Entity

Time filter

Source Type

London, United Kingdom

Climate Change Capital is a private asset management and advisory group founded in 2003 to support efforts to develop solutions to climate change and resource depletion. Wikipedia.


Idriss A.,Climate Change Capital
Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA | Year: 2011

The speculation about the need to cut greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by as much as 80% by 2050, makes it very costly, if not impossible, to build more coal electric generation. The current vagueness in the GHG polices is not conducive to investment in coal fired unit without Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) applied with a significant capture rate. CCS is not economically feasible, lack of detailed regulatory infrastructure and public disapproval due to possible CO 2 leakage. Governments around the world have been contemplating and debating carbon regulations for over a decade, but has there been a greater lack of certainty related to potential climate change regulation in North American. Both the Canadian and the US governments want to pass climate change regulations, but current economic and political conditions are stalling the efforts. A discussion covers the elements that highlight several challenges and the uncertainty facing industry and regulators in establishing balanced and effective climate change legislation, i.e., the lack of international alignment, cap and trade transforming into a trade issue, increasing likelihood of regional programs instead of nation wide, and performance standards are becoming a greater possibility. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 104th AWMA Annual Conference and Exhibition 2011 (Orlando, FL 6/21-24/2011). Source


McGlashan N.,Imperial College London | Shah N.,Imperial College London | Caldecott B.,Climate Change Capital | Workman M.,Imperial College London
Process Safety and Environmental Protection | Year: 2012

This paper presents results from research conducted to provide a high level techno-economic and performance assessments of various emerging technologies for capturing CO2 from the air, directly and indirectly, on a life-cycle basis. The technologies assessed include 'artificial trees', the soda lime process, augmented ocean disposal, biochar and bio-energy with carbon capture and storage. These technologies are subjected to quantitative and qualitative analyses, based on the most recent peer reviewed data in the literature, to identify their potential performance as well as the technical and non-technical barriers to their adoption and scale up. Key findings for each technology are presented which seek to highlight the state of technological development and research needs, the anticipated life cycle capture cost in $/tCO2 based on their potential to deliver a 0.1 ppm CO 2 reduction per annum, policy requirements for scale up and, in light of these findings, the likely role that they will play in addressing climate change and broader environmental issues in the medium to long term. The key finding from the work is that the degree of scale-up required for negative emissions technologies to have a material impact on atmospheric emissions (i.e. at a ppm level) is probably unrealistic in less than 20 years. Therefore, emissions prevention efforts should remain the main focus in addressing climate change and the likely role for negative emissions technologies will be in augmenting a suite of mitigation measures targeting economically or practically difficult emissions. © 2012 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. Source


Fox J.C.,University of Melbourne | Yosi C.K.,University of Melbourne | Yosi C.K.,Papua New Guinea Forest Research Institute | Nimiago P.,Papua New Guinea Forest Research Institute | And 4 more authors.
Biotropica | Year: 2010

Papua New Guinea (PNG) has become the focus of climate change mitigation initiatives such as reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, but defensible estimates of forest carbon are lacking. Here we present a methodology for estimating aboveground forest carbon, and apply it to a large Permanent Sample Plot system maintained by Papua New Guinea Forest Research Institute. We report the first estimates of forest carbon in lowland tropical forest in PNG. Average aboveground carbon in stems >10 cm diam. for 115 selectively harvested 1-ha plots in lowland tropical forest was 66.3±3.5 Mg C/ha (95% CI) while for 10 primary forest plots the average was 106.3±16.2 Mg C/ha. We applied ratios based on field observations, in-country studies, and the literature to estimate unmeasured pools of aboveground carbon (stems <10 cm diam., fine litter and coarse woody debris). Total aboveground carbon was estimated at 90.2 and 120.8 Mg C/ha in selectively harvested and primary lowland forest, respectively. Our estimate for primary tropical forest is lower than biome averages for tropical equatorial forest, and we hypothesize that frequent disturbances from fire, frost, landslides, and agriculture are limiting carbon stock development. The methodology and estimates presented here will assist the PNG government in its preparedness for mitigation initiatives, are of interest to communities that are seeking to participate in voluntary carbon markets, and will encourage transparency and consistency in the estimation of forest carbon. © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2010 by The Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation. Source


Ayers J.,Department of Energy, United Kingdom | Huq S.,International Institute for Environment and Development | Huq S.,International Center for Climate Change and Development | Wright H.,Imperial College London | And 2 more authors.
Climate and Development | Year: 2014

The close linkages between climate change adaptation and development have led to calls for addressing the two issues in an integrated way. ‘Mainstreaming' climate information, policies and measures into ongoing development planning and decision-making has been proposed as one solution, making a more sustainable, effective and efficient use of resources than designing and managing climate policies separately from ongoing activities. But what does mainstreaming look like in practice? This paper reviews the process of mainstreaming in Bangladesh, one of the countries that has made significant progress on adaptation planning and mainstreaming. The paper begins by making the case for mainstreaming, by exploring linkages and trade-offs between adaptation and development and reviewing the literature on mainstreaming. Second, it considers how to implement mainstreaming in practice, reviewing an existing four-step framework. Examining this framework against the plethora of mainstreaming experiences in Bangladesh, the paper considers how the framework can be used as a tool to review progress on mainstreaming in Bangladesh. The paper concludes that while the framework is useful for considering some of the preconditions necessary for mainstreaming, experiences in Bangladesh reflect a much more complex patchwork of processes and stakeholders that need to be taken into consideration in further research. © 2014, © 2014 The Author(s). Published by Taylor & Francis. Source


Ayers J.M.,International Institute for Environment and Development | Huq S.,International Institute for Environment and Development | Faisal A.M.,Asian Development Bank | Hussain S.T.,Climate Change Capital
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change | Year: 2014

The close linkages between climate change adaptation and development have led to calls for addressing the two issues in an integrated way. 'Mainstreaming' climate information, policies and measures into ongoing development planning and decision-making has been proposed as one solution, seen as making more sustainable, effective and efficient use of resources than designing and managing climate policies separately from ongoing development activities. But what does mainstreaming look like in practice? This article explores the process of mainstreaming, drawing on the country case study of Bangladesh, one of the countries that have made significant progress on adaptation planning and mainstreaming. The article begins by making the case for mainstreaming, by exploring the linkages and trade-offs between adaptation and development and describing the various approaches to mainstreaming from the literature. Second, it considers how to implement mainstreaming in practice, reviewing an existing four-step framework. Examining this framework against the plethora of mainstreaming experiences in Bangladesh, the article considers how the framework can be used as a tool for assessing the progress of mainstreaming progress in Bangladesh. The article concludes that while the framework is useful for considering some of the preconditions necessary for getting mainstreaming underway, experiences of mainstreaming in Bangladesh reflect a much more complex patchwork of processes and stakeholders that need to be taken into consideration in further research on this topic. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Source

Discover hidden collaborations