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News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Aviva Woman, located in Salt Lake City, Utah, celebrated its Grand Opening on Friday, May 5th. Aviva Woman is the only clinic in the nation to focus solely on a woman's intimate needs, mentally, emotionally, and physically. Their team is made up of women who have experienced the personal, intimate issues they now treat. They draw upon this experience to fuel their passion for helping their guests. Aviva Woman proudly stands as a For Women and By Women company. “There are no other ‘like’ practices in the area. But what certainly sets us apart is we are run by women, for women. We address those intimate needs that are often brushed over in a doctor’s office because there’s either a lack of time, or a lack of knowledge about what can be done for the complaints that the women have,” explains Teresa Blair DNP, CNM, WHNP | Medical Director. “We are very personal, we always have very personal introductions, and we allow you that comfort and time that helps you to open up and talk for us to be able to fully address your needs. It’s a very warm and comfortable environment – both through the furnishings, the people who are here and the time allowed to talk about those concerns.” Aviva Woman focuses on three areas of treatment for its guests—Mental Wellness, Physical Wellness, and Intimate Wellness. Mental Wellness Therapists provide evaluation, counseling, and treatment for many challenges that affect women at every phase of life. Areas of focus include anxiety, depression, sexuality, trauma, and overall mental wellness. Physical Wellness is addressed with revolutionary radio-frequency treatments called ThermiSmooth® Face. This non-invasive, non-surgical, pain-free treatment smooths fine facial lines to reduce the effects of aging and increase confidence. Intimate Wellness is addressed with a similar, ground-breaking radio-frequency treatment. Like ThermiSmooth® Face, ThermiVa® is non-invasive and pain-free. It does not require surgery and there is no down-time after the treatment. ThermiVa® is an FDA and clinically-approved vaginal rejuvenation technology. “No matter what issue a woman is experiencing, she may have concerns or apprehensions about the recommended procedure or approach. But allaying those concerns is perhaps best done through education,” says Blair. “As Provider and Medical Director, I’m doing the procedures and I feel that education is at the forefront of helping to ease someone’s concerns. So, I show them the devices or equipment being used; I will talk them through the procedure, explaining it prior to starting and explaining it as we go through each step. Having a gentle touch and being a woman myself, I have that understanding of what some of those sensations are so I can talk them through that. When people understand what’s going on they can feel confident, ask questions, and know what to expect without having any surprises.” To learn more about Aviva Woman, please visit avivawoman.com. info(at)avivawoman(dot)com Office: (801) 618-1489 999 E. Murray Holladay Rd. Suite 204 Salt Lake City, Utah 84117


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

CNM Auto Repair (https://www.cnmautorepair.com) is excited to announce the launch of a new website to better serve their customers in the greater Lancaster, Pennsylvania area. CNM Auto Repair is a full-service auto center offering preventive maintenance and automotive repair services for domestic and foreign vehicles including cars, SUVs, trucks, and fleet vehicles. On the new site, customers can find helpful information including hours, directions, contact information, services, and honest, genuine customer reviews, while also having the option to schedule their next service. CNM Auto Repair is family owned and operative, using state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment from trusted companies like Interstate Batteries, Snap on, Autel, Jasper Engines and Transmissions, AutoPart International, Nexen, Flowmaster and Cooper. In addition, CNM Auto Repair is conveniently located in downtown Lancaster and offers free shuttle services, secure after hours drop offs, and free Wi-Fi. The goal at CNM Auto Repair promises premium quality parts and competitive pricing that customers can trust for all their auto maintenance and repair needs. With this goal in mind, CNM Auto Repair guarantees customers’ vehicles are serviced properly so as not to void any manufacturers’ warranties in place. Additionally, CNM Auto Repair’s expert technicians are ASE-Certified. On the newly launched CNM Auto Repair website, visitors can see a list of services provided – alignments, suspension work, steering, brakes, diagnostics, programming, electrical, tune-ups, oil changes, exhausts, catalytic converters, window motors, tires, and more – each with links to full description of the scope of work performed as well as the ability to easily make appointments for maintenance and repairs. Also on the site are real customer reviews from Google+, Facebook, and Yelp* as well as blogs that offer tips for ongoing car care and even community events. "I'm very excited about the launch of our new, mobile friendly website. Customers will now be able to learn more about who we are, what services we offer, and even schedule their appointment online, no matter what device they are using," - Chris Laboy, Owner, CNM Auto Repair. On the newly launched CNM Auto Repair website, visitors will discover the difference and research auto repairs and maintenance options while reading genuine customer reviews. At CNM Auto Repair, customers will find the best in service and premium parts delivered by expert, certified technicians! Stop in or visit http://www.cnmautorepair.com and discover the difference of the quality, personal, auto repair and maintenance service at CNM Auto Repair in the heart of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Bio: CNM Auto Repair is a family owned and operated auto repair shop, founded by Chris Laboy, and proudly serving the Lancaster, Pennsylvania area. Offering state-of-the-art diagnostics and premium parts, CNM Auto Repair promises exceptional customer service by certified technicians designed to keep vehicles up-to-date and operating with great performance. Visit http://www.cnmautorepair.com and schedule your service, maintenance, or repair with confidence.


