Clinical Immunology and Allergy

Irákleion, Greece

Clinical Immunology and Allergy

Irákleion, Greece

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Zervou M.I.,Laboratory of Molecular Medicine and Human Genetics | Myrthianou E.,Laboratory of Molecular Medicine and Human Genetics | Flouri I.,Clinical Immunology and Allergy | Plant D.,Manchester Academy of Health science | And 10 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Treatment strategies blocking tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) have proven very successful in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), showing beneficial effects in approximately 50-60% of the patients. However, a significant subset of patients does not respond to anti-TNF agents, for reasons that are still unknown. The aim of this study was to validate five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of PTPRC, CD226, AFF3, MyD88 and CHUK gene loci that have previously been reported to predict anti-TNF outcome. In addition, two markers of RA susceptibility, namely TRAF1/C5 and STAT4 were assessed, in a cohort of anti-TNF-treated RA patients, from the homogeneous Greek island of Crete, Greece. The RA patient cohort consisted of 183 patients treated with either of 3 anti-TNF biologic agents (infliximab, adalimumab and etanercept) from the Clinic of Rheumatology of the University Hospital of Crete. The SNPs were genotyped by TaqMan assays or following the Restriction Fragments Length Polymorphisms (RFLPs) approach. Disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28) at baseline and after 6 months were available for all patients and analysis of good versus poor response at 6 months was performed for each SNP. None of the 7 genetic markers correlated with treatment response. We conclude that the gene polymorphisms under investigation are not strongly predictive of anti-TNF response in RA patients from Greece. © 2013 Zervou et al.


PubMed | National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Divisions of Dermatology., Clinical Immunology and Allergy. and Divisions of Dermatology;
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Skinmed | Year: 2016

An 18-year-old Caucasian man presented with extensive recalcitrant verrucae on his trunk and extremities that were unresponsive to cryotherapy, salicylic acid, topical imiquimod, CO


Ryden A.,University of California at Los Angeles | Bando J.M.,Clinical Immunology and Allergy | Aysola R.S.,Critical Care Medicine Clinical Immunology and Allergy
Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine | Year: 2014

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is the first-line treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Although the gold standard for the treatment of OSA, CPAP may not be the optimal modality to treat more complex sleep disordered breathing such as Cheyne-Stokes respirations, opioid-induced central apnea, and complex sleep disordered breathing related to chronic hypoventilation syndromes (obesity-hypoventilation syndrome, restrictive thoracic disease due to neuromuscular or thoracic cage disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Newer generation auto-adjusting PAP devices are increasingly being used to treat OSA. Advanced positive airway pressure modalities have been developed in an effort to improve treatment of the more complex sleep disordered breathing syndromes including automated servo ventilation and volume-targeted pressure-limited ventilation. This article is intended to provide the clinician reader with a description of newer PAP modalities, a review of evidence-supported indications for use, as well as to provide a framework for managing patients with advanced positive airway pressure therapy. © 2014 by Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc.


PubMed | University of California at Los Angeles and Clinical Immunology and Allergy
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Seminars in respiratory and critical care medicine | Year: 2014

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is the first-line treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Although the gold standard for the treatment of OSA, CPAP may not be the optimal modality to treat more complex sleep disordered breathing such as Cheyne-Stokes respirations, opioid-induced central apnea, and complex sleep disordered breathing related to chronic hypoventilation syndromes (obesity-hypoventilation syndrome, restrictive thoracic disease due to neuromuscular or thoracic cage disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Newer generation auto-adjusting PAP devices are increasingly being used to treat OSA. Advanced positive airway pressure modalities have been developed in an effort to improve treatment of the more complex sleep disordered breathing syndromes including automated servo ventilation and volume-targeted pressure-limited ventilation. This article is intended to provide the clinician reader with a description of newer PAP modalities, a review of evidence-supported indications for use, as well as to provide a framework for managing patients with advanced positive airway pressure therapy.


Vazgiourakis V.M.,University of Crete | Zervou M.I.,University of Crete | Choulaki C.,Clinical Immunology and Allergy | Bertsias G.,Clinical Immunology and Allergy | And 10 more authors.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases | Year: 2011

Background: In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) sustained CD40L expression by T cells and platelets activates a variety of cells via its receptor CD40 contributing to disease pathogenesis. Although CD40 has recently been identified in genome-wide association study as a novel rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility gene such an association has not been documented for SLE. Objective: To investigate whether the rs4810485 CD40 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is associated with increased risk for SLE and its impact on CD40 expression. Materials and methods: The primary sample set consisted of 351 patients with SLE and 670 matched healthy controls of Greek origin. 158 patients with SLE and 155 controls from Turkey were used as a replication sample. Genotyping of rs4810485 was performed by restriction fragment length polymorphism and the Sequenom MassArray technology. The expression of CD40 mRNA and protein was assessed in unstimulated and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells by quantitative real time PCR and flow cytometry, respectively. Results: The minor allele T of CD40 rs4810485 SNP was significantly under-represented in Greek patients with SLE compared with healthy controls (OR=0.65, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.79). The association was replicated in the Turkish cohort (OR=0.57, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.80; meta-analysis of 509 patients with SLE and 825 healthy controls: OR=0.63, 95% CI 0.53 to 0.74, p = 2×10 -8). In both cases and controls, the rs4810485 G/T and T/T genotypes were associated with significantly reduced CD40 mRNA and protein expression in peripheral blood CD14+ monocytes and CD19+ B cells compared with G/G genotype, both under basal conditions and following stimulation. Conclusions: CD40 has been identified as a new susceptibility locus in Greek and Turkish patients with SLE. The rs4810485 minor allele T is under-represented in SLE and correlates with reduced CD40 expression in peripheral blood monocytes and B cells, with potential implications for the regulation of aberrant immune responses in the disease.

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