Clinical Toxicology

Guys & St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom

Clinical Toxicology

Guys & St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom

Time filter

Source Type

Global Metabolomics Market by Detection and Separation Techniques, and Applications, Growth Trends and Forecast to 2021, by iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. Metabolomics Market by Detection and Separation Techniques, and Applications (Biomarker Discovery, Clinical Toxicology, Drug Assessment, and Nutrigenomics) and Forecast 2017-2021 Maryland Heights, MO, April 15, 2017 --( Browse Metabolomics Market by Detection and Separation Techniques, and Applications (Biomarker Discovery, Clinical Toxicology, Drug Assessment, and Nutrigenomics) and Forecast 2017-2021 report at https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com/report/metabolomics-market/ The global metabolomics market report estimates the market size (Revenue USD million - 2014 to 2021) and key market segments based on detection and separation techniques used, its applications (biomarker discovery, clinical toxicology, drug assessment, and nutrigenomics), and forecasts growth trends (CAGR% - 2017 to 2021). The global metabolomics market research report is further segmented by geography into North America (U.S., Canada), Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA), Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU), Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC), and Rest of the World. The global metabolomics market report also provides the detailed market landscape, market drivers, restraints, opportunities), market attractiveness analysis and profiles of major competitors in the global market including company overview, financial snapshot, key products, technologies and services offered, and recent developments. Major players operating in the global metabolomics market and included in this report are Agilent Technologies, Inc., Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc., Shimadzu Corporation, and Waters Corporation. 1. Technique 1.1. Detection Techniques 1.2. Separation Techniques 2. Application 2.1. Biomarker Discovery 2.2. Clinical Toxicology 2.3. Drug Assessment 2.4. Nutrigenomics 3. Geography (Region, Country) 3.1. North America (U.S., Canada) 3.2. Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA) 3.3. Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU) 3.4. Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC) 3.5. Rest of the World 4. Company Profiles 4.1. Agilent Technologies Inc. 4.2. Biocrates Life Sciences AG 4.3. Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. 4.4. Bruker Corporation 4.5. Human Metabolome Technologies Inc. 4.6. LECO Corporation 4.7. Metabolon Inc. 4.8. Shimadzu Corporation 4.9. ThermoFisher Scientific Inc. 4.10. Waters Corporation To request Table of Contents and Sample Pages of this report visit: https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com/report/metabolomics-market/ About Us iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. is a global healthcare market research and consulting company providing market analysis, and competitive intelligence services to global clients. The company publishes syndicate, custom and consulting grade healthcare reports covering animal healthcare, biotechnology, clinical diagnostics, healthcare informatics, healthcare services, medical devices, medical equipment, and pharmaceuticals. In addition to multi-client studies, we offer creative consulting services and conduct proprietary single-client assignments targeted at client’s specific business objectives, information needs, time frame and budget. Please contact us to receive a proposal for a proprietary single-client study. Contact Us iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. 2109, Mckelvey Hill Drive, Maryland Heights, MO 63043 United States Email: sales@ihealthcareanalyst.com Website: https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com Maryland Heights, MO, April 15, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Metabolomics is the scientific study of chemical processes involving metabolites, whereas metabolome represents the collection of all metabolites in a biological cell, tissue, organ or organism, which are the end products of cellular processes. mRNA gene expression data and proteomic analyses reveal the set of gene products being produced in the cell, data that represents one aspect of cellular function including systems biology and functional genomics that integrates proteomic, transcriptomic, and metabolomic information to provide a better understanding of cellular biology. Metabolomics is an advanced, specialized form of analytical biochemistry that involves the study of chemical processes involving metabolites. Metabolomics enables simultaneous identification and analysis of multiple metabolites in cells, tissues and body fluids. The research funding for metabolomics has increased over the years in the major areas of research includes characterization and identification of novel biomarkers, therapeutic targets, and disease signatures in the area of cancer metabolomics.Browse Metabolomics Market by Detection and Separation Techniques, and Applications (Biomarker Discovery, Clinical Toxicology, Drug Assessment, and Nutrigenomics) and Forecast 2017-2021 report at https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com/report/metabolomics-market/The global metabolomics market report estimates the market size (Revenue USD million - 2014 to 2021) and key market segments based on detection and separation techniques used, its applications (biomarker discovery, clinical toxicology, drug assessment, and nutrigenomics), and forecasts growth trends (CAGR% - 2017 to 2021). The global metabolomics market research report is further segmented by geography into North America (U.S., Canada), Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA), Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU), Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC), and Rest of the World. The global metabolomics market report also provides the detailed market landscape, market drivers, restraints, opportunities), market attractiveness analysis and profiles of major competitors in the global market including company overview, financial snapshot, key products, technologies and services offered, and recent developments.Major players operating in the global metabolomics market and included in this report are Agilent Technologies, Inc., Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc., Shimadzu Corporation, and Waters Corporation.1. Technique1.1. Detection Techniques1.2. Separation Techniques2. Application2.1. Biomarker Discovery2.2. Clinical Toxicology2.3. Drug Assessment2.4. Nutrigenomics3. Geography (Region, Country)3.1. North America (U.S., Canada)3.2. Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA)3.3. Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU)3.4. Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC)3.5. Rest of the World4. Company Profiles4.1. Agilent Technologies Inc.4.2. Biocrates Life Sciences AG4.3. Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc.4.4. Bruker Corporation4.5. Human Metabolome Technologies Inc.4.6. LECO Corporation4.7. Metabolon Inc.4.8. Shimadzu Corporation4.9. ThermoFisher Scientific Inc.4.10. Waters CorporationTo request Table of Contents and Sample Pages of this report visit: https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com/report/metabolomics-market/About UsiHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. is a global healthcare market research and consulting company providing market analysis, and competitive intelligence services to global clients. The company publishes syndicate, custom and consulting grade healthcare reports covering animal healthcare, biotechnology, clinical diagnostics, healthcare informatics, healthcare services, medical devices, medical equipment, and pharmaceuticals.In addition to multi-client studies, we offer creative consulting services and conduct proprietary single-client assignments targeted at client’s specific business objectives, information needs, time frame and budget. Please contact us to receive a proposal for a proprietary single-client study.Contact UsiHealthcareAnalyst, Inc.2109, Mckelvey Hill Drive,Maryland Heights, MO 63043United StatesEmail: sales@ihealthcareanalyst.comWebsite: https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com


