Dietetics and Clinical Nutrition Unit

Bolzano, Italy

Dietetics and Clinical Nutrition Unit

Bolzano, Italy

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Poli A.,NFI Nutrition Foundation of Italy | Marangoni F.,NFI Nutrition Foundation of Italy | Avogaro A.,University of Padua | Barba G.,CNR Institute of Food Sciences | And 32 more authors.
Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases | Year: 2013

Aims: The aim of this consensus paper is to review the available evidence on the association between moderate alcohol use, health and disease and to provide a working document to the scientific and health professional communities. Data synthesis: In healthy adults and in the elderly, spontaneous consumption of alcoholic beverages within 30g ethanol/d for men and 15g/d for women is to be considered acceptable and do not deserve intervention by the primary care physician or the health professional in charge. Patients with increased risk for specific diseases, for example, women with familiar history of breast cancer, or subjects with familiar history of early cardiovascular disease, orcardiovascular patients should discuss with their physician their drinking habits. Noabstainer should be advised to drink for health reasons. Alcohol use must be discouraged in specific physiological or personal situations or in selected age classes (children and adolescents, pregnant and lactating women and recovering alcoholics). Moreover, the possible interactions between alcohol and acute or chronic drug use must be discussed with the primary care physician. Conclusions: The choice to consume alcohol should be based on individual considerations, taking into account the influence on health and diet, the risk of alcoholism and abuse, the effect on behaviour and other factors that may vary with age and lifestyle. Moderation in drinking and development of an associated lifestyle culture should be fostered. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Agnello E.,Dietetics and Clinical Nutrition Unit | Malfi G.,Dietetics and Clinical Nutrition Unit | Costantino A.M.,Dietetics and Clinical Nutrition Unit | Massarenti P.,Laboratory of Clinical Nutrition | And 4 more authors.
Eating and Weight Disorders | Year: 2012

OBJECTIVE: Aim of the study was to evaluate tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) axis and oxidative status in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) seeking a possible correlation with both nutritional status and evolution of the disease. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Thirty-nine consecutive women with AN and an age-matched healthy control group were studied. Patients were 26±9 yr, with a body mass index (BMI) of 13.9±2 kg/m2. TNF-α, its receptors TNF-R55 and TNF-R75, and oxidative status markers (selenium, ascorbic/dehydroascorbic acid, retinol, α-tocopherol, selenium-dependent gluthatione peroxidase, reduced/oxidated gluthatione) were measured. A correlation with both nutritional indexes (body weight, BMI, albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, lymphocyte count) and disease duration was investigated. Pearson's correlation and unpaired Student's t-test were used to compare patients and controls. RESULTS: TNF-α and oxidative status markers were significantly higher in patients than controls and TNF-α was directly related to dehydroascorbic acid (p<0.05). Both TNF-R55 and TNF-R75 were higher in patients with duration of disease longer than one year as compared to controls and patients with shorter duration. Receptors inversely correlated with BMI (p<0.05 and p<0.01) and directly with disease duration (p<0.05). Inverse correlation between disease duration and BMI was present (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The study showed activation of TNF-α axis and oxidative stress in AN patients, as well as correlation between the two systems. Due to the correlation between TNF receptors and both BMI and disease duration, a possible role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the evolution of the eating disorder is suggested. ©2012, Editrice Kurtis.


Marangoni F.,Nutrition Foundation of Italy NFI | Corsello G.,University of Palermo | Cricelli C.,Italian Society of General Medicine SIMG | Ferrara N.,University of Naples Federico II | And 4 more authors.
Food and Nutrition Research | Year: 2015

The relationship between the consumption of meat and health is multifaceted, and it needs to be analyzed in detail, with specific attention to the relevant differences that characterize the effects of the different meat types, as yet considered by only a limited literature. A variable but moderate energy content, highly digestible proteins (with low levels of collagen) of good nutritional quality, unsaturated lipids (mainly found in the skin and easily removed), B-group vitamins (mainly thiamin, vitamin B6, and pantothenic acid), and minerals (like iron, zinc, and copper) make poultry meat a valuable food. Epidemiological studies performed across the world, in highly diverse populations with different food preferences and nutritional habits, provide solid information on the association between poultry consumption, within a balanced diet, and good health. Consumption of poultry meat, as part of a vegetable-rich diet, is associated with a risk reduction of developing overweight and obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Also, white meat (and poultry in particular) is considered moderately protective or neutral on cancer risk. The relevance of poultry meat for humans also has been recognized by the UN Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), who considers this widely available, relatively inexpensive food to be particularly useful in developing countries, where it can help to meet shortfalls in essential nutrients. Moreover, poultry meat consumption also contributes to the overall quality of the diet in specific ages and conditions (prior to conception, during pregnancy up to the end of breastfeeding, during growth, and in the geriatric age) and is suitable for those who have an increased need for calorie and protein compared to the general population. © 2015 Franca Marangoni et al.


