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Tore S.,CNR Institute of Population Genetics | Casula S.,CNR Institute of Population Genetics | Casu G.,CNR Institute of Population Genetics | Concas M.P.,CNR Institute of Population Genetics | And 11 more authors.
PLoS Genetics | Year: 2011

In contrast to large GWA studies based on thousands of individuals and large meta-analyses combining GWAS results, we analyzed a small case/control sample for uric acid nephrolithiasis. Our cohort of closely related individuals is derived from a small, genetically isolated village in Sardinia, with well-characterized genealogical data linking the extant population up to the 16th century. It is expected that the number of risk alleles involved in complex disorders is smaller in isolated founder populations than in more diverse populations, and the power to detect association with complex traits may be increased when related, homogeneous affected individuals are selected, as they are more likely to be enriched with and share specific risk variants than are unrelated, affected individuals from the general population. When related individuals are included in an association study, correlations among relatives must be accurately taken into account to ensure validity of the results. A recently proposed association method uses an empirical genotypic covariance matrix estimated from genome-screen data to allow for additional population structure and cryptic relatedness that may not be captured by the genealogical data. We apply the method to our data, and we also investigate the properties of the method, as well as other association methods, in our highly inbred population, as previous applications were to outbred samples. The more promising regions identified in our initial study in the genetic isolate were then further investigated in an independent sample collected from the Italian population. Among the loci that showed association in this study, we observed evidence of a possible involvement of the region encompassing the gene LRRC16A, already associated to serum uric acid levels in a large meta-analysis of 14 GWAS, suggesting that this locus might lead a pathway for uric acid metabolism that may be involved in gout as well as in nephrolithiasis. © 2011 Tore et al.


PubMed | University of Turku, CNR Institute of Neuroscience, Harvard University, Hunter Medical Research Institute and 75 more.
Type: | Journal: Nature communications | Year: 2016

Reduced glomerular filtration rate defines chronic kidney disease and is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), combining data across 133,413 individuals with replication in up to 42,166 individuals. We identify 24 new and confirm 29 previously identified loci. Of these 53 loci, 19 associate with eGFR among individuals with diabetes. Using bioinformatics, we show that identified genes at eGFR loci are enriched for expression in kidney tissues and in pathways relevant for kidney development and transmembrane transporter activity, kidney structure, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Chromatin state mapping and DNase I hypersensitivity analyses across adult tissues demonstrate preferential mapping of associated variants to regulatory regions in kidney but not extra-renal tissues. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of eGFR are mediated largely through direct effects within the kidney and highlight important cell types and biological pathways.


Forabosco P.,CNR Institute of Population Genetics | Ramasamy A.,University College London | Ramasamy A.,King's College London | Trabzuni D.,University College London | And 10 more authors.
Neurobiology of Aging | Year: 2013

Rare variants in TREM2 cause susceptibility to late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Here we use microarray-based expression data generated from 101 neuropathologically normal individuals and covering 10 brain regions, including the hippocampus, to understand TREM2 biology in human brain. Using network analysis, we detect a highly preserved TREM2-containing module in human brain, show that it relates to microglia, and demonstrate that TREM2 is a hub gene in 5 brain regions, including the hippocampus, suggesting that it can drive module function. Using enrichment analysis we show significant overrepresentation of genes implicated in the adaptive and innate immune system. Inspection of genes with the highest connectivity to TREM2 suggests that it plays a key role in mediating changes in the microglial cytoskeleton necessary not only for phagocytosis, but also migration. Most importantly, we show that the TREM2-containing module is significantly enriched for genes genetically implicated in Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and motor neuron disease, implying that these diseases share common pathways centered on microglia and that among the genes identified are possible new disease-relevant genes. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Scott I.C.,King's College London | Seegobin S.D.,King's College London | Steer S.,King's College | Tan R.,King's College London | And 12 more authors.
PLoS Genetics | Year: 2013

