CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety

Rouen, France

CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety

Rouen, France
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Leveneur S.,CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety | Leveneur S.,Åbo Akademi University | Thones M.,CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety | Hebert J.-P.,INSA Rouen | And 2 more authors.
Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research | Year: 2012

This article proposes a kinetic and thermal study of the formic acid perhydrolysis in a semibatch process at various hydrogen peroxide concentrations (5.32-8.21 mol/L), formic acid molar inlet flow rates (0.04-0.22 mol/min), reaction temperatures (30-60 °C), and catalyst amount (0.0-10.6 g). A cation-exchange resin, i.e., Amberlite IR-120, was used as a catalyst. Synthesis and decomposition of peroxyformic acid were modeled by coupling the energy and mass balances, and a pseudohomogeneous model for the reaction kinetics. A nonlinear regression method was used to estimate the kinetic parameters, such as rate constant, and thermal parameters, such as reaction enthalpy. The knowledge of these parameters allows the determination of maximum temperature of the synthesis reaction (MTSR), the time to maximum rate under adiabatic condition (TMR ad), and the criticality classification. These safety parameters are important to properly design the industrial reactor. © 2012 American Chemical Society.


Aboukais A.,University of Lille Nord de France | Aboukais A.,CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety | Abi-Aad E.,University of Lille Nord de France | Taouk B.,Equipe Catalyse
Materials Chemistry and Physics | Year: 2013

Manganese oxide catalysts supported on titania (TiO2) were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation method in order to elaborate catalysts for total oxidation of toluene and PAHs. These catalysts have been characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), temperature programmed reduction (TPR) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). It has been shown that for the 5%Mn/TiO2 catalyst the reducibility and the mobility of oxygen are higher compared, in one side, to other x%Mn/TiO2 samples and, in another side, to catalysts where TiO2 support was replaced by γ-Al 2O3 or SiO2. It has been shown that the content of manganese loading on TiO2 has an effect on the catalytic activity in the toluene oxidation. A maximum of activity was obtained for the 5%Mn/TiO2 catalyst where the total conversion of toluene was reached at 340 C. This activity seems to be correlated to the presence of the Mn 3+/Mn4+ redox couple in the catalyst. When the Mn content increases, large particles of Mn2O3 appear leading then to the decrease in the corresponding activity. In addition, compared to both other supports, TiO2 seems to be the best to give the best catalytic activity for the oxidation of toluene when it is loaded with 5% of manganese. For this reason, the latter catalyst was tested for the abatement of some PAHs. The light off temperature of PAHs compounds increases with increasing of benzene rings number and with decreasing of H/C ratio. All of PAHs are almost completely oxidized and converted at temperatures lower than 500 C. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Ouboukhlik M.,CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety | Ouboukhlik M.,INSA Rouen | Saengkaew S.,INSA Rouen | Fournier-Salaun M.-C.,CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety | And 2 more authors.
Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering | Year: 2015

CO2 capture is still a major challenge for the environment and decarbonization of gas streams. It has been industrially feasible for several decades using chemical absorption by alkanolamine solvents. The purpose of this work is to characterize the mass transfer in a spray contactor during CO2 absorption using monoethanolamine as a solvent. A new, effective way to investigate mass transfer is to measure the refractive index during the reactive absorption. Indeed, the concentration and temperature evolution inside the droplet during absorption induces a modification of the refractive index. By using rainbow refractometry technique (GRT), the liquid side mass transfer coefficient was measured in a controlled gas atmosphere during a transfer process in aqueous 30% (w/w) monoethanolamine and compared to the literature. © 2014 Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering.


Ehtash M.,CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety | Ehtash M.,High Institute for Engineering Profession | Fournier-Salaun M.-C.,CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety | Dimitrov K.,University of Lille Nord de France | And 2 more authors.
Chemical Engineering Journal | Year: 2014

The removal of phenol from aqueous media such as wastewater, using pertraction in rotating discs contactor is investigated. Preliminary equilibrium extraction study with several organic solvents show that vegetable oils (rapeseed and sunflower oils) can substitute classically volatile organic solvents used as phenol extracting agents. Rapeseed oil allows very efficient removal of phenol from acid aqueous solutions (feed phase) to basic aqueous solution (receiving phase) during batch pertraction studies. In order to optimize operating conditions, the influence of parameters, such as rotating discs speed and initial phenol concentration in the feed phase, on phenol mass transfer is studied. The transport rate of phenol increases with increasing the rotating discs speed. The increase of feed phase phenol concentration has not influence on its transport rate. Semi-continuous pertraction process allows the concentration of phenol. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Alileche N.,CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety | Alileche N.,CNRS Informatics Systems Laboratory | Alileche N.,University of Bologna | Cozzani V.,University of Bologna | And 4 more authors.
Reliability Engineering and System Safety | Year: 2015

