Clinical Outcomes Research Unit

Massachusetts, Massachusetts, United States

Clinical Outcomes Research Unit

Massachusetts, Massachusetts, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Gliklich E.,Clinical Outcomes Research Unit | Guo R.,Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary | Guo R.,Harvard University | Bergmark R.W.,Clinical Outcomes Research Unit | And 2 more authors.
Preventive Medicine Reports | Year: 2016

Texting and other cell-phone related distracted driving is estimated to account for thousands of motor vehicle collisions each year but studies examining the specific cell phone reading and writing activities of drivers are limited. The objective of this study was to describe the frequency of cell-phone related distracted driving behaviors. A national, representative, anonymous panel of 1211 United States drivers was recruited in 2015 to complete the Distracted Driving Survey (DDS), an 11-item validated questionnaire examining cell phone reading and writing activities and at what speeds they occur. Higher DDS scores reflect more distraction. DDS scores were analyzed by demographic data and self-reported crash rate. Nearly 60% of respondents reported a cell phone reading or writing activity within the prior 30 days, with reading texts (48%), writing texts (33%) and viewing maps (43%) most frequently reported. Only 4.9% of respondents had enrolled in a program aimed at reducing cell phone related distracted driving. DDS scores were significantly correlated to crash rate (p < 0.0001), with every one point increase associated with an additional 7% risk of a crash (p < 0.0001). DDS scores were inversely correlated to age (p < 0.0001). The DDS demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.94). High rates of cell phone-related distraction are reported here in a national sample. Distraction is associated with crash rates and occurs across all age groups, but is highest in younger drivers. The DDS can be used to evaluate the impact of public health programs aimed at reducing cell-phone related distracted driving. © 2016


Gliklich R.E.,Clinical Outcomes Research Unit | Gliklich R.E.,Harvard University | Metson R.,Harvard University
Laryngoscope | Year: 2015

Accurate assessment of patient outcome after sinus surgery requires the collection of valid and reliable data. Symptom-based surveys were administered in a prospective maImer to 104 patients with chronic sinusitis. Test-retest reliability for the Chronic Sinusitis Survey based on duration of symptoms (0.86, P


PubMed | Clinical Outcomes Research Unit and Harvard University
Type: | Journal: Preventive medicine reports | Year: 2016

Texting and other cell-phone related distracted driving is estimated to account for thousands of motor vehicle collisions each year but studies examining the specific cell phone reading and writing activities of drivers are limited. The objective of this study was to describe the frequency of cell-phone related distracted driving behaviors. A national, representative, anonymous panel of 1211 United States drivers was recruited in 2015 to complete the Distracted Driving Survey (DDS), an 11-item validated questionnaire examining cell phone reading and writing activities and at what speeds they occur. Higher DDS scores reflect more distraction. DDS scores were analyzed by demographic data and self-reported crash rate. Nearly 60% of respondents reported a cell phone reading or writing activity within the prior 30days, with reading texts (48%), writing texts (33%) and viewing maps (43%) most frequently reported. Only 4.9% of respondents had enrolled in a program aimed at reducing cell phone related distracted driving. DDS scores were significantly correlated to crash rate (p<0.0001), with every one point increase associated with an additional 7% risk of a crash (p<0.0001). DDS scores were inversely correlated to age (p<0.0001). The DDS demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbachs alpha=0.94). High rates of cell phone-related distraction are reported here in a national sample. Distraction is associated with crash rates and occurs across all age groups, but is highest in younger drivers. The DDS can be used to evaluate the impact of public health programs aimed at reducing cell-phone related distracted driving.

Loading Clinical Outcomes Research Unit collaborators
Loading Clinical Outcomes Research Unit collaborators