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Mounayar R.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Mounayar R.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Mounayar R.,University of Burgundy | Morzel M.,French National Center for Scientific Research | And 17 more authors.
OMICS A Journal of Integrative Biology | Year: 2014

Saliva has different functions in the mouth and is involved, for example, in taste perception. Saliva composition can also be modified rapidly by taste stimulation. It remains unclear, however, whether the perceived intensity of a tastant may modulate this response. Based on increasing evidence that fat can be perceived by the taste system and that fat taste perception may be associated with fat intake, the aim of this work was to study if stimulation by a fatty acid (oleic acid) modifies saliva composition differently in subjects highly (sensitive+) or weakly (sensitive-) sensitive to that taste. For that purpose, saliva of two groups of subjects was collected after stimulation by either a control emulsion or an emulsion containing 5.61 mM oleic acid. Saliva was analyzed by 2D electrophoresis and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The results show that sensitive+ and sensitive-subjects differ in their salivary response in terms of proteome and metabolome composition. Oppositely to sensitive-subjects, sensitive+ subjects responded to oleic acid by increased abundance of polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, rab GDP dissociation inhibitor beta, and organic acids, and decreased abundance of metabolites characteristic of mucins. The results highlight that modification of saliva composition by taste stimulation may be modulated by taste perception. Copyright © 2014 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Mounayar R.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Mounayar R.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Mounayar R.,University of Burgundy | Morzel M.,French National Center for Scientific Research | And 17 more authors.
Metabolomics | Year: 2014

Saliva is a biological fluid playing numerous roles in the oral cavity and increasingly considered as a source of markers. The role of saliva in sensory perception has been known for years but it is only recently that its potential role in oral fatty acids (FA) perception has been suggested. The aim of the present work was to study the relationships between taste sensitivity to oleic acid and the salivary proteome (2D electrophoresis) and metabolome (1H NMR). This was achieved by comparing saliva from two groups of subjects, highly (sensitive+) and weakly sensitive (sensitive-) to the taste of oleic acid. Partial least squares-discriminant analyses (PLS-DA) were used to model the relationship between sensitivity to C18:1, and the proteome and metabolome data. The two groups could be discriminated by ten spots. In particular, cystatin SN, cystatin D, zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein and carbonic anhydrase 6 were overexpressed in the sensitive+ group. The latter result was confirmed by ELISA. The overexpression of these proteins, which have been associated to taste perception, supports the argument that C18:1 is perceived by the taste system. The two groups could also be discriminated on the basis of eight metabolites, with FA, FA/proline, lysine and FA/pyruvate overexpressed in the sensitive+ group and acetate, leucine/isoleucine and butyrate overexpressed in the sensitive- group. The overexpression of these metabolites suggests a higher bacterial load in this group which could be implicated in perception of FAs. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

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