Cluj County Emergency Hospital

Cluj County, Romania

Cluj County Emergency Hospital

Cluj County, Romania
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Benga G.,Cluj County Emergency Hospital | Benga G.,Vasile Goldis Western University of Arad | Benga G.,Romanian Academy of Sciences | Benga G.,Gheorghe Benga Foundation and The Outnobel Foundation
Acta Endocrinologica | Year: 2014

The water channels milestones include: the vague idea of "hydrophilic pores" or "water-filled channels" in the red blood cell (RBC), the proposal that water channels (WCh) are accommodated in proteins, experiments associating WCh with the major RBC membrane protein called Band 3 (the anion exchanger), and the crucial experiment performed in 1985 by Benga group in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, proving the presence and location of a minor protein of the RBC membrane involved in water transport. In the landmark papers of 1986, Benga introduced the concept of the WCh being a protein specialized in water transport, i.e. a water channel protein (WCP). The first WCP discovered by our group was re-discovered in 1992 by Agre group. In the same year two other WCPs were discovered. The name aquaporins was proposed in 1993. In subsequent years hundreds of WCPS have been discovered in organisms from all kingdoms of life. WCPs are a family of membrane proteins, belonging to the Membrane Intrinsic Proteins superfamily. WCPs family include three subfamilies: 1) aquaporins (AQPs) which are mainly water selective channels; 2) aquaglyceroporins are permeable to water and to other small uncharged molecules; 3) S-aquaporins (subcellular or superaquaporins). Benga called aquaglyceroporins and S-aquaporins the "relatives of aquaporins". Twelve WCPs were identified in the human body, having a great importance in a lot of physiological phenomena, as well as in pathological conditions, from well defined "water channelopathies" to a wide range of diseases. Benga propose the name of aquaporinology for the domain of biomedical and natural sciences dedicated to the integrated approach of WCPs (aquaporins and relatives), which is also a chapter of Cellular and Molecular Biology.


Frentescu L.,Victor Babes University of Medicine and Pharmacy Timisoara | Frentescu L.,Cluj County Emergency Hospital | Budisan L.,Cluj County Emergency Hospital | Benga G.,Cluj County Emergency Hospital | And 4 more authors.
Acta Endocrinologica | Year: 2013

Aim. To correlate the profile of CFTR gene mutations in patients from Romania with the ethnogenesis of Rumanian people. Patients and methods. One hundred sixty-five patients with clinical diagnosis of CF and elevated values at sweat test were included in the study. Samples of EDTA-anticoagulated blood were obtained by venipuncture, sent to our laboratory and DNA was extracted from leukocytes. For the majority of blood samples we used standardized methods for analysis of at least 18 common mutations. Ten DNA samples were analyzed for 38 CFTR mutations with a kit recently introduced in our program of investigations of CFTR gene mutations.Results. The most frequent mutations in CF patients from Romania are F508del (53.6%), G542X (4.6%), W1282X (2.1%) and CFTRdele2,3(21kb) (1.2%). Other mutations were detected at frequencies less than 1.0%. The profile of the CFTR gene mutations in Rumanian patients appears to be very different from its counterpart profile in Romania's neighbour countries and rather similar with the profile of mutations in France, Italy and Spain (which, similar to Romania, are Neo-Latin countries). A notable difference between Romania and these Neo-Latin countries is the presence of a Slavic mutation, CFTRdele2,3(21kb) in Rumanian patients; this might reflect the Slavic component in the ethnogenesis of Rumanian people.Conclusion. The profile of the CFTR gene mutations in Rumanian patients confirms the overwhelming evidence regarding the ethnogenesis of Rumanian people from the admixture of Dacians or Getae (the ancient autochtonous inhabitants of the territory of present-day Romania) with Roman (or Romanized) legionnaires and colonists, forming the Daco-Roman population (the basis of Rumanian people), who assimilated the Slavs that entered in the territory of present-day Romania in the VIth century.