News Article | July 12, 2017
Site: www.npr.org

More People Are Making Mistakes With Medicines At Home When people take medicine at home, mistakes happen. Some people end up taking the wrong dose of a medication or the wrong pill. Sometimes, they don't wait long enough before taking a second dose. Other times, it's a health professional who's at fault. A pharmacist might have dispensed a medication at the wrong concentration, for example. These kinds of mistakes are on the rise, according to a study published Monday in the journal Clinical Toxicology. The researchers looked at a small subset of the medication errors that happen in the U.S. every year. The FDA estimates that about 1.3 million people are injured by medication errors annually in the U.S. The study analyzed data collected by poison control centers across the U.S. and counted only errors that happened outside health care facilities and resulted in serious medical outcomes. That's defined in the study as symptoms that typically require some treatment to life-threatening situations and even death. They found that the number of these cases doubled, from 3,065 cases in 2000 to 6,855 cases in 2012. In the 13 years covered by the study, more than 67,000 such errors occurred, and 414 people died as a result. Most of the mistakes were preventable, the study finds. "We know that a third of the cases in this study resulted in hospital admissions, so these aren't minor errors. These can be pretty significant," says Nichole Hodges, a research scientist at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, and the study's lead author. She says errors at home represent a significant public health burden and are likely undercounted. "Since we're only including those non-health care facility errors that are reported to poison control centers, it's an underestimate of the true number," she says. Jay Schauben, a former president of the American Association of Poison Control Centers, points out that not everyone calls a poison control center when they experience one of these events. And he says there could be "minor inaccuracies" in the data from poison control, because the employees who answer calls are relying on what the caller tells them, and if a physician calls about a patient, that physician might not know exactly what happened to the patient. Despite these limitations, he says the study's findings are still valid and useful. And he says he's glad to see this study draw attention to medication errors happening at home. "We focus on medication errors in health care facilities, and we tend to forget that these types of errors do occur in the home scenario and potentially go uncorrected, maybe unrecognized," Schauben says. Cardiovascular drugs, including drugs used to treat high blood pressure, were associated with about one in five serious medication errors — more than any other pharmaceutical category. The number of errors with cardiovascular drugs doubled over the time period of the study, and errors linked to hormones and hormone antagonists – mainly drugs used to treat diabetes – more than tripled. Hodges says they can't be sure about the reasons for these increases, but they have a theory. "We know that use of cardiovascular medications is increasing. That's consistent with the findings of other studies," she says. "The same with the use of insulin. Because we have rising rates of diabetes in the U.S., prescribing of insulin is increasing. So we think that some of these increases in errors are a reflection of the increase in prescribing." Cardiovascular medications and analgesics – essentially painkillers, including acetaminophen and opioids — were responsible for two-thirds of the deaths included in the study. So what should people do to keep themselves safe from medication errors at home? Hodges has a few recommendations. People who use weekly pillboxes to organize medicines should make sure they have some kind of lock and keep them out of sight of children, she says. "The locks are great, but they're just child-resistant. They're not going to be child-proof," she says. "It basically buys you a little bit more time, but it's not going to keep the child out of it completely, so you still want to use safe storage." And keeping a close eye on kids who are taking medication can also help them avoid taking the wrong pills, she says. The study found that kids in the 6- to 12-year-old group were the most likely to unintentionally take or be given another person's medication. "Perhaps they are giving themselves their medication, especially if it's a daily," Hodges says. "They might be more likely to accidentally take someone else's medication." She also recommends that parents and caregivers keep a written log to track the date and time when medications are given and the dose given – especially when more than one person is giving medicine to the same person. Schauben recommends that people call a poison control center if they have questions about medicines they're taking at home. "It doesn't have to be an exposure," he says. "Those are questions that we could answer for them."