Abstract Domino effects resulting in cascading events in the chemical and process industries are well known causes of severe accident scenarios. Although the threats due to domino effects are recognized since at least three decades, this is still a controversial topic when coming to its assessment. A number of different approaches are proposed in technical standards and in the scientific literature. The present contribution aims at providing a critical revision of the procedure for the identification of domino effect scenarios. An overview of current regulations for domino effect assessment is provided. The criteria resulting from the regulations are compared and discussed in the light of recent developments concerning escalation hazards and safety distance assessments. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Saggadi H.,CNRS Integrated Transformations of Renewable Matter | Saggadi H.,CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety | Luart D.,CNRS Integrated Transformations of Renewable Matter | Thiebault N.,CNRS Integrated Transformations of Renewable Matter | And 4 more authors.
RSC Advances | Year: 2014

An efficient "green" modified Skraup reaction in neat water was developed using inexpensive, abundant and environmentally-friendly glycerol under microwave irradiation conditions. Starting from aniline derivatives, various quinolines were obtained in 10-66% yields. The use of nitroaniline led to the corresponding phenanthrolines in 15-52% yields, respectively. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.


Wang M.H.,CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety | Ledoux A.,CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety | Estel L.,CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety
Journal of Chemical and Engineering Data | Year: 2013

This work measures oxygen concentration in the system MEA/H 2O/CO2. A polarographic probe and the Winkler's method have been used in this study. The influence of several parameters have been studied: MEA concentration in the range 100 w = 0 to 80, CO2 loading in the range 0 to 0.5, and temperature from 10 C up to 60 C. Measurements have been carried out at atmospheric pressure. We show that oxygen concentration decreases as temperature drops, but also as CO2 loading increases. MEA concentration does not affect oxygen solubility. © 2013 American Chemical Society.


Saggadi H.,CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety | Saggadi H.,CNRS Integrated Transformations of Renewable Matter | Polaert I.,CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety | Luart D.,CNRS Integrated Transformations of Renewable Matter | And 3 more authors.
Catalysis Today | Year: 2015

Abstract Microwave heating is an interesting technology for chemical engineering, since it can provide effective volumetric heating of the reaction medium and reduce energy costs. Many commercially available laboratory-scale microwave reactors have already been used to carry out chemical reactions on a small scale (a few milliliters), and at high temperatures and pressures. Some research has been undertaken to scale-up microwave processes and make them suitable for a larger scale production. Indeed, combining wave propagation through the walls of a reactor with resistance toward high pressure and temperature as well, is not an easy task. For these reasons, this work focuses on the development of a pilot scale microwave apparatus used for the heating of larger reaction volumes under pressure, and under controlled conditions. The specially designed microwave apparatus allows chemical reactions in batch or continuous mode. The applicator operates in single mode enabling a uniform electromagnetic field, and well controlled operating conditions. The main advantage of the setup is the quite large reactor volume that permits either relatively long residence times or relatively high mass flowrates (up to 1 kg/h). The developed microwave apparatus was then used for quinoline synthesis from glycerol via a modified Skraup reaction. The major advantage of our system is the ability to carry out continuous chemical synthesis, at a large pilot scale, and high temperatures (200-220 °C), while ensuring a better control of the pressure (max. 19 bar) through the control of the power absorbed by the reaction medium. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Polaert I.,CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety | Estel L.,CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety | Delmotte M.,CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety | Luart D.,TIMR Transformations Integrees de la Matiere RenouvelableEA 4297 UTC ESCOMCompiegne60200 France | Len C.,TIMR Transformations Integrees de la Matiere RenouvelableEA 4297 UTC ESCOMCompiegne60200 France
AIChE Journal | Year: 2016

A new and original high pressure reactor has been designed and developed for continuous flow chemistry under microwaves at industrial scale. The reactor originality is that the microwave applicator is the reactor itself. It allows then the use of metallic and thick walls for the reactor adapted to a use at high pressures and high temperatures. Wave propagation coupled to heat transfer was simulated using COMSOL Multiphysics® and the design was optimized to minimize wave reflections and maximize energy transfers in the reacting medium. This leads to extremely good energy yields. Experiments confirm that the microwave energy is fully absorbed by the reacting medium. The reactor allows continuous chemical reactions at a kg/h scale, under microwave heating, up to 7 MPa and 200°C. The double dehydration of hexylene glycol has been performed under various operating conditions demonstrating then the operability of this new reactor. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.


Saggadi H.,CNRS Integrated Transformations of Renewable Matter | Saggadi H.,CNRS Laboratory of Chemical Process Safety | Luart D.,CNRS Integrated Transformations of Renewable Matter | Thiebault N.,CNRS Integrated Transformations of Renewable Matter | And 3 more authors.
Catalysis Communications | Year: 2014

An efficient and modified Skraup reaction and Bamberger rearrangement in neat water were developed using nitrobenzene and an inexpensive, abundant and environmentally-friendly glycerol under microwave irradiation conditions was furnish regioselectively to the 6-hydroxyquinoline. The target compound was obtained in 77% yield via efficient domino reaction with a "one pot eleven steps". © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

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