopores in the structure. Therefore, a better performance of the coating has been observed in general tests such as abrasion, adhesion and bending tests. Results of the research can be used in low-orbit space systems, solar collectors and energy production sources. Results of the research have been published in Journal of Coatings Technology and Research, vol. 12, issue 6, 2015, pp. 1065-1071. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

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