News Article | July 19, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

On July 12, The American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) and the American Academy of Clinical Toxicology (AACT) released a detailed statement on safety precautions for emergency responders in case of fentanyl exposure. Fentanyl is an ultra-potent opioid that police, firefighters and paramedics may encounter when responding to medical calls, crime scenes, or drug raids. Despite concerning stories of emergency responders developing symptoms after exposure of skin to fentanyl residue or powder, the reported symptoms have not been consistent with poisoning by opioids. In addition, these drugs are not absorbed well enough through the skin to cause sickness from incidental contact. ACMT contends that emergency responders should exercise reasonable caution around unknown drugs. However, excessive personal protective equipment (which has been recommended by some safety organizations) may be harmful because bulky, unnecessary equipment could potentially interfere with vital tasks that emergency responders perform. The ACMT fentanyl statement recommends that for “routine handling of these drugs, nitrile gloves provide simple protection” and that masks and face shields are only needed in very exceptional circumstances. According to the statement, “Toxicity cannot occur from simply being in proximity of the drug.” In the event drug powder gets on skin, ACMT recommends simply washing it off. ACMT hopes that this guidance will reassure emergency responders. “Police and emergency medical technicians have challenging jobs,” said Andrew Stolbach, MD, a physician at Johns Hopkins, board member of ACMT and lead author of the statement. “We want these professionals to know that simple commonsense practices, such as wearing gloves, are more than sufficient to protect them. It’s just not plausible that getting a small amount of fentanyl on your skin is going to cause significant opioid toxicity.” The American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) is a professional, nonprofit association of more than 700 physicians with recognized expertise in medical toxicology. Medical toxicology focuses on the diagnosis, management, and prevention of poisoning/toxicity and other adverse health effects resulting from medications, chemicals, occupational and environmental substances and biological hazards. Current projects at ACMT include research and treatment of synthetic cannabinoid abuse, opioid addiction, lead and mold exposure, Zika virus, venomous bites/stings and gas poisoning.


News Article | July 26, 2017
Site: www.reuters.com

(Reuters Health) - The percentage of Americans sickened as a result of medication errors outside of healthcare facilities doubled between 2000 and 2012, according to research highlighting the need for better labeling and dose management. Medication mistakes outside of hospitals and other healthcare facilities - mostly at home - led to the deaths of 414 people during the 13 years studied, the study found. More than one-third of the fatal mistakes were related to prescription and over-the-counter painkillers, according to the report in the Journal of Clinical Toxicology. Another 30 percent resulted from cardiovascular drugs, primarily beta-blockers such as metoprolol and atenolol, for example. The errors involved a wide variety of drugs and people of all ages. Most could have been prevented, said lead author Nichole Hodges, a research scientist at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. “These errors are a significant public health burden with one-third of the cases resulting in hospital admission,” she said in a phone interview. Most of the errors resulted from patients taking - or caregivers giving - a double dose, patients forgetting that they took the first pill and taking a second, or taking a pill from the wrong bottle, Hodges said. "Drug manufacturers and pharmacists have a role to play when it comes to reducing medication errors," said co-author Henry Spiller, director of the Central Ohio Poison Center at Nationwide Children's. "There is room for improvement in product packaging and labeling. Dosing instructions could be made clearer, especially for patients and caregivers with limited literacy or numeracy,” he said in a statement. Researchers analyzed calls to poison control centers across the nation that resulted in the need for medical treatment. On average, poison control centers get calls about more than 5,200 medication errors a year resulting in serious medical outcomes outside of healthcare facilities. The number of calls about drug mistakes rose 100 percent, from 1.09 per 100,000 people in 2000 to 2.28 per 100,000 in 2012. But that doesn’t reflect the true number of out-of-hospital medication errors, Hodges said, because her team counted only mistakes called into poison control centers. Jody Green, director of research administration at the Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center in Denver, said many mistakes could be avoided if consumers read drug labels, and if the labels were easier to read. “Patients don’t often read the label, even when safety information is present,” she said in a phone interview. “The package inserts that come with prescriptions are often very lengthy. A lot of the time the font is so small that people, especially elderly, can’t read it.” One in five of the medication errors in the study involved cardiovascular drugs. Cardiovascular drugs accounted for nearly twice as many mistakes as any other category of drugs, and the number of errors increased over the study period by 177 percent. Hodges attributed the increase in cardiovascular drug mistakes at least in part to an increase in the number of people prescribed beta-blockers and other drugs to control heart disease and blood pressure. Green, who was not involved with the study, believes a number of private and public initiatives likely have slowed the rate of drug errors since the study ended. She is a member of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s PROTECT Initiative, a task force to advance children’s medication safety. PROTECT has worked with industry to unify units of measurement on drug containers and instructions, for example, so parents no longer have to try to convert directions given in ounces to drug cups measured in milliliters, or vice-versa, she said. Nonetheless, more remains to be done, especially to consistently label prescription drugs so consumers know what they’re taking and which other drugs to avoid, she said. “We need to get away from lengthy pamphlets and think about something that’s more translatable to the general public,” she said. Hodges advises parents and caregivers to keep a record each time they give a dose of a drug to a child. “We really recommend that people write it down,” she said. “We recommend keeping a notebook right there with the medication.” Everyone needs a system to ensure they are taking the right dose of the right medicine at the right time, Hodges said, and added: “Counseling on prescriptions is really important, both by physicians and by pharmacists.”


