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Sila A.,University of Sfax | Sila A.,CNRS Regional Laboratory of Agri-Food and Biotechnology Research: The Charles VIOLLETTE Institute | Bougatef A.,University of Sfax
Journal of Functional Foods | Year: 2016

In recent years, several attempts have been made for the utilisation of the protein rich fish processing by-product discards and underutilised fish proteins for the production of commercially valuable food ingredients. There has been an increasing interest in the utilisation of marine products, and novel bioprocessing technologies are developing for isolation of some bioactive substances. Antioxidant peptides isolated from marine food products have been used as functional foods and nutraceuticals. Peptides obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of fish proteins exhibit not only nutritional but also biological properties for use in diet or in therapeutic purposes. In this review, we have focused on the enzymatic process for generating antioxidant peptides from marine by-products as well as on the isolation procedures of selected antioxidant peptides. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Hassoun A.,CNRS Regional Laboratory of Agri-Food and Biotechnology Research: The Charles VIOLLETTE Institute | Karoui R.,CNRS Regional Laboratory of Agri-Food and Biotechnology Research: The Charles VIOLLETTE Institute
Food Chemistry | Year: 2016

Quality assessment of whiting (Merlangius merlangus) fillets stored in normal air (control group) and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP1: 50% N2/50% CO2 and MAP2: 80% N2/20% CO2) for up to 15 days at 4 °C was performed. The physico-chemical [pH, drip loss, moisture content, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and peroxide value (PV)], textural (i.e., hardness, fragility, gumminess, chewiness, springiness, cohesiveness), and color (i.e., L∗ a∗ b∗) parameters were determined. Front face fluorescence spectroscopy (FFFS) emission spectra were also scanned on the same samples with excitation set at 290 and 360 nm. The results indicated that MAP treatment, particularly MAP1 had an obvious preservative effect on fish quality by reducing pH value, TBARS and TVB-N contents, and retarding the softening of fish texture compared to control samples. Principal component analysis (PCA) applied to physico-chemical and instrumental data sets showed a clear discrimination of fish samples according to both their storage time and condition. A complete (100%) of correct classification was obtained by the concatenation of spectral, physico-chemical, and instrumental data sets. The results demonstrated that storage under MAP can be recommended to improve quality of whiting fillets, which in turn, can be evaluated by FFFS as a rapid and non-destructive technique. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Cudennec B.,CNRS Regional Laboratory of Agri-Food and Biotechnology Research: The Charles VIOLLETTE Institute | Violle N.,ETAP Laboratory | Chataigne G.,CNRS Regional Laboratory of Agri-Food and Biotechnology Research: The Charles VIOLLETTE Institute | Drevet P.,HPE Ingredients | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Functional Foods | Year: 2016

The antihypertensive potential of a land snail by-product hydrolysate (SBH), obtained after an industrial treatment of the raw material, was studied in vitro and in vivo. The ACE inhibitory activity of SBH was characterised by an IC50 value of 23 μg·mL-1, which was not affected by in vitro digestion. SBH enhanced the Caco-2 intestinal cell metabolic activity and did not induce any toxicity in Wistar rats. The partial purification of SBH led to the obtainment of an active fraction characterised by an IC50 of 0.007 μg·mL-1. The sequences of the 17 most abundant peptides of the fraction were identified by LC/MS/MS analysis. Seven of them (YG, YA, VY, SF, FG, GF and VW) are known ACE inhibitory peptides. Finally, in vivo study on SHR rats showed that SBH significantly reduced systolic blood pressure. SBH represents therefore a new candidate as an ingredient for the design of functional foods against hypertension. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Lelievre-Desmas M.,CNRS Regional Laboratory of Agri-Food and Biotechnology Research: The Charles VIOLLETTE Institute | Chollet S.,CNRS Regional Laboratory of Agri-Food and Biotechnology Research: The Charles VIOLLETTE Institute | Abdi H.,University of Texas at Dallas | Valentin D.,University of Burgundy
Acta Psychologica | Year: 2015

Category learning is an important aspect of expertise development which had been little studied in the chemosensory field. The wine literature suggests that through repeated exposure to wines, sensory information is stored by experts as prototypes. The goal of this study was to further explore this issue using beers. We tested the ability of beer consumers to correctly categorize beers from two different categories (top- and bottom-fermented beers) before and after repeated exposure with feedback to beers from these categories. We found that participants learned to identify the category membership of beers to which they have been exposed but were unable to generalize their learning to other beers. A retrospective verbal protocol questionnaire administrated at the end of the experiment indicates that contrary to what was suggested in the wine literature, prototype extraction is probably not the only mechanism implicated in category learning of foods and beverages. Exemplar-similarity and feature-frequency models might provide a better account of the course of learning of the categorization task studied. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Source


Gomez-Corona C.,Metropolitan Autonomous University | Lelievre-Desmas M.,CNRS Regional Laboratory of Agri-Food and Biotechnology Research: The Charles VIOLLETTE Institute | Escalona Buendia H.B.,Metropolitan Autonomous University | Chollet S.,CNRS Regional Laboratory of Agri-Food and Biotechnology Research: The Charles VIOLLETTE Institute | Valentin D.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research
Food Quality and Preference | Year: 2016

Consumption of craft beer has been changing worldwide; it passed from a rarely known to a common product amongst consumers. In the past years craft beer sales have been growing faster than the dominant lager-style in countries with different beer tradition like Mexico and France. A change in consumption habits is a sign that the representation of the product is changing. It is, therefore, valuable to understand the elements and structure of this new representation. The present study was conducted to understand the impact of culture and consumption habits on beer representation. Three-hundred male consumers (craft and industrial beer users) were interviewed in Mexico and France. Participants were asked to perform: (1) free word association task using "craft beer" as inductor word, (2) ranking task of the evoked words based on their importance, and (3) valence rating task of each evoked word. Each word was characterized by a mean importance value and a frequency of elicitation to identify their role as central or peripheral elements in the representation. Results showed that consumers from same culture share similar social representations of craft beer, even when they have different consumption habits (craft-industrial). Mexican consumers share alcohol, and flavour as central elements in their representations but share only one peripheral element "tradition". French consumers share two central elements taste and party. When comparing consumers across cultures, French and Mexican craft participants share no central elements in their representations towards beer; whereas industrial beer consumers share one element "alcohol". Craft consumers seem to have a more structured social representation, sustained or nourished on consumption habits, whilst the representation of industrial beer consumers seems less resistant, or capable of changing over time. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Source

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