PubMed | Italian Agricultural Research Council, Nutrition Foundation of Italy NFI, Italian Society of General Medicine SIMG, Dietetics and Clinical Nutrition Unit and 2 more.
Type: | Journal: Food & nutrition research | Year: 2015

The relationship between the consumption of meat and health is multifaceted, and it needs to be analyzed in detail, with specific attention to the relevant differences that characterize the effects of the different meat types, as yet considered by only a limited literature. A variable but moderate energy content, highly digestible proteins (with low levels of collagen) of good nutritional quality, unsaturated lipids (mainly found in the skin and easily removed), B-group vitamins (mainly thiamin, vitamin B6, and pantothenic acid), and minerals (like iron, zinc, and copper) make poultry meat a valuable food. Epidemiological studies performed across the world, in highly diverse populations with different food preferences and nutritional habits, provide solid information on the association between poultry consumption, within a balanced diet, and good health. Consumption of poultry meat, as part of a vegetable-rich diet, is associated with a risk reduction of developing overweight and obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Also, white meat (and poultry in particular) is considered moderately protective or neutral on cancer risk. The relevance of poultry meat for humans also has been recognized by the UN Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), who considers this widely available, relatively inexpensive food to be particularly useful in developing countries, where it can help to meet shortfalls in essential nutrients. Moreover, poultry meat consumption also contributes to the overall quality of the diet in specific ages and conditions (prior to conception, during pregnancy up to the end of breastfeeding, during growth, and in the geriatric age) and is suitable for those who have an increased need for calorie and protein compared to the general population.


Ronzani G.,Dietetics and Clinical Nutrition Unit | Giaretta R.,Vicenza League Against Cancer | Morello M.,Dietetics and Clinical Nutrition Unit
Mediterranean Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism | Year: 2011

The relation between oxidative stress and tamoxifen is not completely clear, since some studies attribute a possible antioxidant action, while others describe several pro-oxidative effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate oxidative stress in patients treated with tamoxifen and the effect of administration of green tea catechins on this parameter. Tests aimed at evaluating the derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites (d-Roms test) and the antioxidant reserve (BAP test) were adopted to estimate oxidative stress. Subjects treated with tamoxifen received Categ [Sofar] (green tea extract with 200 mg of catechins, 2 tablets twice a day for 3 weeks), according to a crossover design. High or very high antioxidant stress levels were found in all the 46 patients treated with tamoxifen, while in a control group of 18 patients treated with aromatase inhibitors or who had no longer been treated with tamoxifen for 1 year or more, high or very high oxidative stress levels were found in 66.7% of cases (p<0.0001). The antioxidant reserve was low in 52% of patients treated with tamoxifen versus 40% of the patients in the control group, but the difference was not statistically significant (p = n.s.). The levels of oxidative stress and antioxidant reserve did not change significantly in a subgroup where the patients took Categ for 3 weeks followed by 3 weeks washout (group A), while there was a statistical significant reduction in the levels of oxidative stress (p<0.05) and an increase in the antioxidant reserve (p<0.01) in the subgroup where 3 weeks of no treatment were followed by 3 weeks of treatment with Categ (group B). In conclusion, our study confirms a pro-oxidant effect of tamoxifen. The supplementation with green tea catechins gave discordant results. A high number of variables might intervene in the delicate oxidative-reductive equilibrium of human beings and, despite progress achieved in the last few years, there are several aspects concerning the oxidative-reductive equilibrium that still have to be explained. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.


PubMed | Dietetics and Clinical Nutrition Unit
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Eating and weight disorders : EWD | Year: 2012

Aim of the study was to evaluate tumour necrosis factor (TNF-) axis and oxidative status in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) seeking a possible correlation with both nutritional status and evolution of the disease.Thirty-nine consecutive women with AN and an age-matched healthy control group were studied. Patients were 269 yr, with a body mass index (BMI) of 13.92 kg/m(2). TNF-, its receptors TNF-R55 and TNF-R75, and oxidative status markers (selenium, ascorbic/ dehydroascorbic acid, retinol, -tocopherol, selenium-dependent gluthatione peroxidase, reduced/oxidated gluthatione) were measured. A correlation with both nutritional indexes (body weight, BMI, albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, lymphocyte count) and disease duration was investigated. Pearsons correlation and unpaired Students t-test were used to compare patients and controls.TNF- and oxidative status markers were significantly higher in patients than controls and TNF- was directly related to dehydroascorbic acid (p<0.05). Both TNF-R55 and TNF-R75 were higher in patients with duration of disease longer than one year as compared to controls and patients with shorter duration. Receptors inversely correlated with BMI (p<0.05 and p<0.01) and directly with disease duration (p<0.05). Inverse correlation between disease duration and BMI was present (p<0.01).The study showed activation of TNF- axis and oxidative stress in AN patients, as well as correlation between the two systems. Due to the correlation between TNF receptors and both BMI and disease duration, a possible role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the evolution of the eating disorder is suggested.

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