Clinical Neurophysiology Laboratory

Haifa, Israel

Clinical Neurophysiology Laboratory

Haifa, Israel
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Javaid M.A.,Clinical Neurophysiology Laboratory | Glazman S.,Neurology | Bodis-Wollner I.,SUNY Downstate Medical Center
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience | Year: 2010

We quantified the anterior-posterior distribution of the gamma modulation index (GMI), an index of perisaccadic phasic modulation of the gamma (35-45 Hz) range electroencephalogram (EEG), in healthy human subjects and Parkinson disease (PD) patients. The EEG was recorded over the frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital sites in 11 idiopathic PD patients (age 50-70 years, four females), 4 age matched healthy volunteers (1 female) and 17 young healthy controls (age 21-30 years, four females) Eye movements were recorded with EOG and ISCAN camera. Subjects executed saccades to a mark at right and back to fixation point and vice versa. The saccades directed away from center/fixation (centrifugal CF) were analyzed. Two minutes of EEG were obtained from each subject for the two possible saccade types (centrifugal rightwards and leftwards at 15 degrees). Each perisaccadic EEG segment was analyzed using continuous wavelet transform for quantifying the power and time course of gamma EEG ranges for each saccade type. A three way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis. Perisaccadic GMI (peak intrasaccadic power divided by mean power) in healthy subjects was higher over the contralateral hemisphere to the saccade direction, for both centrifugal saccades at anterior, posterior and occipital recording sites. Contrary to the healthy subject GMI remained near one in PD, i.e., there was no evidence of intrasaccadic gamma power increase in PD patients.


Granovsky Y.,Rambam Medical Center | Granovsky Y.,Clinical Neurophysiology Laboratory | Liem K.S.,University Utrecht | Weissman-Fogel I.,Haifa University | And 4 more authors.
European Journal of Pain (United Kingdom) | Year: 2016

Background 'Virtual lesion' ('VL') is a transient disruption of cortical activity during task performance. It can be induced by single pulses or short trains of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) directed to functionally relevant brain areas. We applied 'VL' methodology of a short train of TMS given on top of experimental tonic pain, expecting to see changes in pain scores. Methods Thirty young healthy subjects (15 women) were assessed with active ('VL') or 'sham' TMS in different sessions, randomly. In each session, 30 sec-long contact heat (47.5 °C, right forearm) was applied stand-alone ('baseline') and with 5 sec-long 10 Hz-TMS over left primary motor cortex (M1) starting at 17 sec of the heat stimulation. Results Pain scores decreased after 'VL' or 'sham' (p < 0.001). Independently of the type of TMS, pain reduction was stronger in women (p = 0.012). A triple Sex x Stimulation type ('VL' or 'sham') x Condition ('baseline' heat pain vs. heat pain with TMS) interaction (p = 0.027) indicated stronger pain reduction by 'VL' in women (p = 0.008) and not in men (p = 0.78) as compared to 'baseline'. Pain catastrophizing and perceived stress ratings affected the model (p = 0.010 and p < 0.001, respectively), but without sex differences. Conclusions This study indicates that interactions between cortical excitability of the motor cortex and nociceptive processing may be gender-related. © 2015 European Pain Federation.


PubMed | SuperComputing Applications and Innovation CINECA, University of Perugia, Clinical Neurophysiology Laboratory, Molecular Medicine Laboratory and Instituto Superiore Of Sanita
Type: | Journal: Scientific reports | Year: 2016

Dysfunction of the inwardly-rectifying potassium channels Kir4.1 (KCNJ10) represents a pathogenic mechanism contributing to Autism-Epilepsy comorbidity. To define the role of Kir4.1 variants in the disorder, we sequenced KCNJ10 in a sample of affected individuals, and performed genotype-phenotype correlations. The effects of mutations on channel activity, protein trafficking, and astrocyte function were investigated in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and in human astrocytoma cell lines. An in vivo model of the disorder was also explored through generation of kcnj10a morphant zebrafish overexpressing the mutated human KCNJ10. We detected germline heterozygous KCNJ10 variants in 19/175 affected children. Epileptic spasms with dysregulated sensory processing represented the main disease phenotype. When investigated on astrocyte-like cells, the p.R18Q mutation exerted a gain-of-function effect by enhancing Kir4.1 membrane expression and current density. Similarly, the p.R348H variant led to gain of channel function through hindrance of pH-dependent current inhibition. The frequent polymorphism p.R271C seemed, instead, to have no obvious functional effects. Our results confirm that variants in KCNJ10 deserve attention in autism-epilepsy, and provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of autism and seizures. Similar to neurons, astrocyte dysfunction may result in abnormal synaptic transmission and electrical discharge, and should be regarded as a possible pharmacological target in autism-epilepsy.


PubMed | Clinical Neurophysiology Laboratory
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Clinical EEG and neuroscience | Year: 2010

We quantified the anterior-posterior distribution of the gamma modulation index (GMI), an index of perisaccadic phasic modulation of the gamma (35-45 Hz) range electroencephalogram (EEG), in healthy human subjects and Parkinson disease (PD) patients. The EEG was recorded over the frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital sites in 11 idiopathic PD patients (age 50-70 years, four females), 4 age matched healthy volunteers (1 female) and 17 young healthy controls (age 21-30 years, four females) Eye movements were recorded with EOG and ISCAN camera. Subjects executed saccades to a mark at right and back to fixation point and vice versa. The saccades directed away from center/fixation (centrifugal CF) were analyzed. Two minutes of EEG were obtained from each subject for the two possible saccade types (centrifugal rightwards and leftwards at 15 degrees). Each perisaccadic EEG segment was analyzed using continuous wavelet transform for quantifying the power and time course of gamma EEG ranges for each saccade type. A three way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis. Perisaccadic GMI (peak intrasaccadic power divided by mean power) in healthy subjects was higher over the contralateral hemisphere to the saccade direction, for both centrifugal saccades at anterior, posterior and occipital recording sites. Contrary to the healthy subject GMI remained near one in PD, i.e., there was no evidence of intrasaccadic gamma power increase in PD patients.


Granovsky Y.,Clinical Neurophysiology Laboratory | Granovsky Y.,Rambam Health Care Campus | Anand P.,Imperial College London | Nakae A.,Osaka University | And 3 more authors.
Pain | Year: 2016

There has been a significant increase over recent years in the use of contact heat evoked potentials (CHEPs) for the evaluation of small nerve fiber function. Measuring CHEP amplitude and latency has clinical utility for the diagnosis and assessment of conditions with neuropathic pain. This international multicenter study aimed to provide reference values for CHEPs to stimuli at 5 commonly examined body sites. Contact heat evoked potentials were recorded from 226 subjects (114 females), distributed per age decade between 20 and 79 years. Temperature stimuli were delivered by a thermode (32°C-51°C at a rate of 70°C/s). In phase I of the study, we investigated side-to-side differences and reported the maximum normal side-to-side difference in Aδ CHEP peak latency and amplitude for leg, forearm, and face. In phase II, we obtained normative data for 3 CHEP parameters (N 2 P 2 amplitude, N 2 latency, and P 2 latency), stratified for gender and age decades from face, upper and lower limbs, and overlying cervical and lumbar spine. In general, larger CHEP amplitudes were associated with higher evoked pain scores. Females had CHEPs of larger amplitude and shorter latency than males. This substantive data set of normative values will facilitate the clinical use of CHEPs as a rapid, noninvasive, and objective technique for the assessment of patients presenting with neuropathic pain. © 2016 International Association for the Study of Pain.

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