The improved characterisation of risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suggests they could be combined to identify individuals at increased disease risks in whom preventive strategies may be evaluated. We aimed to develop an RA prediction model capable of generating clinically relevant predictive data and to determine if it better predicted younger onset RA (YORA). Our novel modelling approach combined odds ratios for 15 four-digit/10 two-digit HLA-DRB1 alleles, 31 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and ever-smoking status in males to determine risk using computer simulation and confidence interval based risk categorisation. Only males were evaluated in our models incorporating smoking as ever-smoking is a significant risk factor for RA in men but not women. We developed multiple models to evaluate each risk factor's impact on prediction. Each model's ability to discriminate anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA)-positive RA from controls was evaluated in two cohorts: Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC: 1,516 cases; 1,647 controls); UK RA Genetics Group Consortium (UKRAGG: 2,623 cases; 1,500 controls). HLA and smoking provided strongest prediction with good discrimination evidenced by an HLA-smoking model area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.813 in both WTCCC and UKRAGG. SNPs provided minimal prediction (AUC 0.660 WTCCC/0.617 UKRAGG). Whilst high individual risks were identified, with some cases having estimated lifetime risks of 86%, only a minority overall had substantially increased odds for RA. High risks from the HLA model were associated with YORA (P<0.0001); ever-smoking associated with older onset disease. This latter finding suggests smoking's impact on RA risk manifests later in life. Our modelling demonstrates that combining risk factors provides clinically informative RA prediction; additionally HLA and smoking status can be used to predict the risk of younger and older onset RA, respectively. © 2013 Scott et al.


PubMed | The Optima, University of Nottingham, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, University of Bristol and 19 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nature | Year: 2014

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several risk variants for late-onset Alzheimers disease (LOAD). These common variants have replicable but small effects on LOAD risk and generally do not have obvious functional effects. Low-frequency coding variants, not detected by GWAS, are predicted to include functional variants with larger effects on risk. To identify low-frequency coding variants with large effects on LOAD risk, we carried out whole-exome sequencing (WES) in 14 large LOAD families and follow-up analyses of the candidate variants in several large LOAD case-control data sets. A rare variant in PLD3 (phospholipase D3; Val232Met) segregated with disease status in two independent families and doubled risk for Alzheimers disease in seven independent case-control series with a total of more than 11,000 cases and controls of European descent. Gene-based burden analyses in 4,387 cases and controls of European descent and 302 African American cases and controls, with complete sequence data for PLD3, reveal that several variants in this gene increase risk for Alzheimers disease in both populations. PLD3 is highly expressed in brain regions that are vulnerable to Alzheimers disease pathology, including hippocampus and cortex, and is expressed at significantly lower levels in neurons from Alzheimers disease brains compared to control brains. Overexpression of PLD3 leads to a significant decrease in intracellular amyloid- precursor protein (APP) and extracellular A42 and A40 (the 42- and 40-residue isoforms of the amyloid- peptide), and knockdown of PLD3 leads to a significant increase in extracellular A42 and A40. Together, our genetic and functional data indicate that carriers of PLD3 coding variants have a twofold increased risk for LOAD and that PLD3 influences APP processing. This study provides an example of how densely affected families may help to identify rare variants with large effects on risk for disease or other complex traits.


PubMed | U.S. National Institute on Aging, University of Edinburgh, King Faisal Specialist Hospital And Research Center, Queen Mary, University of London and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Multiple sclerosis and related disorders | Year: 2015

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common disease of the central nervous system and a major cause of disability amongst young adults. Genome-wide association studies have identified many novel susceptibility loci including rs2248359. We hypothesized that genotypes of this locus could increase the risk of MS by regulating expression of neighboring gene, We investigated this hypothesis using paired gene expression and genotyping data from three independent datasets of neurologically healthy adults of European descent. The UK Brain Expression Consortium (UKBEC) consists of post-mortem samples across 10 brain regions originating from 134 individuals (1231 samples total). The North American Brain Expression Consortium (NABEC) consists of cerebellum and frontal cortex samples from 304 individuals (605 samples total). The brain dataset from Heinzen and colleagues consists of prefrontal cortex samples from 93 individuals. Additionally, we used gene network analysis to analyze UKBEC expression data to understand The risk allele, rs2248359-C, is strongly associated with increased expression of The known MS risk allele rs2248359-C increases Medical Research Council UK; King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Saudi Arabia; Intramural Research Program of the National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, USA.

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