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Maltha J.,Institute of Tropical Medicine | Maltha J.,Catholic University of Leuven | Guiraud I.,IRSS Clinical Research Unit of Nanoro CRUN | Lompo P.,IRSS Clinical Research Unit of Nanoro CRUN | And 5 more authors.
Malaria Journal | Year: 2014

Background: In most sub-Saharan African countries malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are now used for the diagnosis of malaria. Most RDTs used detect Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein-2 (PfHRP2), though P. falciparum-specific parasite lactate dehydrogenase (Pf-pLDH)-detecting RDTs may have advantages over PfHRP2-detecting RDTs. Only few data are available on the use of RDTs in severe illness and the present study compared Pf-pLDH to PfHRP2-detection. Methods. Hospitalized children aged one month to 14 years presenting with fever or severe illness were included over one year. Venous blood samples were drawn for malaria diagnosis (microscopy and RDT), culture and complete blood count. Leftovers were stored at -80 °C and used for additional RDT analysis and PCR. An RDT targeting both PfHRP2 and Pf-pLDH was performed on all samples for direct comparison of diagnostic accuracy with microscopy as reference method. PCR was performed to explore false-positive RDT results. Results: In 376 of 694 (54.2%) included children, malaria was microscopically confirmed. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value were 100.0, 70.9, 69.4 and 100.0%, respectively for PfHRP2-detection and 98.7, 94.0, 91.6 and 99.1%, respectively for Pf-pLDH-detection. Specificity and PPV were significantly lower for PfHRP2-detection (p <0.001). For both detection antigens, specificity was lowest for children one to five years and in the rainy season. PPV for both antigens was highest in the rainy season, because of higher malaria prevalence. False positive PfHRP2 results were associated with prior anti-malarial treatment and positive PCR results (98/114 (86.0%) samples tested). Conclusion: Among children presenting with severe febrile illness in a seasonal hyperendemic malaria transmission area, the present study observed similar sensitivity but lower specificity and PPV of PfHRP2 compared to Pf-pLDH-detection. Further studies should assess the diagnostic accuracy and safety of an appropriate Pf-pLDH-detecting RDT in field settings and if satisfying, replacement of PfHRP2 by Pf-pLDH-detecting RDTs should be considered. © 2014 Maltha et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Maltha J.,Institute of Tropical Medicine | Maltha J.,Catholic University of Leuven | Guiraud I.,IRSS Clinical Research Unit of Nanoro CRUN | Kabore B.,IRSS Clinical Research Unit of Nanoro CRUN | And 6 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

Background: Although severe malaria is an important cause of mortality among children in Burkina Faso, data on community-acquired invasive bacterial infections (IBI, bacteremia and meningitis) are lacking, as well as data on the involved pathogens and their antibiotic resistance rates. Methods: The present study was conducted in a rural hospital and health center in Burkina Faso, in a seasonal malaria transmission area. Hospitalized children (<15 years) presenting with T≥38.0°C and/or signs of severe illness were enrolled upon admission. Malaria diagnosis and blood culture were performed for all participants, lumbar puncture when clinically indicated. We assessed the frequency of severe malaria (microscopically confirmed, according to World Health Organization definitions) and IBI, and the species distribution and antibiotic resistance of the bacterial pathogens causing IBI. Results: From July 2012 to July 2013, a total of 711 patients were included. Severe malaria was diagnosed in 292 (41.1%) children, including 8 (2.7%) with IBI co-infection. IBI was demonstrated in 67 (9.7%) children (bacteremia, n = 63; meningitis, n = 6), 8 (11.8%) were co-infected with malaria. Non-Typhoid Salmonella spp. (NTS) was the predominant isolate from blood culture (32.8%), followed by Salmonella Typhi (18.8%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (18.8%) and Escherichia coli (12.5%). High antibiotic resistance rates to first line antibiotics were observed, particularly among Gram-negative pathogens. In addition, decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility and extended-spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) production was reported for one NTS isolate each. ESBL production was observed in 3/8 E. coli isolates. In-hospital mortality was 8.2% and case-fatality rates for IBI (23.4%) were significantly higher compared to severe malaria (6.8%, p<0.001). Conclusions: Although severe malaria was the main cause of illness, IBI were not uncommon and had higher case-fatality rates. The high frequency, antibiotic resistance rates and mortality rates of community acquired IBI require improvement in hygiene, better diagnostic methods and revision of current treatment guidelines. © 2014 Maltha et al.

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