News Article | July 10, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Researchers advise parents to keep medication logs and store all medications up, away, and out of sight Every 21 seconds someone in the United States calls Poison Control because of a medication error. A new study from the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Central Ohio Poison Center at Nationwide Children's Hospital analyzed calls to Poison Control Centers across the country over a 13-year period about exposures to medication errors which resulted in serious medical outcomes. These exposures, which occurred outside of health care facilities, primarily in the home, affected individuals of all ages and were associated with a wide variety of medications. The study, published by Clinical Toxicology, found a 100 percent increase in the rate of serious medication errors per 100,000 U.S. residents (from 1.09 in 2000 to 2.28 in 2012). Medication error frequency and rates increased for all age groups except children younger than six years of age. Among children younger than six years, the rate of medication errors increased early in the study and then decreased after 2005, which was primarily associated with a decrease in the use of cough and cold medicines. According to the study authors, this decrease is likely attributable to the Food and Drug Administration's 2007 recommendation against administering these products to young children. The medication categories most frequently associated with serious outcomes were cardiovascular drugs (21%), analgesics (i.e., painkillers) (12%), and hormones/hormone antagonists (11%). Most analgesic exposures were related to products containing acetaminophen (44%) or opioids (34%), and nearly two-thirds of hormone/hormone antagonist exposures were associated with insulin. Cardiovascular and analgesic medications combined accounted for more than two-thirds (66%) of all fatalities in this study. "Drug manufacturers and pharmacists have a role to play when it comes to reducing medication errors," said Henry Spiller, MS, D.ABAT, a co-author of the study, and director of the Central Ohio Poison Center at Nationwide Children's. "There is room for improvement in product packaging and labeling. Dosing instructions could be made clearer, especially for patients and caregivers with limited literacy or numeracy." Overall, the most common types of medication errors were taking or giving the wrong medication or incorrect dosage, and inadvertently taking or giving the medication twice. Among children, dosing errors and inadvertently taking or giving somoneone else's medication were also common errors. One-third of medication errors resulted in hospital admission. "Managing medications is an important skill for everyone, but parents and caregivers have the additional responsibility of managing others' medications," said Nichole Hodges, PhD, lead author of the study and research scientist in the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's. "When a child needs medication, one of the best things to do is keep a written log of the day and time each medication is given to ensure the child stays on schedule and does not get extra doses." Everyone can follow a few guidelines to help prevent medication errors in their homes: Data for this study were obtained from the National Poison Data System, which is maintained by the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC). The AAPCC receives data on calls to participating poison control centers that serve the US and its territories. Poison control centers receive phone calls through the Poison Help Line and document information about the product, route of exposure, individual exposed, exposure scenario, and other data. The Central Ohio Poison Center provides state-of-the-art poison prevention, assessment and treatment to residents in 64 of Ohio's 88 counties. The center services are available to the public, medical professionals, industry, and human service agencies. The Poison Center handles more than 42,000 poison exposure calls annually, and confidential, free emergency poisoning treatment advice is available 24/7. To learn more about the Poison Center, visit http://www. . The Center for Injury Research and Policy (CIRP) of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital works globally to reduce injury-related pediatric death and disabilities. With innovative research at its core, CIRP works to continually improve the scientific understanding of the epidemiology, biomechanics, prevention, acute treatment, and rehabilitation of injuries. CIRP serves as a pioneer by translating cutting edge injury research into education, policy, and advances in clinical care. For related injury prevention materials or to learn more about CIRP, visit http://www. .


FORT LAUDERDALE-DAVIE, FL--(Marketwired - October 24, 2016) - In recognition of his significant contributions to Nova Southeastern University (NSU), Robert C. Speth, Ph.D., was named the recipient of the Sixth Annual Provost's Research and Scholarship Award. Dr. Speth is a researcher and professor of pharmaceutical sciences in NSU's College of Pharmacy. Ralph V. Rogers Jr., Ph.D., NSU executive vice president and provost, made the special announcement at the university's External Funding Recognition Reception, hosted by Gary S. Margules, Sc.D., NSU vice president of Research and Technology Transfer, at which faculty members from all disciplines across the university are recognized for their commitment to advancing their fields of study. The Provost's Award honors a faculty member who has demonstrated significant achievement in support of NSU's mission to foster scholarship, intellectual inquiry, and academic excellence. Research and scholarship are two of NSU's eight core values, and excellence in these areas enhances education, patient care, and public service, and develops superior scholarship. "Dr. Speth has distinguished himself as a researcher, an educator, and a staunch supporter of the NSU community," said Dr. Rogers. "He has truly demonstrated what this award is meant to recognize: innovative and sustained activities in support of NSU's mission to foster intellectual inquiry, academic excellence, research and a dynamic learning environment." "This is the greatest honor that has ever been bestowed upon me," said Dr. Speth. "What makes it even greater is the fact that there are so many other incredibly talented faculty members in the NSU family who are also deserving of this recognition. I dedicate this award to my mentor Hank Yamamura who taught me to always make the best interests of my students my highest priority, and it is those very same students who paved the way for me to receive this honor." Dr. Speth is widely recognized for his research on how angiotensin acts in the brain to regulate the cardiovascular system. In the course of his career, he has secured more than $1 million in funding for his research through 22 externally-funded projects. Dr. Speth is a regular contributor to a variety of national publications and has served or is currently serving on the editorial boards of prestigious journals, including Regulatory Peptides, the Journal of Pharmacology & Clinical Toxicology and the International Journal of Peptides. He has served as an ad-hoc reviewer for 39 journals, including Science. He has also served the field as a grant reviewer for organizations including the American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation. Dr. Speth manages to be a leader in the research field while also offering countless hours to teaching endeavors. In addition to his classroom commitments, he has mentored countless high-school, undergraduate and graduate students, along with junior faculty members, working with him in his lab on various projects. Dr. Speth and his wife, Janet, are Bronze members of NSU's Fellows Society which recognizes individuals, corporations, and trusts who have made cumulative gifts of $100,000-$249,999. This demonstrates Dr. Speth's investment in the advancement of NSU through the largest philanthropic campaign in its history, Realizing Potential, which aims to raise $250 million for student, faculty and 21st century education initiatives, with research integral to all three priorities. Dr. Speth has received multiple honors, including election as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He earned his Ph.D. in Pharmacology from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, his Master of Arts degree in Physiological Psychology from Connecticut College in New London, and his Bachelor of Arts degree in Biology and Psychology from Western Maryland College in Westminster (now McDaniel College). *Denotes titles and college names at the time the award was presented. About Nova Southeastern University (NSU): Located in beautiful Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Nova Southeastern University (NSU) is a dynamic research institution dedicated to providing high-quality educational programs at the undergraduate, graduate, and first-professional degree levels. A private, not-for-profit institution, NSU has campuses in Fort Lauderdale, Fort Myers, Jacksonville, Miami, Miramar, Orlando, Palm Beach, and Tampa, Florida, as well as San Juan, Puerto Rico, while maintaining a presence online globally. For more than 50 years, NSU has been awarding degrees in a wide range of fields, while fostering groundbreaking research and an impactful commitment to community. Classified as a research university with "high research activity" by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, NSU is 1 of only 50 universities nationwide to also be awarded Carnegie's Community Engagement Classification, and is also the largest private, not-for-profit institution in the United States that meets the U.S. Department of Education's criteria as a Hispanic-serving Institution. Please visit www.nova.edu for more information about NSU and realizingpotential.nova.edu for more information on the largest fundraising campaign in NSU history.


