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Memphis, TN, United States

Srinivasan A.,St Jude Childrens Research Hospital | Srinivasan A.,University of Tennessee Health Science Center | Wang W.C.,University of Tennessee Health Science Center | Wang W.C.,St Jude Childrens Research Hospital | And 8 more authors.
Pediatric Blood and Cancer | Year: 2014

Background: Human rhinovirus (HRV), human coronavirus (hCoV), human bocavirus (hBoV), and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infections in children with sickle cell disease have not been well studied. Procedure: Nasopharyngeal wash specimens were prospectively collected from 60 children with sickle cell disease and acute respiratory illness, over a 1-year period. Samples were tested with multiplexed-PCR, using an automated system for nine respiratory viruses, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Bordetella pertussis. Clinical characteristics and distribution of respiratory viruses in patients with and without acute chest syndrome (ACS) were evaluated. Results: A respiratory virus was detected in 47 (78%) patients. Nine (15%) patients had ACS; a respiratory virus was detected in all of them. The demographic characteristics of patients with and without ACS were similar. HRV was the most common virus, detected in 29 of 47 (62%) patients. Logistic regression showed no association between ACS and detection of HRV, hCoV, hBoV, hMPV, and other respiratory pathogens. Co-infection with at least one additional respiratory virus was seen in 14 (30%) infected patients, and was not significantly higher in patients with ACS (P=0.10). Co-infections with more than two respiratory viruses were seen in seven patients, all in patients without ACS. Bacterial pathogens were not detected. Conclusion: HRV was the most common virus detected in children with sickle cell disease and acute respiratory illness, and was not associated with increased morbidity. Larger prospective studies with asymptomatic controls are needed to study the association of these emerging respiratory viruses with ACS in children with sickle cell disease. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source


Srinivasan A.,St Jude Childrens Research Hospital | Srinivasan A.,University of Tennessee Health Science Center | Flynn P.,University of Tennessee Health Science Center | Flynn P.,St Jude Childrens Research Hospital | And 8 more authors.
Pediatric Blood and Cancer | Year: 2013

Detection of respiratory viruses by molecular methods, in children without respiratory symptoms undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), has not been well described. A prospective study of 33 asymptomatic children detected respiratory viruses in 8 of 33 (24%) patients before HCT. Human rhinovirus (HRV) was detected in five patients, and human adenovirus (hADV) in three patients. Two additional patients shed HRV, and one shed human coronavirus (hCoV), post-HCT. Two patients had co-infections. Of the 11 asymptomatic patients where respiratory virus was detected, 3 (27%) later developed an upper respiratory tract infection, from the same virus. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source

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