Clinical Research Center for End Stage Renal Disease in Korea

Daegu, South Korea

Clinical Research Center for End Stage Renal Disease in Korea

Daegu, South Korea
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Kim H.,Seoul National University | An J.N.,Seoul National University | Kim D.K.,Seoul National University | Kim M.-H.,Clinical Research Center for End Stage Renal Disease in Korea | And 36 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

The outcomes of peritoneal dialysis (PD) in elderly patients have not been thoroughly investigated. We aimed to investigate the clinical outcomes and risk factors associated with PD in elderly patients. We conducted a prospective observational nationwide adult end-stage renal disease (ESRD) cohort study in Korea from August 2008 to March 2013. Among incident patients (n = 830), patient and technical survival rate, quality of life, and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) scores of elderly PD patients (≥65 years, n = 95) were compared with those of PD patients aged ≤49 years (n = 205) and 50∼64 years (n = 192); and elderly hemodialysis (HD) patients (n = 315). The patient death and technical failure were analyzed by cumulative incidence function. Competing risk regressions were used to assess the risk factors for survival. The patient survival rate of elderly PD patients was inferior to that of younger PD patients (P<0.001). However, the technical survival rate was similar (P = 0.097). Compared with elderly HD patients, the patient survival rate did not differ according to dialysis modality (P = 0.987). Elderly PD patients showed significant improvement in the BDI scores, as compared with the PD patients aged ≤49 years (P = 0.003). Low albumin, diabetes and low residual renal function were significant risk factors for the PD patient survival; and peritonitis was a significant risk factor for technical survival. Furthermore, low albumin and hospitalization were significant risk factors of patient survival among the elderly. The overall outcomes were similar between elderly PD and HD patients. PD showed the benefit in BDI and quality of life in the elderly. Additionally, the technical survival rate of elderly PD patients was similar to that of younger PD patients. Taken together, PD may be a comparable modality for elderly ESRD patients. © 2015 Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Choi J.-Y.,Kyungpook National University | Choi J.-Y.,Clinical Research Center for End Stage Renal Disease in Korea | Jang H.M.,Kyungpook National University | Jang H.M.,Clinical Research Center for End Stage Renal Disease in Korea | And 43 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Background: The impact of dialysis modality on survival is still somewhat controversial. Given possible differences in patients' characteristics and the cause and rate of death in different countries, the issue needs to be evaluated in Korean cohorts. Methods: A nationwide prospective observational cohort study (NCT00931970) was performed to compare survival between peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD). A total of 1,060 end-stage renal disease patients in Korea who began dialysis between September 1, 2008 and June 30, 2011 were followed through December 31, 2011. Results: The patients (PD, 30.6%; HD, 69.4%) were followed up for 16.3±7.9 months. PD patients were significantly younger, less likely to be diabetic, with lower body mass index, and larger urinary volume than HD patients. Infection was the most common cause of death. Multivariate Cox regression with the entire cohort revealed that PD tended to be associated with a lower risk of death compared to HD [hazard ratio (HR) 0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.36-1.08]. In propensity score matched pairs (n = 278 in each modality), cumulative survival probabilities for PD and HD patients were 96.9% and 94.1% at 12 months (P = 0.152) and 94.3% and 87.6% at 24 months (P = 0.022), respectively. Patients on PD had a 51% lower risk of death compared to those on HD (HR 0.49, 95% CI 0.25-0.97). Conclusions: PD exhibits superior survival to HD in the early period of dialysis, even after adjusting for differences in the patients' characteristics between the two modalities. Notably, the most common cause of death was infection in this Korean cohort. © 2013 Choi et al.