Receive press releases from iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc.: By Email Metabolomics Market USD 1.24 Billion by 2020, Published by iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. Maryland Heights, MO, November 03, 2016 --( Visit the Metabolomics Market 2013-2020 report at https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com/report/metabolomics-market/ Metabolomics is the scientific study of chemical processes involving metabolites, whereas metabolome represents the collection of all metabolites in a biological cell, tissue, organ or organism, which are the end products of cellular processes. mRNA gene expression data and proteomic analyses reveal the set of gene products being produced in the cell, data that represents one aspect of cellular function including systems biology and functional genomics that integrates proteomic, transcriptomic, and metabolomic information to provide a better understanding of cellular biology. The metabolomics market report estimates the market size (Revenue USD million - 2013 to 2020) and key market segments based on detection and separation techniques used, its applications (biomarker discovery, clinical toxicology, drug assessment, and nutrigenomics), and forecasts growth trends (CAGR% - 2016 to 2020). It also provides the detailed market landscape and profiles of major competitors in the global metabolomics market including company overview, financial snapshot, key products, technologies and services offered, and recent trends in strategic management. The global metabolomics market research report is divided by geography (regional and country based) into North America (U.S., Canada), Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA), Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU), Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC), and Rest of the World. 1. Technique 1.1. Detection Techniques 1.2. Separation Techniques 2. Application 2.1. Biomarker Discovery 2.2. Clinical Toxicology 2.3. Drug Assessment 2.4. Nutrigenomics 3. Company Profiles 3.1. Agilent Technologies Inc. 3.2. Biocrates Life Sciences AG 3.3. Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. 3.4. Bruker Corporation 3.5. Human Metabolome Technologies Inc. 3.6. LECO Corporation 3.7. Metabolon Inc. 3.8. Shimadzu Corporation 3.9. ThermoFisher Scientific Inc. 3.10. Waters Corporation About Us iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. is a global health care market research and consulting company providing market analysis, and competitive intelligence services to global clients. The Company publishes syndicate, custom and consulting grade healthcare reports covering animal healthcare, biotechnology, clinical diagnostics, healthcare informatics, healthcare services, medical devices, medical equipment, and pharmaceuticals. iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. provides industry participants and stakeholders with strategically analyzed, unbiased view of market dynamics and business opportunities within its coverage areas. Contact Us iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. 2109, Mckelvey Hill Drive, Maryland Heights, MO 63043 United States Email: sales@ihealthcareranalyst.com Website: https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com Maryland Heights, MO, November 03, 2016 --( PR.com )-- The global metabolomics market is estimated to reach USD 1.24 Billion in 2020, growing at a CAGR of 15.6% from 2016 to 2020, according to a market research report Metabolomics Market 2013-2020, published by iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc.Visit the Metabolomics Market 2013-2020 report at https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com/report/metabolomics-market/Metabolomics is the scientific study of chemical processes involving metabolites, whereas metabolome represents the collection of all metabolites in a biological cell, tissue, organ or organism, which are the end products of cellular processes. mRNA gene expression data and proteomic analyses reveal the set of gene products being produced in the cell, data that represents one aspect of cellular function including systems biology and functional genomics that integrates proteomic, transcriptomic, and metabolomic information to provide a better understanding of cellular biology.The metabolomics market report estimates the market size (Revenue USD million - 2013 to 2020) and key market segments based on detection and separation techniques used, its applications (biomarker discovery, clinical toxicology, drug assessment, and nutrigenomics), and forecasts growth trends (CAGR% - 2016 to 2020). It also provides the detailed market landscape and profiles of major competitors in the global metabolomics market including company overview, financial snapshot, key products, technologies and services offered, and recent trends in strategic management.The global metabolomics market research report is divided by geography (regional and country based) into North America (U.S., Canada), Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA), Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU), Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC), and Rest of the World.1. Technique1.1. Detection Techniques1.2. Separation Techniques2. Application2.1. Biomarker Discovery2.2. Clinical Toxicology2.3. Drug Assessment2.4. Nutrigenomics3. Company Profiles3.1. Agilent Technologies Inc.3.2. Biocrates Life Sciences AG3.3. Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc.3.4. Bruker Corporation3.5. Human Metabolome Technologies Inc.3.6. LECO Corporation3.7. Metabolon Inc.3.8. Shimadzu Corporation3.9. ThermoFisher Scientific Inc.3.10. Waters CorporationAbout UsiHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. is a global health care market research and consulting company providing market analysis, and competitive intelligence services to global clients. The Company publishes syndicate, custom and consulting grade healthcare reports covering animal healthcare, biotechnology, clinical diagnostics, healthcare informatics, healthcare services, medical devices, medical equipment, and pharmaceuticals.iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. provides industry participants and stakeholders with strategically analyzed, unbiased view of market dynamics and business opportunities within its coverage areas.Contact UsiHealthcareAnalyst, Inc.2109, Mckelvey Hill Drive,Maryland Heights, MO 63043United StatesEmail: sales@ihealthcareranalyst.comWebsite: https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc.