Fanea L.,Babes - Bolyai University | David L.I.,Babes - Bolyai University | Lebovici A.,Cluj County Emergency Hospital | Carbone F.,University of Salerno | Sfrangeu S.A.,Cluj County Emergency Hospital
Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine | Year: 2012

Neurological disorders represent major causes of lost years of healthy life and mortality worldwide. Development of their quantitative interdisciplinary in vivo evaluation is required. Compartment modeling (CM) of brain data acquired in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging techniques with clinically available contrast agents can be performed to quantitatively assess brain perfusion. Transport of 1H spins in water molecules across physiological compartmental brain barriers in three different pools was mathematically modeled and theoretically evaluated in this paper and the corresponding theoretical compartment modeling of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data was analyzed. The pools considered were blood, tissue, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The blood and CSF data were mathematically modeled assuming continuous flow of the 1H spins in these pools. Tissue data was modeled using three CMs. Results in this paper show that transport across physiological brain barriers such as the blood to brain barrier, the extracellular space to the intracellular space barrier, or the blood to CSF barrier can be evaluated quantitatively. Statistical evaluations of this quantitative information may be performed to assess tissue perfusion, barriers' integrity, and CSF flow in vivo in the normal or disease-affected brain or to assess response to therapy. Copyright © 2012 Laura Fanea et al.


Goia-Socol M.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca | Goia-Socol M.,Cluj County Emergency Hospital | Duncea I.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca | Duncea I.,Cluj County Emergency Hospital | And 6 more authors.
Romanian Journal of Diabetes, Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases | Year: 2013

mineral density (BMD) changes in a group of young Romanian adults with T1DM and to analyze the factors related to this disease that could have had an impact on bone mass. Material and Methods: Fifty-two young patients with T1DM were compared to 37 healthy volunteers matched for body mass index (BMI). All subjects had their BMD measured at the hip and lumbar spine. Results: We found no statistically significant differences in BMD between T1DM patients and controls (p=0.618 for lumbar spine, p=0.974 for femoral neck and p=0.883 for total hip). Multiple linear regression models detected BMI (p =0.043), smoking (p=0.001) and milk intake (p=0.004 for lumbar spine) as significant BMD determinants. In contrast, no associations were found between BMD and metabolic control, daily insulin dose or presence of diabetic retinopathy and/or neuropathy. Long diabetes duration was negatively associated with BMD in femoral neck (p=0.012). Conclusions: Although we couldn't find differences between BMD in T1DM patients and controls, the link between diabetes duration and BMD that we found suggests that even young patients with long standing T1DM should have their BMD measured. © 2013 ILEX PUBLISHING HOUSE, Bucharest, Roumania.


Goia-Socol M.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca | Goia-Socol M.,Cluj county emergency hospital | Duncea I.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca | Duncea I.,Cluj county emergency hospital | And 8 more authors.
Annals of the Romanian Society for Cell Biology | Year: 2013

Type 1 diabetes mellitus affects bone turnover by interfering with the normal functions of bone cells. Osteoblasts seem to participate to both bone formation and resorption. Their direct bone resorptive effect was discovered recently as osteoblasts were proved to secrete cathepsin K, a lysosomal protease which represents the major cysteine cathepsin in osteoclast and is responsible for bone resorption by digesting the organic extracellular matrix of bone. Purpose: Our aim was to explore osteoblast secretion of products involved in bone formation and resorption, in particular of a bone formation enzyme, alkaline phosphatase and a bone resorption enzyme, cathepsin K and to further evaluate if the secretion of these enzymes is influenced by diabetic conditions by testing the effects of different glycemic concentrations on human primary osteoblastic cell cultures. Materials and methods: Primary human osteoblastic cell cultures were obtained using femoral head trabecular bone from patients with hip arthroplasty. Third passage subconfluent osteoblasts were exposed for 36 hours to several glucose concentrations: 2.8 mmol/l (hypoglycemia), 5.6 mmol/l (normoglycemia), 11.1 mmol/l (moderate hyperglycemia) and 28 mmol/l (extreme hyperglycemia). Cathepsin K and alkaline phosphatase activities were measured from cell supernatants. Results: Alkaline phosphatase activity values ranged between 65.67 ± 9.29 U/l in extreme hyperglycemia and 74.33 ± 13.61 in hypoglycemia group. The difference between groups was tested and a p-value of 0.806 was obtained. The lowest cathepsin K activity was observed in moderate hyperglycemia group (31.04 ± 0.73 pmol/l) and highest in hypoglycemia (35.51 ± 6.97 pmol/l). There existed no significant difference between groups regarding cathepsin K activity (p=0.671). Weak inversely proportional correlations were found between glucose and alkaline phosphatase and cathepsin K levels respectively. A significant association was observed between alkaline phosphatase and cathepsin K. Conclusions: Our study sustains the secretion of cathepsin K by osteoblasts and concludes that short time exposure (36 hours) to high-or low-glucose medium seems to have no significant impact on alkaline phosphatase and cathepsin K activities in human osteoblastic cell cultures. It is the first research that studies the effects of glucose on osteoblast-secreted cathepsin K. Further studies are warranted to complete information on the matter.