WASHINGTON, DC--(Marketwired - December 12, 2016) - Four organizations announced today they are forming a new, multi-stakeholder collaboration, Xcertia, dedicated to improving the quality, safety, and effectiveness of mobile health applications (apps). The initial supporters of the collaboration include the American Heart Association (AHA), the American Medical Association (AMA), DHX Group, and the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS). As a nonprofit corporation, Xcertia will establish and promote best practices for mobile health apps. Xcertia's membership and governing board will be open to broad representation from consumers, developers, payers, clinicians, academia and others with an interest in the development of guidelines for mobile health apps. "The collaboration builds on each organization's ongoing efforts to foster safe, effective, and reputable health technologies, while complementing our mutual commitment to advancing innovation in medicine, and improving the health of the nation," said Xcertia's four founders. "Our combined expertise, along with a diverse membership, will leverage the insights of clinicians, patients and industry experts to help improve patient care and increase access to data." Xcertia will respond to the critical need for a comprehensive effort to develop a framework of principles that will positively impact the trajectory of the mobile health app industry. Xcertia's guidelines will also be a resource to support consumer and clinician choice of mobile health apps. This collaborative effort will incorporate feedback from its members in a consensus-driven process to advance the body of knowledge around clinical content, usability, privacy and security, interoperability and evidence of efficacy. Xcertia will not engage in certifying mobile health apps, but will encourage others to apply its principles and guidelines in the development and curation of safe and effective mobile health apps. Xcertia invites other organizations in the patient, technology and other health care communities to join the collaboration and add their expertise to the development of guidelines for mobile health apps. To join AHA, AMA, DHX Group, and HIMSS in this collaborative effort, go to the Xcertia website at www.xcertia.org for more details. Editor's Note: The following selection of quotes has been drawn from the four founders of the new industry collaboration. American Heart Association "Today's announcement, and the founding of Xcertia with our co-founders, represents a significant first step to bringing meaningful clarity and focus to evaluation within the mHealth space," said Dr. Eric Peterson, chairperson of the American Heart Association's Center for Health Technology & Innovation. "The AHA is an evidence based organization, so we can add an emphasis on evaluation that is critical for the mHealth space to realize its full potential and, truly, deliver better outcomes for patients." American Medical Association "Physicians recognize the tremendous potential in digital health tools and are looking to the AMA to help make sense of mobile health technologies," said AMA Executive Vice President and CEO James L. Madara, M.D. "Our role in helping to form Xcertia underscores the AMA's ongoing commitment to innovation and collaboration that helps empower patients to assess mobile health apps, and enable physicians to take a lead role in advancing the state of digital health technology." DHX Group "After years of pioneering the art and science of mobile health app curation, DHX Group is pleased to join forces with our Xcertia co-founders to spark an industry movement in establishing guidelines to help patients in the selection and use of appropriate and secure mobile health apps," said DHX Group Founder and Chairman David Vinson. Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society "Secure, real-time access to accurate electronic health information gives consumers, patients, and clinicians the knowledge needed to make informed health-related decisions. As a founding organization of Xcertia, HIMSS extends its commitment to improving health and healthcare through the best use of IT by championing the creation of guidelines for mobile health apps. With safe, effective, and reputable mobile health apps, clinicians, caregivers, consumers, and patients can better manage care, and maintain their wellness," said Carla Smith, MA, FHIMSS, CNM, executive vice president, HIMSS.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Today, Jones & Bartlett Learning announced a new partnership with the American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) to publish Midwifery & Women's Health Nurse Practitioner Certification Review Guide, Fourth Edition by Beth M. Kelsey and Jamille Nagtalon-Ramos. The reference, due out in May 2017, is a comprehensive review designed to help student midwives and women’s health nurse practitioners prepare for certification exams. “We are excited to enter into this partnership with ACNM to create a product that will benefit the midwifery community and help students take that next step in their careers.” - Teresa Reilly, Acquisitions Editor, Jones & Bartlett Learning Based on the American Midwifery Certification Board (AMCB) and the National Certification Corporation (NCC) test blueprints, Midwifery & Women's Health Nurse Practitioner Certification Review Guide, Fourth Edition contains nearly 1,000 questions with answers and rationales representing those found on the exams. The Fourth Edition includes a new chapter on well woman care: menopause and older women. “Written and reviewed by experts in the fields of midwifery and women's health, this resource provides a comprehensive review that students will find invaluable as they prepare for the certification exam. Students using this resource will gain a boost in knowledge and confidence, and program faculty will want to recommend this resource that is well-aligned with the standards and competencies necessary for professional practice.” - Kate Woeber, CNM, MPH, Clinical Instructor, Emory University Each new print copy includes Navigate 2 Preferred Access, which unlocks a comprehensive and interactive eBook, and Navigate 2 TestPrep. Jones & Bartlett Learning is a world-leading provider of instructional, assessment, and learning-performance management solutions for the secondary education, post-secondary education, and professional markets. Jones & Bartlett Learning develops educational programs and services that improve learning outcomes and enhance student achievement by combining authoritative content written by respected authors with innovative, proven, and engaging technology applications that meet the diverse needs of today's instructors, students, and professionals. For more information on Jones & Bartlett Learning, visit http://www.jblearning.com. ACNM is the professional association that represents the United States’ nearly 12,000 certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) and certified midwives (CMs). ACNM promotes excellence in midwifery education, clinical practice, and research. With roots dating to 1929, their members are primary care providers for women throughout the lifespan, with a special emphasis on pregnancy, childbirth, and gynecologic and reproductive health. ACNM provides research, administers and promotes continuing education programs, establishes clinical practice standards, and creates liaisons with state and federal agencies and members of Congress to increase the visibility and recognition of midwifery care. For more information on ACNM, visit http://www.midwife.org.