News Article | March 30, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

Researchers have taken major steps in drug analysis. While medication is often prescribed as a way to relieve the stresses and traumas following combat, more than 20 percent of military people with post-traumatic stress disorder have developed a drug or alcohol addiction. Although there are treatments for substance dependence, including medication to reduce its use (Buprenorphine), tests performed by Veterans Affairs hospital physicians that check for recurring drug use usually involve collecting urine samples and sending to a lab for analysis, which could take up to two weeks. But now you don’t have to wait that long. In fact, you could get test results while the individual is still in the VA hospital so that treatment can be quickly adjusted. Real-Time Analyzers Inc. has been developing a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)-based assay that can detect and identify numerous drugs in saliva at ng/mL concentrations within 10 minutes. The sample collection from subjects began in August 2015 and is ongoing. While the first field-usable Raman spectrometer was developed more than a decade ago, today the company uses a hand-held version to measure the drugs in saliva. The Connecticut-based company that designs and manufactures Raman analyzers for use in field, plant and laboratory settings partnered with CT Veterans Affairs Hospital, so all of its subjects were in fact military personnel. “The goal is to try and help our veterans reduce their addiction to the drugs that they started taking when they were in the field,” Stuart Farquharson, Ph.D., Board of Directors member & president at Real-Time Analyzers told R&D Magazine after his session at Pittcon in Atlanta earlier this month, titled Clinical Toxicology: Analysis of Drugs in Saliva During Treatment of PTSD Patients. “To do that, we need to monitor that they’re taking the drugs that are trying to help them and that’s been the biggest issue, we need a point-of-care measurement so you know what the situation is when the doctor is talking to them each time they visit.” Co-authors of this study also included Katie Dana, Chetan Shende and Dr. Albert Arias. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 23.9 million Americans currently use illicit drugs, and 6.8 million Americans misuse prescription drugs. The most common drugs prescribed to PTSD patients are Benzodiazepines and an addictive anxiety medication called Diazepam. As a result, the SERS analyzer was developed to provide the following: Real-Time Analyzers used the portable drug analyzer by collecting 1 mL of saliva, added a sample of reagent tube, passed the sample through a filter into Lab-on-chip, then inserted the LOC into the portable Raman analyzer. The device extracted drugs using SLE. The team measured 150 drugs, looking for the standard ones of abuse, such as cocaine and prescription drugs. The researchers also developed a spectral search and match software to ID the drugs found in the subject’s saliva. “In the end we were able to get a measurement that was pretty consistent,” Farquharson said during the session. The research team’s findings were “shocking,” according to Farquharson—of the more than 100 samples measured, very few of them had any drugs at all in their system, save for “street drugs.” “That’s another part of the scenario—they (veterans) are selling the medication they’re using to get other drugs, which is really unfortunate,” he added. While the research team achieved the required 10-50 nanograms/mL sensitivity for many of the drugs in water samples, they still need to improve the extraction method to obtain the same sensitivity in saliva samples. “Our goal is to have an analyzer and method that can identify and quantify drugs in saliva within 10 minutes of sample collection. This would provide doctors with the ability to evaluate PTSD patients during office visits. The analyzer would also allow rapid identification of drug type in emergency-room overdose patients,” Farquharson concluded. Establish your company as a technology leader! For more than 50 years, the R&D 100 Awards have showcased new products of technological significance. You can join this exclusive community! Learn more.