Kim D.H.,Seoul National University | Kim D.H.,Clinical Research Center for End Stage Renal Disease in Korea | Kim M.,Eulji University | Kim M.,Clinical Research Center for End Stage Renal Disease in Korea | And 14 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

The timing of referral to a nephrologist may influence the outcome of chronic kidney disease patients, but its impact has not been evaluated thoroughly. The results of a recent study showing an association between early referral and patient survival are still being debated. A total of 1028 patients newly diagnosed as end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from July 2008 to October 2011 were enrolled. Early referral (ER) was defined as patients meeting with a nephrologist more than a year before dialysis and dialysis education were provided, and all others were considered late referral (LR). The relationship of referral pattern with mortality in ESRD patients was explored using a Cox proportional hazards regression models. Time from referral to dialysis was significantly longer in 599 ER patients than in 429 LR patients (62.3±58.9 versus 2.9±3.4 months, P<0.001). Emergency HD using a temporary vascular catheter was required in 485 (47.2%) out of all patients and in 262 (43.7%) of ER compared with 223 (52.0%) of LR (P = 0.009). After 2 years of follow-up, the survival rate in ER was better than that in LR (hazard ratio [HR] 2.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-4.45, P = 0.007). In patients with diabetes nephropathy, patient survival was also significantly higher in ER than in LR (HR 4.74, 95% CI 1.73-13.00, P = 0.002). With increasing age, HR also increased. Timely referral to a nephrologist in the predialytic stage is associated with reduced mortality. © 2013 Kim et al.


Kwon O.,Kyungpook National University | Kwon O.,Clinical Research Center for End Stage Renal Disease in Korea | Jang H.M.,Kyungpook National University | Jang H.M.,Clinical Research Center for End Stage Renal Disease in Korea | And 46 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Background Anemia is an important risk factor for mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. However, higher hemoglobin (Hb) is not necessarily better, as seen in several studies. This study aimed to validate the clinical use of an Hb target of 10-11 g/dL in Korean HD patients. Methods A total of 1,276 HD patients from the Clinical Research Center (CRC) for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) were investigated in a prospective observational study. Cox proportional hazard analysis was conducted for each category of time-dependent Hb level and erythropoiesis- stimulating agent (ESA) dose, with subgroup analysis stratified by age and diabetes status. Results Using a reference Hb level of 10-11 g/dL, the hazard ratios (HRs) of death were 5.12 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.62-10.02, P <0.05) for Hb level <9.0 g/dL, and 2.03 (CI, 1.16- 3.69, P <0.05) for Hb level 9.0-10.0 g/dL, after adjustment for multiple clinical variables. However, an Hb level ≥11 g/dL was not associated with decreased mortality risk. In an adjusted model categorized by Hb and ESA dose, the risk of death at an Hb level <10 g/dL and a higher dose of ESA (≥126 U/kg/week) had an HR of 2.25 (CI, 1.03-4.92, P <0.05), as compared to Hb level 10-11 g/dL and a lower dose of ESA. In subgroup analysis, those older than 65 years or who were diabetic had greater risk for mortality only in Hb category <9.0 g/dL. However, there was no significant interaction between age or diabetes status and Hb. Conclusion Using CRC-ESRD data, we validated the association between Hb and ESA dose and mortality in Korean HD patients. The clinical practice target of an Hb of 10-11 g/dL before the new KDIGO guideline era seems reasonable considering its survival benefit in HD patients. © 2015 Kwon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Jung H.-Y.,Kyungpook National University | Jung H.-Y.,Clinical Research Center for End Stage Renal Disease in Korea | Kim K.-H.,Kyungpook National University | Kim K.-H.,Clinical Research Center for End Stage Renal Disease in Korea | And 16 more authors.
Transplant Infectious Disease | Year: 2014