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Florida Hospital Physician Group (FHPG) is pleased to announce the addition of their first employed Certified Nurse Midwife, Gaye Ficarrotta, CNM, IBCLC, to Florida Hospital Physician Group. Gaye has over a decade's experience caring for women in the North Pinellas area and provides comprehensive obstetrical and well-woman care. She concentrates on quality, personalized care that truly focuses on the individual, helping each patient feel confident and comfortable throughout her healthcare experience. Gaye has delivered just under 1,000 babies in her years as a Certified Nurse Midwife and had 10 years of labor and delivery experience as a hospital staff nurse prior to becoming a CNM. She is also an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC). Gaye earned her Master’s in Nursing from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio before obtaining her Certificate in Nurse Midwifery from the Frontier School of Midwifery and Family Nursing in Hyden, Kentucky. She began practicing midwifery in the Palm Harbor area in 1995 and has been caring for patients locally ever since. Her areas of specialty include full scope nurse midwifery care, well-woman care, family planning & counseling, labor & delivery and lactation consulting. Florida Hospital Physician Group providers and staff focus on compassionate, whole-person care with extensive knowledge and expertise to diagnose and treat medical conditions with a patient-focused approach. “We are very excited to have Gaye join FHPG to provide quality and compassionate obstetric and gynecological care for women in the North Pinellas community,” shared Chris Jenkins, President of Florida Hospital Physician Group. “As our first employed Certified Nurse Midwife, Gaye helps us provide personalized care for patients who prefer the care of a CNM, continuing our role as a leader in the community providing the best possible OB/GYN services for our patients.” Gaye Ficarrotta is located at 4705 Alternate 19, Suite B, Palm Harbor, FL 34683, and is currently accepting new patients. For more information, or to schedule an appointment, please call (727) 935-6477 or visit http://www.NorthPinellasWomensCare.com. About Florida Hospital Physician Group Florida Hospital Physician Group (FHPG) is a multi-specialty physician group, dedicated to improving the health and wellness of communities throughout the greater Tampa Bay region with more than 130 providers operating in over 40 locations representing over 25 medical specialties. FHPG offers patients the highest level of compassionate and multidisciplinary care through a broad range of medical and surgical services, as well as direct access to five local Florida Hospitals, a Long Term Acute Care facility, imaging centers, specialty and urgent care centers, rehabilitation facilities and home care agencies located throughout Hillsborough, Pasco and Pinellas counties. Part of the Adventist Health System, Florida Hospital is a leading health network comprised of 26 hospitals throughout the state. For more information, visit http://www.FHPhysicianGroup.com.


