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Destercke S.,CNRS Heuristic and Diagnostic Methods for Complex Systems
International Journal of Approximate Reasoning | Year: 2013

In imprecise probability theories, independence modeling and computational tractability are two important issues. The former is essential to work with multiple variables and multivariate spaces, while the latter is essential in practical applications. When using lower probabilities to model uncertainty about the value assumed by a variable, satisfying the property of 2-monotonicity decreases the computational burden of inference, hence answering the latter issue. In a first part, this paper investigates whether the joint uncertainty obtained by main existing notions of independence preserve the 2-monotonicity of marginal models. It is shown that it is usually not the case, except for the formal extension of random set independence to 2-monotone lower probabilities. The second part of the paper explores the properties and interests of this extension within the setting of lower probabilities. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All. Source


Denoeux T.,CNRS Heuristic and Diagnostic Methods for Complex Systems
IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering | Year: 2013

We consider the problem of parameter estimation in statistical models in the case where data are uncertain and represented as belief functions. The proposed method is based on the maximization of a generalized likelihood criterion, which can be interpreted as a degree of agreement between the statistical model and the uncertain observations. We propose a variant of the EM algorithm that iteratively maximizes this criterion. As an illustration, the method is applied to uncertain data clustering using finite mixture models, in the cases of categorical and continuous attributes. © 1989-2012 IEEE. Source


Destercke S.,CNRS Heuristic and Diagnostic Methods for Complex Systems
International Journal of Approximate Reasoning | Year: 2014

This paper is a fine review of various aspects related to the statistical handling of "ontic" random fuzzy sets by the means of appropriate distances. It is quite comprehensive and helpful, as it clarifies the status of fuzzy sets in such methods, explains the advantages of using a distance-based approach, specifies the pitfalls in which one should not fall when dealing with "ontic" random fuzzy sets and provides some illustration of practical computations. Not being a statistician but an occasional user of statistics, my discussion will mainly focus on this more practical aspect. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. Source


Destercke S.,CNRS Heuristic and Diagnostic Methods for Complex Systems
International Journal of Approximate Reasoning | Year: 2014

Eyke Hüllermeier provides a very convincing approach to learn from fuzzy data, both about the model and about the data themselves. In the process, he links the shape of fuzzy sets with classical loss functions, therefore providing strong theoretical links between fuzzy modeling and more classical machine learning approaches. This short note discusses various aspects of his proposal as well as possible extensions. I will first discuss the opportunity to consider more general uncertainty representations, before considering various alternatives to the proposed learning procedure. Finally, I will briefly discuss the differences I perceive about a loss-based and a likelihood-based approach. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. Source


Denoeux T.,CNRS Heuristic and Diagnostic Methods for Complex Systems
International Journal of Approximate Reasoning | Year: 2014

This note is a rejoinder to comments by Dubois and Moral about my paper "Likelihood-based belief function: justification and some extensions to low-quality data" published in this issue. The main comments concern (1) the axiomatic justification for defining a consonant belief function in the parameter space from the likelihood function and (2) the Bayesian treatment of statistical inference from uncertain observations, when uncertainty is quantified by belief functions. Both issues are discussed in this note, in response to the discussants' comments. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. Source

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