Rhabdomyolysis is a pathological syndrome caused by skeletal muscle cell damage that affects the integrity of the cellular membrane and leads to the release of toxic intracellular constituents into the bloodstream. Although cytomegalovirus (CMV) has rarely been reported as a cause of rhabdomyolysis, CMV infection could be considered as a possible cause because of its clinical significance in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). We report 2 cases of rhabdomyolysis associated with CMV infection in KTRs. A 64-year-old woman (Case 1) and a 65-year-old man (Case 2), who had each received a kidney from a living unrelated donor, were admitted with complaints of weakness in both legs and myalgia. Laboratory findings revealed highly increased creatine phosphokinase and myoglobinuria. In both cases, no recent alterations of medications had occurred, and other causes of rhabdomyolysis-such as trauma, alcohol, drugs, and electrolyte abnormalities - were excluded. CMV pp65 antigen was positive, and patients were diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis associated with CMV infection. Both patients recovered without complications after ganciclovir treatment. In conclusion, CMV infection should be considered as a possible cause of rhabdomyolysis in KTRs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.


Cho J.-H.,Kyungpook National University | Cho J.-H.,Clinical Research Center for End Stage Renal Disease in Korea | Lim J.-H.,Kyungpook National University | Lim J.-H.,Clinical Research Center for End Stage Renal Disease in Korea | And 18 more authors.
Transplant Infectious Disease | Year: 2014

Background: The optimal duration of antiviral therapy for kidney transplant recipients (KTR) with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains unclear. We reported the long-term outcomes after withdrawal of antiviral agent in KTR with chronic HBV infection. Methods: We retrospectively investigated the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive KTR with antiviral agents between January 2002 and January 2012. Antiviral treatments were withdrawn in patients who met all of the following 7 criteria: (i) no clinical and histologic evidence of cirrhosis, (ii) normal liver biochemistry, (iii) negative for both HBV DNA and hepatitis B envelope antigen (HBeAg), (iv) no resistance to antiviral agent, (v) antiviral therapy > 9 months, (vi) maintenance dosage of immunosuppressant for > 3 months, and (vii) no history of acute rejection during recent 6 months. All patients were followed regularly at approximately 3-6 months for liver enzyme, viral markers, and HBV DNA level after antiviral withdrawal. Results: Among a total of 445 KTR, 14 HBsAg-positive patients were included in this study. Antiviral agents were used, with lamivudine in 11 patients, and with adefovir, entecavir, and telbivudine in 3 patients, respectively. Discontinuation of antiviral agent was attempted in 6 (42.9%) of 14 patients who satisfied the criteria. The median duration of antiviral therapy before withdrawal was 14.3 months (range, 9-24 months). Four (66.7%) of 6 patients were successfully withdrawn and remained negative for HBV DNA for a median 60.5 months (range, 47-82 months). The baseline HBV DNA level was not related to maintenance of remission after withdrawal. Two reactivated patients resumed antiviral treatment immediately, with subsequent normalization of HBV DNA. During the follow-up, 1 patient developed hepatocellular carcinoma; however, no patient death or graft failure was reported for all HBsAg-positive KTR. Conclusions: Antiviral therapy can be discontinued successfully and safely in selected KTR with chronic HBV infection, after complete suppression of HBV and sufficient duration of antiviral therapy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Choi J.-Y.,Kyungpook National University | Choi J.-Y.,Clinical Research Center for End Stage Renal Disease in Korea | Yoon Y.J.,Korea Basic Science Institute | Choi H.-J.,Kyungpook National University | And 14 more authors.
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation | Year: 2011