News Article | September 19, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

Graphene is the stuff of the future. For years, researchers and technologists have been predicting the utility of the one-atom-thick sheets of pure carbon in everything from advanced touch screens and semiconductors to long-lasting batteries and next-generation solar cells. But graphene's unique intrinsic properties – supreme electrical and thermal conductivities and remarkable electron mobility, to name just a few – can only be fully realized if it is grown free from defects that disrupt the honeycomb pattern of the bound carbon atoms. A team led by Materials Scientist Anirudha Sumant with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory's Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) and Materials Science Division, along with collaborators at the University of California-Riverside, has developed a method to grow graphene that contains relatively few impurities and costs less to make, in a shorter time and at lower temperatures compared to the processes widely used to make graphene today. Theoretical work led by Argonne nanoscientist Subramanian Sankaranarayanan at the CNM helped researchers understand the molecular-level processes underlying the graphene growth. "I'd been dealing with all these different techniques of growing graphene, and you never see such a uniform, smooth surface." The new technology taps ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD), a synthetic type of diamond that Argonne researchers have pioneered through years of research. UNCD serves as a physical substrate, or surface on which the graphene grows, and the source for the carbon atoms that make up a rapidly produced graphene sheet. "When I first looked at the [scanning electron micrograph] and saw this nice uniform, very complete layer, it was amazing," said Diana Berman, the first author of the study and former postdoctoral research associate who worked with Sumant and is now an Assistant Professor at the University of North Texas. "I'd been dealing with all these different techniques of growing graphene, and you never see such a uniform, smooth surface." Current graphene fabrication protocols introduce impurities during the etching process itself, which involves adding acid and extra polymers, and when they are transferred to a different substrate for use in electronics. "The impurities introduced during this etching and the transferring step negatively affect the electronic properties of the graphene," Sumant said. "So you do not get the intrinsic properties of the graphene when you actually do this transfer." The team found that the single-layer, single-domain graphene can be grown over micron-size holes laterally, making them completely free-standing (that is, detached from the underlying substrate). This makes it possible to exploit the intrinsic properties of graphene by fabricating devices directly over free-standing graphene. The new process is also much more cost-effective than conventional methods based on using silicon carbide as a substrate. Sumant says that the 3- to 4-inch silicon carbide wafers used in these types of growth methods cost about $1,200, while UNCD films on silicon wafers cost less than $500 to make. The diamond method also takes less than a minute to grow a sheet of graphene, where the conventional method takes on the order of hours. The high quality of graphene was confirmed by the UC Riverside co-authors Zhong Yan and Alexander Balandin by fabricating top-gate field-effect transistors from this material and measuring its electron mobility and charge carrier concentration. "It is well known that certain metals, such as nickel and iron, dissolve diamond at elevated temperatures, and the same process has been used for many years to polish diamond," said Sumant. He and his team used this property to employ nickel in converting the top layer of diamond into amorphous carbon, but it was not clear how these freed carbon atoms converted instantly into high-quality graphene. After Sumant's and Berman's initial breakthrough of growing graphene directly on UNCD, Sankaranarayanan and his postdocs Badri Narayanan and Sanket Deshmukh, computational material scientists at the CNM used resources at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) to help the team better understand the mechanism of the growth process underlying this interesting phenomenon using reactive molecular dynamic simulations. Computer simulations developed by Narayanan, Deshmukh and Sankaranarayanan showed that certain crystallographic orientation of nickel-111 highly favor nucleation, and subsequent rapid growth of graphene; this was then confirmed experimentally. These large-scale simulations also showed how graphene forms. The nickel atoms diffuse into the diamond and destroy its crystalline order, while carbon atoms from this amorphous solid move to the nickel surface and rapidly form honeycomb-like structures, resulting in mostly defect-free graphene. The nickel then percolated through the fine crystalline grains of the UNCD, sinking out of the way and removing the need for acid to dissolve away excess metal atoms from the top surface. "It is like meeting a good Samaritan at an unknown place who helps you, does his job and leaves quietly without a trace," said Sumant. "The proven predictive power of our simulations places us in a position of advantage to enable rapid discovery of new catalytic alloys that mediate growth of high-quality graphene on dielectrics and move away on their own when the growth is completed," added Narayanan. In addition to the utility in making minimally defective, application-ready graphene for things like low-frequency vibration sensors, radio frequency transistors and better electrodes for water purification, Berman and Sumant say that the Argonne team has already secured three patents arising from their new graphene growth method. The researchers have already struck a collaboration with Swedish Institute of Space Physics involving the European Space Agency for their Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE) program to develop graphene-coated probes that may help exploratory vehicles sense the properties of plasma surrounding the moons of Jupiter. Closer to home, the team has also crafted diamond and graphene needles for researchers at North Carolina University to use in biosensing applications. The Argonne researchers are now fine-tuning the process – tweaking the temperature used to catalyze the reaction and adjusting the thickness of the diamond substrate and the composition of the metal film that facilitates the graphene growth – to both optimize the reaction and to better study the physics at the graphene-diamond interface. "We're trying to tune this more carefully to have a better understanding of which conditions lead to what quality of graphene we're seeing," Berman said. Other Argonne authors involved in the study were Alexander Zinovev and Daniel Rosenmann. The paper, "Metal-induced rapid transformation of diamond into single and multilayer graphene on wafer scale," is published inNature Communications.