News Article | August 22, 2016
Site: www.sciencenews.org

For some people, fentanyl can be a life-saver, easing profound pain. But outside of a doctor’s office, the powerful opioid drug is also a covert killer. In the last several years, clandestine drugmakers have begun experimenting with this ingredient, baking it into drugs sold on the streets, most notably heroin. Fentanyl and closely related compounds have “literally invaded the entire heroin supply,” says medical toxicologist Lewis Nelson of New York University Langone Medical Center. Fentanyl is showing up in other drugs, too. In San Francisco’s Bay Area in March, high doses of fentanyl were laced into counterfeit versions of the pain pill Norco. In January, fentanyl was found in illegal pills sold as oxycodone in New Jersey. And in late 2015, fentanyl turned up in fake Xanax pills in California. This ubiquitous recipe-tinkering makes it impossible for users to know whether they’re about to take drugs mixed with fentanyl. And that uncertainty has proved deadly. Fentanyl-related deaths are rising sharply in multiple areas. National numbers are hard to come by, but in many regions around the United States, fentanyl-related fatalities have soared in recent years. Maryland is one of the hardest-hit states. From 2007 to 2012, the number of fentanyl-related deaths hovered around 30 per year. By 2015, that number had grown to 340. A similar rise is obvious in Connecticut, where in 2012, there were 14 fentanyl-related deaths. In 2015, that number was 188. In Massachusetts, two-thirds of people who died from opioid overdoses in the first half of 2016 showed signs of fentanyl. This wave of fentanyl-related overdoses is “horrendous,” says Daniel Ciccarone of the University of California, San Francisco. What’s worse, he says, “I think it’s here to stay.” Fentanyl is not a new drug. Available in the 1960s, it is still used in hospitals as an anesthetic and is available by prescription to fight powerful pain. What’s new, Ciccarone says, is that clandestine drug manufacturers have discovered that the euphoria-producing opioid can be made cheaply and easily — no poppy fields necessary. Fentanyl is about 30 to 40 times stronger than heroin and up to 100 times more powerful than morphine, which means that a given effect on the body can be achieved with a much smaller amount of fentanyl. Inadvertently taking a bit of fentanyl can cause big trouble. “It’s a dosing problem,” Nelson says. “Because the drug is so potent, little changes in measurements can have very big implications for toxicity. That’s really the problem.” That problem is made worse by the variability of illegal drugs — users often don’t know what they’re buying. Illegal labs aren’t pumping out products with carefully calibrated doses or uniform chemical makeup. The drugs change from day to day, making it nearly impossible for a user to know what he or she is about to take, Ciccarone says. He has seen this struggle up close. Drug users have told him that the products they buy are unpredictable. Another thing people are telling him: “That they and their friends and compatriots are dropping like flies.” Tellingly, some of the most experienced drug users have recently begun doing “tester shots,” small doses to get a sense of the type and dose of drug they’re about to use, Ciccarone says. Users are right to be wary. Typically, opioids can kill by gradually depressing a person’s ability to breathe. Illicit fentanyl, a recent study suggests, can kill within minutes by paralyzing muscles. Doctors have known that when injected quickly, fentanyl can paralyze chest wall muscles, prevent breathing and kill a person rapidly. That effect, called “wooden chest,” might help explain the rise in fentanyl-related deaths, scientists report in the June Clinical Toxicology. A quick injection of fentanyl “literally freezes the muscles and you can’t move the chest,” says toxicologist Henry Spiller of the Central Ohio Poison Center in Columbus. That’s why doctors who dispense fentanyl in the hospital intentionally proceed very slowly and keep the opioid-counteracting drug naloxone (Narcan) on hand. “If you give it too fast, we know this occurs,” Spiller says. But it wasn’t known whether this same phenomenon might help explain the death rate of people using the drug illegally. Spiller and colleagues tested post-mortem concentrations of fentanyl and its breakdown product norfentanyl in 48 fentanyl-related deaths. The body usually begins breaking down fentanyl into norfentanyl within two minutes, an earlier study found. Yet in 20 of the cases, the researchers found no signs of norfentanyl, indicating death came almost immediately after first receiving fentanyl. Naloxone can counteract the effects of opioids if someone nearby can administer the antidote. But for people whose chests quickly freeze from fentanyl, resuscitation becomes more unlikely. Fentanyl “is just a bad drug,” Spiller says. Fentanyl’s danger is magnified for people not accustomed to taking opioids, such as those addicted to cocaine, a situation illustrated by a recent tragedy in New Haven, Conn. New Haven authorities noticed a string of suspicious overdoses in late June, leaving three people dead. Drug users thought they were buying cocaine, but the drugs contained fentanyl, says analytical toxicologist Kara Lynch of the University of California, San Francisco. As one of the handful of labs capable of testing blood and urine for fentanyl, hers was called on to identify the culprit. Her lab spotted fentanyl in Norco tablets back in March. Lynch’s group uses high-resolution mass spectrometry to detect many drugs’ chemical signatures. But this method reveals only the drugs scientists suspect. “We can look for what we know to look for,” she says. And success depends on getting the samples in the first place. The logistical hurdles of figuring out exactly what a person took, and how much, and when, are large. Ciccarone contrasts the situation with cases of food poisoning. When people start getting sick, public health officials can figure out what lettuce people ate and test it for pathogens. The same kind of tracking system doesn’t exist for drugs. His efforts to develop a system for testing illegal drugs in Baltimore broke down in part because no one had time to do the work. “The coroner is so busy right now with dead bodies,” he says. “They don’t have the time to test the ‘lettuce.’ ” In the quest to curb fentanyl-related deaths, scientists and public health officials are searching for new strategies. Spiller advocates a more targeted public health message to users, one that emphasizes that fentanyl is simply a deadly drug, not just a more potent high. Ciccarone says that facilities where drug users can take illegal drugs under the care of medical personnel might reduce the number of fatalities. For now, the scope of the problem continues to grow, Nelson says. The situation is made worse by the ingenuity of illicit drugmakers, who readily experiment with new compounds. Fentanyl itself can be tweaked to create at least 16 related forms, one of which, acetyl fentanyl, has been linked to overdose deaths. New drugs and new tweaks to old drugs rapidly evolve (SN: 5/16/15, p. 22), Nelson says, creating a game of whack-a-mole in which designer drugs confound public health officials and law enforcement. “There is no single easy solution to this problem,” he says.