Background. The body metabolism of patients with end-stage renal disease may be altered in response to long-term dialysis treatment. Moreover, the pattern of serum metabolites could change depending on the type of dialysis modality used. However, dialysis modality-dependent changes in serum metabolites are poorly understood. Our aim was to profile comprehensively serum metabolites by exploiting a novel method of 1H-NMR-based metabonomics and identify the differences in metabolite patterns in subjects receiving haemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD).Methods. Anuric and non-diabetic HD patients were matched to PD patients for age, sex and dialysis duration. Accurate concentrations of serum metabolites were determined using the target-profiling procedure, and differences in the levels of metabolites were compared using multivariate analysis.Results. Principal Components Analysis score plots showed that the metabolic patterns could be discriminated by dialysis modalities. Hypoxanthine and inosine were present only with HD, whereas serum xanthine oxidase activity and uric acid levels were not different. In contrast, PD was associated with higher levels of lactate, glucose, maltose, pyruvate, succinate, alanine, and glutamate linked to glucose metabolism and the tri-carboxylic acid cycle. Maltose appeared only in patients using icodextrin solution for PD. Known uraemic retention solutes such as urea, creatinine, myo-inositol and trimethylamine-N-oxide were increased in both dialysis groups.Conclusions. Metabonomics shows apparent differences in the profiles of serum metabolites between HD and PD, which were influenced by dialysis-related processes. Inosine and hypoxanthine are present only in HD patients, which is likely to represent more hypoxic and oxidative stress. © 2010 The Author.


Hong K.-D.,Kyungpook National University | Hong K.-D.,Clinical Research Center for End Stage Renal Disease in Korea | Bae J.H.,Kyungpook National University | Jang Y.-J.,Kyungpook National University | And 12 more authors.
Korean Journal of Internal Medicine | Year: 2013

Background/Aims: Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is an often-fatal complication of long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD). We here report the clinical features of EPS in Korean PD patients from a single university center. Methods: The data were collected retrospectively from 606 PD patients at Kyungpook National University Hospital, between August 2001 and August 2011. The diagnosis of EPS was based on clinical signs and symptoms, and confirmed by radiological findings. Results: Eight patients (1.3%, four males) were diagnosed with EPS. The mean age of the patients was 48.5 years (range, 33 to 65). The mean duration of PD was 111.8 months (range, 23 to 186). All patients except for one had three or more episodes of peritonitis. Seven patients were diagnosed with EPS after stopping PD, and only one stayed on PD after initial diagnosis and treatment. Total parenteral nutrition and corticosteroids, in addition to tamoxifen therapy, were used to treat most of the patients, and one patient underwent surgery (adhesiolysis). The overall mortality rate was 50%. Conclusions: EPS is a serious, life-threatening complication in patients on long-term PD. To reduce the incidence and mortality rate of EPS, careful monitoring and early diagnosis is needed. © 2013 The Korean Association of Internal Medicine.


Kwon O.,Kyungpook National University | Kwon O.,Clinical Research Center for End Stage Renal Disease in Korea | Cho J.-H.,Kyungpook National University | Cho J.-H.,Clinical Research Center for End Stage Renal Disease in Korea | And 10 more authors.
Transplantation Proceedings | Year: 2013

Background: Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has been used worldwide as part of maintenance immunosuppression since initial large cyclosporine-based trials reported that compared with azathioprine (AZA), MMF reduced acute rejection episodes after renal transplantation. However, long-term benefits of MMF have not been established; the follow-up period of previous studies was within 5 years. The aim of this study was to compare the acute rejection rates, allograft function, and graft and patient survivals of these 2 drugs in conjunction with cyclosporine and steroids over a period of 10 years. Methods: We reviewed recipients who had undergone kidney transplantation from January 1998 to January 2002. Eighty-six patients were divided into 2 groups (MMF = 43, AZA = 43). All patients received cyclosporine and steroids concomitantly as maintenance immunosuppressive therapy. Results: Baseline characteristics were similar between the 2 groups except donor type. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed MMF therapy to reduce the acute rejection rate in the first 12 months after transplantation (relative risk [RR], 0.181; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.035-0.936; P =.042). Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed MMF to was not associated with improved graft and patient survival. Graft function was comparable between the 2 groups over 10 years. No significant differences were observed in the incidence of serious infections or malignancy. Conclusions: Compared with AZA, MMF offered the clinical benefit of prevention of acute rejection episodes, but displayed similar effects on long-term graft and patient survivals in kidney transplant recipients undergoing cyclosporine-based immunosuppression. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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