News Article | November 18, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

They say diamonds are forever, but diamonds in fact are a metastable form of carbon that will slowly but eventually transform into graphite, another form of carbon. Being able to design and synthesize other long-lived, thermodynamically metastable materials could be a potential gold mine for materials designers, but until now, scientists lacked a rational understanding of them. Now researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have published a new study that, for the first time, explicitly quantifies the thermodynamic scale of metastability for almost 30,000 known materials. This paves the way for designing and making promising next-generation materials for use in everything from semiconductors to pharmaceuticals to steels. "There's a great amount of possibility in the space of metastable materials, but when experimentalists go to the lab to make them, the process is very heuristic--it's trial and error," said Berkeley Lab researcher Wenhao Sun. "What we've done in this research is to understand the metastable phases that have been made, so that we can better understand which metastable phases can be made." The research was published last week in the journal Science Advances in a paper titled, "The Thermodynamic Scale of Inorganic Crystalline Metastability." Sun, a postdoctoral fellow working with Gerbrand Ceder in Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division, was the lead author, and Ceder was the corresponding author. The study involved large-scale data mining of the Materials Project, which is a Google-like database of materials that uses supercomputers to calculate properties based on first-principles quantum-mechanical frameworks. The Materials Project, directed by Berkeley Lab researcher Kristin Persson, who was also a co-author of the new paper, has calculated properties of more than 67,000 known and predicted materials with the goal of accelerating materials discovery and innovation. "Materials design and development is truly a slow process but is now being greatly accelerated by the fact that we can compute properties of compounds before they are made," Ceder said. "Although we still don't fully understand which materials can be made and how, mapping the underlying thermodynamics is an important first step." Metastable materials, or materials that transform to another state over a long period of time, are ubiquitous in both nature and technology and often have superior properties. Chocolate, for example, is metastable, with a lower melting point and better texture than stable chocolate. There are also metastable steels that have both toughness and strength, properties not normally found simultaneously in most stable steels. Scientists would love to develop new materials with certain properties for various applications--an ultra-strong yet lightweight metal for vehicles, for example--but to make any new material with desired properties, materials scientists must understand how synthesizing the material influences its structure, and then how the structure in turn affects its properties and performance. This, Sun explains, is the fundamental paradigm of materials science. "The Materials Project has helped us link a material's structure to its properties," Ceder said. "What we've done here is the first quantitative step in understanding synthesis-structure relationships." Sun offers an analogy to food: "If the Materials Project were a cookbook, it'd be like a database of ingredients and delicious dishes but no recipes. Designing recipes is difficult because scientists have a poor understanding of why metastable phases appear during 'cooking.' There are some applications where a metastable material is better, and others where the stable phases are better. This study sets a foundation to investigate how to use computers to predict recipes." Previously, scientists had thermodynamic numbers for less than 1,000 metastable compounds. "It's very hard to survey metastability over known materials because there's not much data out there in terms of calorimetry, which is measuring thermodynamic numbers," Sun said. What's more, metastable materials come in many forms, spanning metal alloys and minerals to ceramics, salts, and more, making a comprehensive survey difficult. "What we've done is large-scale data mining on nearly 30,000 observed materials to explicitly measure the thermodynamic scale of metastability, as a function of a wide variety of parameters, like chemistry and composition, which inorganic chemists and materials scientists can use to build intuition," Sun said. Based on their observations, the researchers went a step further, to propose a new principle they term "remnant metastability" to explain which metastable materials can be synthesized and which cannot. "We're essentially proposing search criteria¬?we're identifying which crystalline materials can be made, and possibly under what conditions they can be made," Sun said. "We hope this can be a more refined way to think about which crystal structure nature chooses when a material forms." The other co-authors of the paper are: Anubhav Jain of Berkeley Lab, Stephen Dacek and William Richards of MIT, Shyue Ping Ong and Anthony Gamst of UC San Diego, and Geoffroy Hautier of the Université Catholique de Louvain in Belgium. The research was supported by the Materials Project and was a collaboration with the DOE's Office of Science as part of its Center for Next Generation of Materials by Design, a DOE Energy Frontier Research Center. The researchers also used computing resources at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) at Argonne National Laboratory and well as resources at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. CNM and CFN are DOE Office of Science User Facilities. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addresses the world's most urgent scientific challenges by advancing sustainable energy, protecting human health, creating new materials, and revealing the origin and fate of the universe. Founded in 1931, Berkeley Lab's scientific expertise has been recognized with 13 Nobel prizes. The University of California manages Berkeley Lab for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. For more, visit http://www. . DOE's Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit science.energy.gov.