The diabetes monitoring, treatment and drug delivery market in the U.S. is expected to increase to over $25 billion by 2023 VANCOUVER, BC--(Marketwired - November 02, 2016) - According to a new series of reports on the U.S. market for diabetes monitoring, treatment and drug delivery by iData Research (www.idataresearch.com), growth in the U.S. diabetes market is expected to persist over the next several years. Growth will be driven by the increasing prevalence of diabetes in the U.S. and technological advancements made in certain segments, particularly insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). However, lower reimbursement rates exhibit a significantly limiting effect on the market, as downward pressure is applied to pricing in the overall blood glucose monitoring market. "The recent influx of low-price competitors in the blood glucose test strip segment has placed downward pressure on prices," explains Dr. Kamran Zamanian, CEO of iData. "As a result, overall market value has decreased despite the increasing number of diabetics testing their blood glucose levels in the United States." In addition, patent expirations of flagship insulin products have resulted in the emergence of biosimilars or generic insulins, as well as next-generation insulins. Biosimilars are competitively priced to their insulin counterparts and put downward pressure on the overall price of insulin. Next-generation insulins are typically premium priced due to their increased average active durations, decreasing the amount of injections patients must perform on a daily basis. The Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Toxicology Devices panel of the FDA recently voted in favor of a non-adjunctive label that would allow DexCom G5® Mobile users to make insulin dosing decisions based on CGM data, as opposed to traditional blood glucose meter readings. Although some CGM users have already been making insulin dosing decisions based on their CGM data, attaching such a claim to the product would reinforce confidence in CGM accuracy and have significant implications for the future of the market. A non-adjunctive claim may increase the likelihood of Medicare patients, who represent nearly 40% of the total diagnosed diabetic population, receiving reimbursement for CGM products in the future. As a result, CGM penetration would be positively influenced by the increased accessibility and number of physicians who are more likely to prescribe CGM as a therapy option. Sanofi has the largest share of the diabetes monitoring, treatment and drug delivery market, due to their strong position in the insulin, prefilled pen and pen cartridge markets. Sanofi dominates the long-acting insulin segment with its flagship product, Lantus®, which has been available on the U.S. market since 2001. The patent for Lantus® expired in 2015 and is expected to face competition from a biosimilar product by Eli Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim. In response, Sanofi is currently developing a biosimilar to Eli Lilly's popular rapid-acting insulin analog Humalog®. Sanofi and Novo Nordisk recently launched next-generation insulin products: insulin glargine U-300 (Toujeo®) and insulin degludec (Tresiba®), respectively. The insulin-dependent patient population is expected to transition to next-generation insulin products and will contribute to the growth of the insulin market and associated insulin delivery markets. More on the diabetes device market in the U.S. can be found in a series of reports published by iData Research entitled the US Market Report Suite for Diabetes Monitoring, Treatment and Drug Delivery. The suite covers reports on the following markets: blood glucose meters, blood glucose test strips, lancets and lancing devices, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), insulin, inulin pens, insulin syringes and insulin pumps. The iData report series on diabetes devices covers the U.S. and 15 countries in Europe including Germany, France, the United Kingdom (U.K.), Italy, Spain, Benelux (Belgium, Netherlands and Luxemburg), Scandinavia (Finland, Denmark, Sweden and Norway), Portugal, Austria and Switzerland. Reports provide a comprehensive analysis including units sold, procedure numbers, market value, forecasts, as well as detailed competitive market shares and analysis of major players' success strategies in each market and segment. To find out more about diabetes device market data or procedure data, register online or email us at info@idataresearch.net for a US Market Report Suite for Diabetes Monitoring, Treatment and Drug Delivery brochure and synopsis. iData Research (www.idataresearch.com) is an international market research and consulting group focused on providing market intelligence for medical device and pharmaceutical companies. iData covers research in: Operating Room Equipment, Surgical Microscopes, Robotics and Surgical Navigation, Laparoscopy, Urology, Gynecology, Vascular Access, Endoscopy, Interventional Cardiology, Cardiac Surgery, Cardiac Rhythm Management, Electrophysiology, Ultrasound, X-Ray Imaging, Diagnostic Imaging, Oncology, Spinal Implants and VCF, Spinal MIS, Orthopedic Soft Tissue Repair and Regeneration, Orthopedic Trauma, Large & Small Joints, Anesthesiology, Wound Management, Orthopedics, Ophthalmics, Dental Operatory Equipment and more.

Loading Clinical Toxicology collaborators
Loading Clinical Toxicology collaborators