Dermatology Clinic for Animals

Las Vegas, NV, United States

Dermatology Clinic for Animals

Las Vegas, NV, United States

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Newbury S.,University of California at Davis | Moriello K.,University of Wisconsin - Madison | Coyner K.,Dermatology Clinic for Animals | Trimmer A.,Animal Allergy and Dermatology Specialists | Kunder D.,University of Wisconsin - Madison
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery | Year: 2015

Endemic Microsporum canis dermatophytosis was identified in a large, open admission, private, no-kill shelter that admitted >1200 cats per year. Fungal culture (FC) screening revealed that 166/210 (79%) and 38/99 (38%) cats in the non-public and public area were culture positive, respectively. However, pending screening FC results, the 99 cats in the public area were treated with once-weekly lime sulfur rinses and monitored with once-weekly FC. Cats in the non-public area were not treated. When FC results were available, cats were separated into low-risk (n = 61) and high-risk (n = 38) groups based upon the presence or absence of skin lesions. Low-risk cats continued to receive once-weekly topical lime sulfur and rapidly achieved culture-negative status. High-risk cats were divided into two groups based upon the number of colony-forming units/plate (low or high). All 38 cats were treated with twice-weekly lime sulfur and oral terbinafine and within 6–7 weeks only 5/38 cats were still FC-positive. These cats were moved to a separate room. Dermatophytosis was eradicated within 5 months; eradication was prolonged owing to reintroduction of disease into the remaining room of cats under treatment from three kittens returning from foster care. Continued admissions and adoptions were possible by the institution of intake procedures that specifically included careful Wood’s lamp examination to identify high-risk cats and use of a ‘clean break strategy’. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.


PubMed | Dermatology for Animals, West Dermatology, Dermatology Clinic for Animals and University of Arizona
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Veterinary dermatology | Year: 2016

Coccidioidomycosis is a fungal disease caused by the dimorphic saprophytic fungus Coccidioides immitis or C. posadasii. Primary pulmonary infection can disseminate to cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues, or less commonly direct cutaneous inoculation may occur.To characterize the historical, clinical, diagnostic and treatment findings in dogs and cats with cutaneous manifestation of coccidioidomycosis.Twenty three dogs and seventeen cats diagnosed between 2009 and 2015 in Arizona, USA.Retrospective review of medical records from dogs and cats from an endemic area with a confirmed diagnosis via histopathology, cytology and/or culture, and skin lesions.Age of affected dogs ranged from 14 weeks to 13 years (median = 7 years), whereas cats ranged from 3 to 17 years (median = 9 years). Subcutaneous nodules were the most common lesions in both species. Lesions were distributed widely and not often found over sites of bone infection. In 75% of dogs and 54.5% of cats with cutaneous lesions there were clinical signs of systemic illness, supporting the diagnosis of cutaneous disseminated disease. Four dogs and four cats had localized lesions with no systemic illness, consistent with possible primary cutaneous infection. The most common mode of diagnosis was cytology identification in both species. Fluconazole was the most commonly prescribed antifungal drug.Coccidioidomycosis is the most common mycosis of dogs and cats in endemic regions and cutaneous signs of the disease may be an initial presenting complaint. This study identified a variety of cutaneous manifestations of the disease in dogs and cats and should be recognized by clinicians.

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