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Moreno M.J.,Biomedical Research Institute Sant Pau | Moreno M.J.,University of Barcelona | Moreno M.J.,CIBER ISCIII | Bosch R.,University of Barcelona | And 16 more authors.
Journal of Pathology | Year: 2015

The chemokine receptor CXCR4 has been implicated in the migration and trafficking of malignant B cells in several haematological malignancies. Over-expression of CXCR4 has been identified in haematological tumours, but data concerning the role of this receptor in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) are lacking. CXCR4 is a marker of poor prognosis in various neoplasms, correlating with metastatic disease and decreased survival of patients. We studied CXCR4 involvement in cell migration in vitro and dissemination in vivo. We also evaluated the prognostic significance of CXCR4 in 94 biopsies of DLBCL patients. We observed that the level of expression of CXCR4 in DLBCL cell lines correlated positively with in vitro migration. Expression of the receptor was also associated with increased engraftment and dissemination, and decreased survival time in NOD/SCID mice. Furthermore, administration of a specific CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100, decreased dissemination of DLBCL cells in a xenograft mouse model. In addition, we found that CXCR4 expression is an independent prognostic factor for shorter overall survival and progression-free survival in DLBCL patients. These results show that CXCR4 mediates dissemination of DLBCL cells and define for the first time its value as an independent prognostic marker in DLBCL patients. © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Source


Bonet Saris A.,Clinica Girona
Nutrición hospitalaria : organo oficial de la Sociedad Española de Nutrición Parenteral y Enteral | Year: 2011

Energy requirements are altered in critically-ill patients and are influenced by the clinical situation, treatment, and phase of the process. Therefore, the most appropriate method to calculate calorie intake is indirect calorimetry. In the absence of this technique, fixed calorie intake (between 25 and 35 kcal/kg/day) or predictive equations such as the Penn State formula can be used to obtain a more accurate evaluation of metabolic rate. Carbohydrate administration should be limited to a maximum of 4 g/kg/day and a minimum of 2 g/kg/day. Plasma glycemia should be controlled to avoid hyperglycemia. Fat intake should be between 1 and 1.5 g/kg/day. The recommended protein intake is 1-1.5 g/kg/day but can vary according to the patient's clinical status. Particular attention should be paid to micronutrient intake. Consensus is lacking on micronutrient requirements. Some vitamins (A, B, C, E) are highly important in critically-ill patients, especially those undergoing continuous renal replacement techniques, patients with severe burns and alcoholics, although the specific requirements in each of these types of patient have not yet been established. Energy and protein intake in critically-ill patients is complex, since both clinical factors and the stage of the process must be taken into account. The first step is to calculate each patient's energy requirements and then proceed to distribute calorie intake among its three components: proteins, carbohydrates and fat. Micronutrient requirements must also be considered. Source


Garcia Figueiras R.,Complexo Hospitalario Universitario Of Santiago Of Compostela | Padhani A.R.,Paul Strickland Scanner Center | Vilanova J.C.,Clinica Girona | Goh V.,Paul Strickland Scanner Center | Villalba Martin C.,Complexo Hospitalario Universitario Of Santiago Of Compostela
Radiologia | Year: 2010

Most advances in conventional diagnostic imaging techniques have focused on improving the spatial resolution and speed of acquisition of images or on new contrast agents. However, tumors are extremely complex biological models with a series of characteristics like hypoxia, metabolism, cellularity, angiogenesis, and functionality of the lymph nodes that are very important in oncology but cannot be adequately studied with these diagnostic imaging methods. In this article, we discuss the possible contributions of different functional imaging techniques based on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or positron emission tomography to obtain information about different biological processes and characteristics that are very important for diagnosing, staging, planning treatment, evaluating the response to treatment, and monitoring the evolution of cancer patients, as well as for the development of new drugs. © 2008 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved. Source


Ghose S.,University of Girona | Ghose S.,CNRS Laboratory of Electronics Informatics and Images | Oliver A.,University of Girona | Marti R.,University of Girona | And 7 more authors.
International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery | Year: 2012

Purpose Prostate volume estimation from segmentation of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images aids in diagnosis and treatment of prostate hypertrophy and cancer. Computeraided accurate and computationally efficient prostate segmentation in TRUS images is a challenging task, owing to low signal-to-noise ratio, speckle noise, calcifications, and heterogeneous intensity distribution in the prostate region. Method A multi-resolution framework using texture features in a parametric deformable statistical model of shape and appearancewas developed to segment the prostate. Local phase information of log-Gabor quadrature filter extracted texture of the prostate region in TRUS images. Large bandwidth of log-Gabor filter ensures easy estimation of local orientations, and zero response for a constant signal provides invariance to gray level shift. This aids in enhanced representation of the underlying texture information of the prostate unaffected by speckle noise and imaging artifacts. The parametric model of the propagating contour is derived from principal component analysis of prior shape and texture information of the prostate from the training data. The parameters were modified using prior knowledge of the optimization space to achieve segmentation. Results The proposed method achieves a mean Dice similarity coefficient value of 0.95 ± 0.02 and mean absolute distance of 1.26 ± 0.51 millimeter when validated with 24 TRUS images of 6 data sets in a leave-one-patient-out validation framework. Conclusions The proposed method for prostate TRUS image segmentation is computationally efficient and provides accurate prostate segmentations in the presence of intensity heterogeneities and imaging artifacts. © CARS 2011. Source


Energy requirements are altered in critically-ill patients and are influenced by the clinical situation, treatment, and phase of the process. Therefore, the most appropriate method to calculate calorie intake is indirect calorimetry. In the absence of this technique, fixed calorie intake (between 25 and 35. kcal/kg/day) or predictive equations such as the Penn State formula can be used to obtain a more accurate evaluation of metabolic rate.Carbohydrate administration should be limited to a maximum of 4. g/kg/day and a minimum of 2. g/kg/day. Plasma glycemia should be controlled to avoid hyperglycemia. Fat intake should be between 1 and 1.5. g/kg/day. The recommended protein intake is 1-1.5. g/kg/day but can vary according to the patient's clinical status.Particular attention should be paid to micronutrient intake. Consensus is lacking on micronutrient requirements. Some vitamins (A, B, C, E) are highly important in critically-ill patients, especially those undergoing continuous renal replacement techniques, patients with severe burns and alcoholics, although the specific requirements in each of these types of patient have not yet been established. Energy and protein intake in critically-ill patients is complex, since both clinical factors and the stage of the process must be taken into account. The first step is to calculate each patient's energy requirements and then proceed to distribute calorie intake among its three components: proteins, carbohydrates and fat. Micronutrient requirements must also be considered. © 2011 Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Critica y Unidades Coronarias (SEMICYUC) and Elsevier España, S.L. Source

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