Cleveland, OH, United States

Cleveland State University

www.csuohio.edu
Cleveland, OH, United States

Cleveland State University is a public university located in downtown Cleveland, Ohio. It was established in 1964 when the state of Ohio assumed control of Fenn College, and it absorbed the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law in 1969. Today it is part of the University System of Ohio and has approximately 16,000 students and over 100,000 alumni. Wikipedia.

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Patent
Cleveland State University | Date: 2017-01-12

A method of creating a miniature multicellular biological construct and a method for studying cellular environments using the miniature multicellular biological construct is provided. The method for making the miniature multicellular biological construct includes suspending cells in a hydrogel, depositing the cell-suspension into a microwell, gelling the cell-suspension, and incubating the cell-suspension. The method for studying cellular environments includes imaging the miniature multicellular biological construct.


Patent
Cleveland State University | Date: 2015-05-28

Controller scaling and parameterization are described. Techniques that can be improved by employing the scaling and parameterization include, but are not limited to, controller design, tuning and optimization. The scaling and parameterization methods described here apply to transfer function based controllers, including PID controllers. The parameterization methods also applies to state feedback and state observer based controllers, as well as linear active disturbance rejection controllers. It is emphasized that this abstract is provided to comply with the rules requiring an abstract that will allow a searcher or other reader to quickly ascertain the subject matter of the application. It is submitted with the understanding that it will not be used to interpret or limit the scope or meaning of the claims.


Barik S.,Cleveland State University
BMC Medicine | Year: 2012

Influenza has a long history of causing morbidity and mortality in the human population through routine seasonal spread and global pandemics. The high mutation rate of the RNA genome of the influenza virus, combined with assortment of its multiple genomic segments, promote antigenic diversity and new subtypes, allowing the virus to evade vaccines and become resistant to antiviral drugs. There is thus a continuing need for new anti-influenza therapy using novel targets and creative strategies. In this review, we summarize prospective future therapeutic regimens based on recent molecular and genomic discoveries. © 2012 Barik; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Barik S.,Cleveland State University
Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology | Year: 2013

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a member of the Paramyxoviridae family that consists of viruses with nonsegmented negative-strand RNA genome. Infection by these viruses triggers the innate antiviral response of the host, mainly type I interferon (IFN). Essentially all other viruses of this family produce IFN suppressor functions by co-transcriptional RNA editing. In contrast, RSV has evolved two unique nonstructural proteins, NS1 and NS2, to effectively serve this purpose. Together, NS1 and NS2 degrade or sequester multiple signaling proteins that affect both IFN induction and IFN effector functions. While the mechanism of action of NS1 and NS2 is a subject of active research, their effect on adaptive immunity is also being recognized. In this review, we discuss various aspects of NS1 and NS2 function with implications for vaccine design. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013.


Patent
Cleveland State University | Date: 2016-06-23

Systems and methods to perform privacy-aware computer-vision-based human activity monitoring with real-time haptic feedback. The system and method described in this disclosure employing a registration process for consenting human subjects before their activities are monitored. The registration process involves the corroboration of human motion captured in different modalities, i.e., computer-vision-based via the programmable computer-vision-based motion sensor and accelerometer-based via the wearable device. The tracked human activities are assessed in real-time and upon detection of activities that violated predefined rules, haptic feedback is delivered in real-time to the tracked human subject via the wearable device worn by the caregiver.


Patent
Cleveland State University | Date: 2016-01-27

Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: Genetic Mechanisms | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2016

This project will examine telomerase function in the early lineage of eukaryotic evolution. Telomerase is an enzyme that is responsible for making telomeres, structures that protect the ends of all eukaryotic chromosomes, reminiscent of the hard ends of shoelaces. The genetic mechanism of telomere replication by telomerase is better studied in yeast and mammalian cells; far from each other as those two organisms are, they in fact represent relatively recent branches of eukaryotic phylogeny. In contrast, we study an ancient, deep branching lineage of eukaryotes, kinetoplastid protists. Our organism of choice, Trypanosoma brucei, has telomerase with unique structural and functional properties, and we will learn how this enzyme works. The project will encourage full participation from women and underrepresented minorities in science. Apart from training graduate and postdoctoral trainees, this project will also implement a three-year undergraduate program (BIOKEYS) in both PIs? laboratories; the major goal of this program will be to teach undergraduate researchers to value interdisciplinary sciences early in their research careers. In addition to gaining experience from designing experiments and problem solving using high-end technologies, students will be teaching and learning from each other as part of a research group.

Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein enzyme, provides the major means for elongation of chromosome ends (telomeres), thus counteracting the loss of linear DNA ends in each cell cycle due to incomplete DNA replication by conventional DNA polymerases. Telomerase has two core components, the Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT) that catalyzes telomere elongation, and the telomerase RNA (TER), which provides a template for telomere DNA synthesis. The mechanisms of telomere elongation by telomerase are poorly understood in Trypanosoma brucei, a deep branching Kinetoplastid. Therefore, this project dissects structural, biochemical and genetic features of telomerase RNA in T. brucei to understand the mechanism of telomerase regulation in early eukaryotic species. The recent discovery of the T. brucei TER reveals novel features exclusive to deep branching eukaryotes, suggesting mechanistic differences in the process of telomere synthesis between T. brucei and higher eukaryotic organisms. Therefore, this project: (i) investigates telomerase RNA structure at a single nucleotide resolution using NMR and SHAPE chemistry, (ii) defines key TERT contact sites on TER that are essential for telomerase function in T. brucei using HITS-CLIP technology, and (iii) establishes the functional significance of TR domains by genetic manipulations and telomerase functional assays. Overall, this research will allow significant advances in understanding the mechanistic details of telomerase evolution in protists.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: S-STEM:SCHLR SCI TECH ENG&MATH | Award Amount: 245.37K | Year: 2015

This project is establishing a spiral laboratory framework for a computer engineering curriculum in which the key concepts are revisited at increasing levels of sophistication and interconnection. Instead of treating each course as an isolated topic, the project is developing a sequence of laboratory experiments and projects weaving through the entire curriculum, from freshman engineering to senior capstone design. This approach will help students see the big picture of the discipline and enhance their integration skills to address complex and realistic problems.

The proposed work connects and integrates the individual courses through laboratories that incorporate three types of media: video, audio, and touch sensor. The laboratories are designed to illustrate and reinforce key theoretical concepts in various courses. Their complexities and abstraction levels gradually grow as students progress through the curriculum. Each individual project and its components eventually evolve into a complete set of IP (intellectual property) cores that form customizable I/O subsystems that can be incorporated into any FPGA (field programmable gate array) based computer system. The overall project addresses a serious deficiency - lack of integration skill - in the engineering curriculum. It uses low-cost prototyping boards and parts and can be easily incorporated into existing curricular structures. The improved curriculum will enhance students integration skill, make them aware of the big context, and keep them interested and motivated. The project will be implemented in two institutions in parallel and its effectiveness will be evaluated.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS (CPS) | Award Amount: 799.23K | Year: 2015

The project will produce breakthroughs in the science of human-machine interaction and will produce lasting impacts on exercise machine technologies. The proposed Cyber-Enabled Exercise Machines (CEEMs) adapt to their users, seeking to maximize the effectiveness of exercise while guaranteeing safety. CEEMs measure and process biomechanical variables and generate adjustments to its own resistance, and generate cues to be followed by the exerciser. CEEMs are reconfigurable by software, which permits a wide range of exercises with the same hardware. Two prototype machines will be field-tested with the student-athlete population and used to validate project goals. The prototypes will be a valuable instrument for dissemination and outreach, as well as for student engagement. The outcomes of this research have repercussions beyond athletic conditioning: the same foundations and methodologies can be followed to design machines for rehabilitation, exercise countermeasure devices for astronauts, and custom exercise devices for the elderly and persons with disabilities. Thus, the project has the potential to improve health of society members at various levels.


This research will contribute to the foundations of cyber-physical system science in the following aspects: biomechanical modeling and real-time musculoskeletal state estimation; estimation theory and unscented H-infinity estimation; control theory and human-machine interaction dynamics, and micro-evolutionary optimization for real-time systems. The proposed Cyber-Enabled Exercise Machines (CEEMs) are highly reconfigurable devices which adapt to the user in pursuit of an optimization objective, namely maximal activation of target muscle groups. Machine adaptation occurs through port impedance modulation, and optimal cues are generated for the exerciser to follow. The goals of the project are threefold: i) development of foundational cyber-physical science and technology in the field of human-machine systems; ii) development of new approaches to modeling, design, control and optimization of advanced exercise machines, and iii) application of the above results to develop two custom-built CEEMs: a rowing ergometer and a 2-degree-of-freedom resistance machine.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: AGEP | Award Amount: 239.97K | Year: 2015

Case Western Reserve University, Kent State University, the University of Akron, the University of Toledo, Youngstown State University, Bowling Green University and Cleveland State University will collaborate to create the Northern Ohio Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (NOA-AGEP): A Racially and Ethnically Inclusive Graduate Education Model in Biology, Chemistry and Engineering (BCE). These alliance schools will also partner with Central State University and Tuskegee University. This project was created in response to the NSFs Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP) program solicitation (NSF 14-505) for the AGEP-Transformation (AGEP-T) track. The AGEP-T track targets strategic alliances of institutions and organizations to develop, implement, and study innovative evidence-based models and standards for STEM graduate education, postdoctoral training, and academic STEM career preparation that eliminate or mitigate negative factors and promote positive practices for underrepresented minorities (URMs). The NOA-AGEP project will develop, implement, and study a model to improve URM student participation, preparation, and success in BCE graduate education, and to prepare them for entry into the professoriate

This AGEP-T project will uniquely contribute to foundational knowledge about the recruitment, retention and graduation of doctoral URMs in BCE. The emphasis on inclusive graduate education, an umbrella of supports for graduate students, and extensive diversity training for BCE faculty and staff offers an exceptional opportunity for a regional group of universities with low URM STEM doctoral student enrollment to investigate the promotion of inclusive policies, practices and initiatives. The lessons learned as this project progresses, and the ultimate results from the work, will provide information that will be beneficial to educators, administrators and policymakers, as well as the general public.

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