News Article | December 9, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

WOODLAND HILLS, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Robert Conway, Professional Practices Director at CNM LLP, has been published in Compliance Week, the leading information service on corporate governance, risk, and compliance. His article “The PCAOB Must Provide Better Guidance for ICFR” can be found in the November 22nd, 2016 issue of Compliance Week. Conway explains that public companies are at a disadvantage when it comes to understanding the demanding and evolving expectations of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (“PCAOB”) for audits of public company internal controls over financial reporting (“ICFR”). Auditors learn about those demanding expectations directly from the PCAOB’s rigorous inspection process, while public companies get the message second hand from their auditors. This paradigm has created unnecessary tension between auditors and their clients as to the scope of work and the documentation required to evidence that controls are operating effectively. Conway makes a compelling case for the PCAOB to level the playing field by providing uniform guidance to both auditors and public companies. Robert Conway, prior to joining CNM, completed nine years at the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB), including six years as a Regional Associate Director with leadership responsibility for the organization’s Orange County and Los Angeles offices. Prior to the PCAOB, Conway enjoyed a 26-year career with KPMG, including 17 years as audit partner. At KPMG, Conway specialized in audits of companies in the technology, pharmaceutical, automotive, manufacturing, retailing, and transportation industries. Founded in 2003, CNM LLP is a specialized accounting consulting firm that provides high value advisory services to assist companies with technical accounting, IT, internal control and tax services. From entrepreneurial startups to Fortune 500 companies, CNM’s personal and engaged approach solves complex accounting and process problems.


