Time filter

Source Type

Donini L.M.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Savina C.,Rehabilitation Clinical Institute | Gennaro E.,University of Rome La Sapienza | De Felice M.R.,Rehabilitation Clinical Institute | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging | Year: 2012

Introduction: Obesity is a risk factor for chronic diseases and premature mortality, but the extent of these associations among the elderly is under debate. The aim of this systematic literature review (SR) is to collate and critically assess the available information of the impact of obesity on mortality in the elderly. Methods: In PubMed, there are three-hundred twelve papers on the relationship between obesity and mortality among older adults. These papers were analysed on the basis of their abstracts, and sixteen studies were considered suitable for the purpose of the study. It was possible to perform a pooled estimate for aggregated data in three different studies. Conclusion: The results of this SR document that an increased mortality in obese older adults. The limitation of BMI to index obesity and the noted protective action of a moderate increase in BMI on mortality are highlighted. Waist circumference is an indicator of central adiposity and potentially as good a risk factor for mortality as BMI in obese elderly adults. © 2012 The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging.


Donini L.M.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Cannella C.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Savina C.,Rehabilitation Clinical Institute
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2010

A two-way relation exists between food and health. In fact, food intake and nutritional status may influence health status (modifying life span, function modulation and the prevalence of chronic diseases) and, in the same way, health status (comorbidity in particular in the elderly) can influence food intake and nutritional status (nutritional frailty). Research in food science may positively affect the relation between food and health. It is however necessary to guide this process with wisdom. Otherwise, the price we have to pay for this is a dysfunctional food pyramid, looking like the tower of Babel, where under- and over-nutrition and nutrient toxicity are present at the same time. A two-way relation exists between food and health. In fact, food intake and nutritional status may influence health status and, in the same way, health status can influence food intake and nutritional status. This complex relation may represent an important prospective objective of research in food science.

Loading Rehabilitation Clinical Institute collaborators
Loading Rehabilitation Clinical Institute collaborators