Trifa A.P.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca | Popp R.A.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca | Militaru M.S.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca | Farcas M.F.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases | Year: 2012

Background & Aims. HFE-associated haemochromatosis is one of the most frequent autosomal recessive disorders in the Caucasian population. Although most of the cases are homozygous individuals for the C282Y mutation, another two mutations, H63D and S65C, have been reported to be associated with milder forms of the disease. This study was a first attempt to evaluate the distribution of these HFE gene mutations in the Transylvania region. methods. Two-hundred and twenty-five healthy, unrelated volunteers originating from the Transylvania region, Romania, were screened for the HFE gene C282Y, H63D and S65C mutations, using molecular genetics assays (Polymerase Chain Reaction- Restriction Fragments Length Polymorphism). Results. For the C282Y mutation, 7 heterozygotes (3.1%) were found, but no homozygous individual. In the case of the H63D mutation, 40 heterozygotes (17.8%) and 4 homozygotes (1.75%) for the mutant allele were evidenced. We found a compound heterozygous genotype (C282Y/H63D) in one individual (0.45%). Thus, the allele frequencies of the C282Y and H63D were 1.75% and 10.9%, respectively. Three individuals (1.3%) were found to harbour the S65C mutation in a heterozygous state, but none in a homozygous state: the allele frequency of the mutant allele was 0.75%. Conclusions. The distribution of the HFE gene C282Y, H63D and S65C mutations found in our group matches the tendencies observed in other European countries: a decreasing gradient from Northern to Southern Europe for the C282Y mutation; high frequency for the H63D mutation, and low frequency for the S65C mutation in most of the countries.


Fanea L.,Babes - Bolyai University | Fanea L.,Cluj County Emergency Hospital | Fagan A.J.,St James's Hospital
Molecular Vision | Year: 2012

Imaging the eye with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved difficult due to the eye's propensity to move involuntarily over typical imaging timescales, obscuring the fine structure in the eye due to the resulting motion artifacts. However, advances in MRI technology help to mitigate such drawbacks, enabling the acquisition of high spatiotemporal resolution images with a variety of contrast mechanisms. This review aims to classify the MRI techniques used to date in clinical and preclinical ophthalmologic studies, describing the qualitative and quantitative information that may be extracted and how this may inform on ocular pathophysiology. © 2012 Molecular Vision.


Benga G.,Cluj County Emergency Hospital | Chapman B.E.,University of Sydney | Matei H.,Cluj County Emergency Hospital | Cox G.C.,University of Sydney | And 3 more authors.
Cell Biology International | Year: 2010