Collaboration combines Maternova's global reach in obstetric and Philips solutions specifically designed for healthcare settings. ​Philips Africa Innovation Hub and Maternova Inc. today signed an agreement accelerating the distribution of Philips’ innovative newborn and child health solutions in collaboration with Maternova.  The agreement initiates sales programs in Latin America, Africa and certain markets in Asia for Philips’ portable power independent Fetal Heart Rate Monitor. The Philips solutions are packaged as part of the Maternova Safe Obstetric Solution (SOS) kits that offer lifesaving solutions for childbirth settings that are often extremely challenging due to rugged conditions, inadequate lighting, lack of electricity and limited availability of local healthcare resources. The Safe Obstetric Solution Kit delivers lifesaving vital signs monitoring and postpartum hemorrhage control.  It combines a maternal heart rate and blood pressure monitoring cuff with Philips’ Fetal Heart Rate Monitor (hyperlink to website) to deliver a comprehensive solution for assessing the health of the mother and baby during antenatal care visits through childbirth. The Maternova SOS solution simplifies and enables the concurrent monitoring of mother and baby during the stress of labor and delivery.  The portable, power independent Philips Fetal Heart Rate Monitor (FHRM) is an innovative new monitoring solution that works using a built-in hand crank to power the device so it does not require batteries or electricity.   This solution addresses the need for an effective, lightweight and portable solution that can be used by healthcare professionals from midwives to obstetricians in situations where self-sufficiency and portability are essential to effective patient care. “The Philips Fetal Heart Rate Monitor (FHRM) will work well for clinical care in the hospitals and mobile clinics in places like Haiti.” said Cynthia Siegel, RN, CNM, Director of Midwifery Education, Midwives for Haiti. “We have used it to monitor patients ranging from ten weeks to full-term pregnancies, and it performs extremely well." “This agreement with Maternova underscores Philips’ commitment to co-create new solutions, new business models and new delivery paradigms to provide innovations that make an impact; innovations that enhance clinical outcomes and patient safety.” said Niels Buning, Venture Manager – Philips Africa Innovation Hub.  “Though developed in Africa, for Africa, the FHRM can address demand in a vast majority of low resource settings across the globe.” “It’s wonderful that Maternova and Philips will be collaborating for the benefit of patients and clinicians around the world,” said, Meg Wirth CEO of Maternova. “I am delighted that we were able to reach this important agreement.  We see demand for rugged, effective and innovative maternal, newborn and child health innovations growing in all corners of the world.” Philips is a global leader in patient monitoring solutions with a comprehensive product portfolio ranging from multi-parameter bedside monitors to wearable patient monitors combined with mobile applications and clinical decision support tools. With a primary focus on prediction and prevention of patient deterioration, these integrated solutions aim to support clinical workflow and caregiver efficiencies, and enhance patient care. The Philips Africa Innovation Hub in Nairobi, Kenya, is the center for developing innovations “in Africa-for Africa” focused on improving people’s health and enabling better outcomes across the health continuum from healthy living and prevention, to diagnosis, treatment and home care. Maternova is a women’s health solutions company, committed to accelerating the distribution of innovative, proven, lifesaving technologies to healthcare professionals in Africa, Latin America, and key markets in Asia through its local partners, distributors and its website www.maternova.net . Information on the SOS Solutions Kits can be found at: https://maternova.net/collections/frontpage/products/sos-safe-obstetric-solution-backpack


News Article | September 23, 2016
Site: www.materialstoday.com

Membranes made from carbon nanomaterials like graphene or nanotubes could make fresh drinking water more available to more people – especially in developing countries. To make this happen, progress is needed to solve the physical factors that limit the removal of impurities, membranes must be scaled up to industrial levels, and costs have to come down, according to scientists Kunli Goh and Rong Wang from Nanyang Technical University in Singapore and Yuan Chen from the University of Sydney in Australia [Goh et al., Carbon 109 (2016) 694]. “Membrane technology has a very important role to play in achieving [fresh water security],” says Wang. “However, conventional polymeric membranes are facing several material-related limitations.” Separation membranes based on polymers are widespread in the production of demineralized or potable water, as well as in pharmaceutical and food production. In more specialist niche sectors, ceramic membranes can have advantages. But carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) have exceptional – and unique – water transport and sieving properties that could allow them to take over from polymeric membranes. “CNMs hold promise to transcend limitations owing to their atomically smooth graphitic surfaces and unique structural and water transport properties,” explains Chen. It is possible to create very small and well-defined pores in very thin layers of these materials that very effectively filter out and separate impurities. CNMs are also antimicrobial and can help address one of the key limitations of conventional membranes – fouling, which is the build-up of impurities like bacteria, fungi or other particles on the membrane surface. Membranes made from these novel materials could have an added advantage. Because CNMs are conductive and easy to functionalize with other species, it is possible to imagine ‘smart’ membranes that not only intrinsically monitor fouling but also electrostatically ‘self-clean’ their surface. “These [factors] suggest that [CNMs] can be used in more robust membranes to tackle more polluted water and hostile separation applications involving high pH, high temperatures, and organic solvents,” says Goh. But despite the enormous promise of CNMs, there are some crucial issues to be overcome. Although almost ‘ideal’ membranes can be made from single sheets of graphene or aligned forests of nanotubes, they are difficult to fabricate – especially on larger scales. More practical options – based on graphene composites or randomly aligned nanotubes – still need to be stable, robust, and cost effective. CNM membranes could fill the gap between polymer and ceramic membranes, suggest Wang and Chen. But to unleash the full potential of CNM-based membranes, research needs to move away from creating evermore ‘ideal’ ultrapermeable membranes to more practical issues like stability, scalability, safety, and cost.

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