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Vatele J.-M.,CNRS Institute of Molecular and Supramolecular Chemistry and Biochemistry
Tetrahedron | Year: 2010

Two methods for the oxidative rearrangement of tertiary allylic alcohols have been developed. Most of tertiary allylic alcohols studied were oxidized to their corresponding transposed carbonyl derivatives in excellent to fair yields by reaction with TEMPO in combination with PhIO and Bi(OTf)3 or copper (II) chloride in the presence or not of oxygen. Other primary oxidants of TEMPO such as PhI(OAc)2, mCPBA, and Oxone® were unsatisfactory giving the enone in modest to low yields. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Tlili A.,Leibniz Institute for Catalysis at the University of Rostock | Billard T.,CNRS Institute of Molecular and Supramolecular Chemistry and Biochemistry
Angewandte Chemie - International Edition | Year: 2013

Modern chemistry with an old substituent: The introduction of the SCF 3 group into organic substrates is a challenging task because of harsh or specific synthetic methods. However, recent advances in the formation of C-SCF3 bonds include the trifluoromethylthiolation with transition-metal-free systems or in the presence of palladium, nickel, or copper catalysts (see scheme). Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Source


Sassolas A.,CNRS Institute of Molecular and Supramolecular Chemistry and Biochemistry | Sassolas A.,University of Perpignan | Blum L.J.,CNRS Institute of Molecular and Supramolecular Chemistry and Biochemistry | Leca-Bouvier B.D.,CNRS Institute of Molecular and Supramolecular Chemistry and Biochemistry
Biotechnology Advances | Year: 2012

Immobilization of enzymes on the transducer surface is a necessary and critical step in the design of biosensors. An overview of the different immobilization techniques reported in the literature is given, dealing with classical adsorption, covalent bonds, entrapment, cross-linking or affinity as well as combination of them and focusing on new original methods as well as the recent introduction of promising nanomaterials such as conducting polymer nanowires, carbon nanotubes or nanoparticles. As indicated in this review, various immobilization methods have been used to develop optical, electrochemical or gravimetric enzymatic biosensors. The choice of the immobilization method is shown to represent an important parameter that affects biosensor performances, mainly in terms of sensitivity, selectivity and stability, by influencing enzyme orientation, loading, mobility, stability, structure and biological activity. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. Source


Perret F.,CNRS Institute of Molecular and Supramolecular Chemistry and Biochemistry | Coleman A.W.,CNRS Materials Sciences and Technologies Laboratory
Chemical Communications | Year: 2011

This review treats the biological properties of the various anionic calix[n]arenes, both as soluble forms and in the collodal state. The complexation of these molecules with amino-acids, peptides and proteins is discussed, as is their interaction with model membranes. The complexations with various Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients as complexes, for tamoxifen as solid state and colloidal structures, are treated in depth. Two sections deal with the direct biological action of the calix[n]arenes and their use as biosensors. A final section deals with the toxicity, in reality the lack of toxicity of the calix[n]arenes. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry. Source


Guyonnet M.,CNRS Institute of Molecular and Supramolecular Chemistry and Biochemistry | Baudoin O.,CNRS Institute of Molecular and Supramolecular Chemistry and Biochemistry
Organic Letters | Year: 2012

A range of tricyclic nitrogen heterocycles were synthesized in a straightforward and efficient manner via a sequence involving palladium-catalyzed N-arylation and C(sp 3)-H arylation as the key steps. Whereas the C(sp 3)-H arylation furnished fused 6,5,6-membered ring systems efficiently, the formation of the more strained 6,5,5-membered systems proved to be more challenging and required a subtle adjustment of the reaction conditions. © 2011 American Chemical Society. Source

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