As part of a programme of comparative measurements of Pd (diffusional water permeability) the RBCs (red blood cells) from dingo (Canis familiaris dingo) and greyhound dog (Canis familiaris) were studied. The morphologies of the dingo and greyhound RBCs [examined by light and SEM (scanning electron microscopy)] were found to be very similar, with regard to aspect ratio and size; the mean diameters were estimated to be the same (~7.2 μm) for both dingo and greyhound RBCs. The water diffusional permeability was monitored by using an Mn2+-doping 1H NMR technique at 400 MHz. The Pd (cm/s) values of dingo and greyhound RBCs were similar: 6.5610-3 at 25°C, 7.5610-3 at 30°C, 10610-3 at 37°C and 11.5610-3 at 42°C. The inhibitory effect of a mercury-containing SH (sulfhydryl)-modifying reagent PCMBS (pchloromercuribenzene sulfonate) was investigated. The maximal inhibition of dingo and greyhound RBCs was reached in 15-30 min at 37°C with 2 mmol/l PCMBS. The values of maximal inhibition were in the range 72-74% when measured at 25°C and 30°C, and m~66% at 37°C. The lowest value of Pd (corresponding to the basal permeability to water) was ~2- 3610-3 cm/s in the temperature range 25-37°C. The Ea,d (activation energy of water diffusion) was 25 kJ/mol for dingo RBC and 23 kJ/mol for greyhound RBCs. After incubation with PCMBS, the values of Ea,d increased, reaching 46-48 kJ/mol in the condition of maximal inhibition of water exchange. The electrophoretograms of membrane polypeptides of the dingo and greyhound RBCs were compared and seen to be very similar. We postulate that the RBC parameters reported in the present study are characteristic of all canine species and, in particular in the two cases presented here, these parameters have not been changed by the peculiar Australian habitat over the millennia (as in the case of the dingo) or over shorter time periods, decades or centuries (as in the case of the domestic greyhound). © The Author(s) Journal compilation © 2010 Portland Press Limited.


Fanea L.,Cluj County Emergency Hospital | Nicoara S.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca | Bodea S.V.,Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology | Sfrangeu S.A.,Cluj County Emergency Hospital | Sfrangeu S.A.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca
Romanian Reports in Physics | Year: 2014

Two quantitative ocular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods for the clinical use in Ophthalmology and Radiology were developed. Ocular MRI images with spatio-temporal resoultions of 0.78/1.56/2/(5 to 84) mm/mm/mm/s were acquired from patients with diabetic retinopathy and normal subjects using a 1 T MRI system. T1 and T2 MRI relaxometry maps were generated offline from the MRI images acquired. Statistically significant differences between the T1 values of the normal and diseaseaffected groups were found. Useful qualitative and quantitative ophthalmological, radiological and surgical information covering the whole eye can be achieved using noninvazive MRI techniques. © 2014, Editura Academiei Romane. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Cluj County Emergency Hospital
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Cell biology international | Year: 2010

As part of a programme of comparative measurements of Pd (diffusional water permeability) the RBCs (red blood cells) from dingo (Canis familiaris dingo) and greyhound dog (Canis familiaris) were studied. The morphologies of the dingo and greyhound RBCs [examined by light and SEM (scanning electron microscopy)] were found to be very similar, with regard to aspect ratio and size; the mean diameters were estimated to be the same (approximately 7.2 microm) for both dingo and greyhound RBCs. The water diffusional permeability was monitored by using an Mn2+-doping 1H NMR technique at 400 MHz. The Pd (cm/s) values of dingo and greyhound RBCs were similar: 6.5 x 10(-3) at 25 degrees C, 7.5 x 10(-3) at 30 degrees C, 10 x 10(-3) at 37 degrees C and 11.5 x 10(-3) at 42 degrees C. The inhibitory effect of a mercury-containing SH (sulfhydryl)-modifying reagent PCMBS (p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonate) was investigated. The maximal inhibition of dingo and greyhound RBCs was reached in 15-30 min at 37 degrees C with 2 mmol/l PCMBS. The values of maximal inhibition were in the range 72-74% when measured at 25 degrees C and 30 degrees C, and approximately 66% at 37 degrees C. The lowest value of Pd (corresponding to the basal permeability to water) was approximately 2-3 x 10(-3) cm/s in the temperature range 25-37 degrees C. The Ea,d (activation energy of water diffusion) was 25 kJ/mol for dingo RBC and 23 kJ/mol for greyhound RBCs. After incubation with PCMBS, the values of Ea,d increased, reaching 46-48 kJ/mol in the condition of maximal inhibition of water exchange. The electrophoretograms of membrane polypeptides of the dingo and greyhound RBCs were compared and seen to be very similar. We postulate that the RBC parameters reported in the present study are characteristic of all canine species and, in particular in the two cases presented here, these parameters have not been changed by the peculiar Australian habitat over the millennia (as in the case of the dingo) or over shorter time periods, decades or centuries (as in the case of the domestic greyhound).

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