Cleveland Metroparks

East Cleveland, OH, United States

Cleveland Metroparks

East Cleveland, OH, United States

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News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Hulet Hornbeck Lifetime Service Award: Reese Lukei, Jr.: This award is for an individual that, like Hulet Hornbeck, exemplifies long-standing vision and wisdom in support of trails. Reese Lukei, Jr.’s long and productive career with trails began with his interest and dedication to the outdoors and migratory birds in the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge on Chesapeake Bay in Virginia. Trail Accessibility Award: Hawk Mountain Sanctuary: This award recognizes a project that demonstrates integration of accessibility characteristics into its design and construction. Hawk Mountain Sanctuary is a 2,600-acre natural area in southeastern Pennsylvania that is famous as the world's first refuge for birds of prey. Trail Planning & Design Award, Level One: City of San Jose and Callander Associates: This award recognizes a trail project that demonstrates innovative planning and design techniques while making a positive contribution to the community it serves. San Jose, California has one of the nation’s largest urban trail networks. Over 57 miles of trails are developed and open to the public. Trail Planning & Design Award, Level Two: Greater Yellowstone Trail Concept Plan: This award recognizes a project that demonstrates innovative planning and design techniques while making a positive contribution to the community it serves. (Level Two category – more than $500,000) The Greater Yellowstone Trail Concept Plan seeks to provide residents and visitors alike with a sustainable, healthy, and authentic way to experience the region’s unique landscapes and history in Montana. Trail Partnership Award: Waldo County Trails Coalition: This award is given to a partnership which benefits agencies or services within the field of trail planning, design, or implementation. The Waldo County Trails Coalition is a collaborative project of nine Waldo County organizations working to create a 47-mile year-round recreational footpath stretching from Unity to Belfast, Maine. skiing. Trail Promotion and Education Award: Cleveland Metroparks Trail Ambassador Volunteer Program: This award recognizes innovative and successful strategies for promoting and increasing trail use and understanding. Cleveland Metroparks in Ohio serves over 44 million visitors annually. The 23,000+ acre park district is open 365 days per year. The park has 300 miles of trails, including all-purpose trails, hiking trails, and bridle paths. Trails for Health Award: Quad City Health Initiative, Be Healthy QC Coalition, and Bi-State Regional Commission: This award recognizes a community’s commitment to improving access to trails and promoting their use and importance for increasing physical activity. The Quad Cities’ trail network is located at the intersection of two national trail systems, the American Discovery Trail and the Mississippi River Trail between. International Planning & Design Award: Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service: This award recognizes an extraordinary trail project that occurred outside the United States, which demonstrates innovative planning and design techniques while making a positive contribution to a specific country or region of the world. On December 23, 2015 a group of 24 walkers from around the world, aged from six to 70, stepped onto a catamaran called The Blade, and launched a brand-new tourism product for Tasmania – the Three Capes Track. State Awards: Outstanding Trail Leaders These awards recognize individuals who have made compelling and significant contributions to the trails movement in their home states. Any area of trail excellence or achievement – advocating, designing, building, using, maintaining, promoting, decorating, adapting technologies for trail use, etc. – could be grounds for receiving this honor. Only one award per State will be made. Steve Newton (Alabama) Steve is a passionate advocate for safety in Off-Highway Vehicle access in Alabama. Governor John Hickenlooper (Colorado) Governor John Hickenlooper has elevated trails to a new level in Colorado. Marcie Moore (Georgia) Marcie is an employee of Gwinnett County Parks & Recreation in Georgia. David Nash (Hawaii) The International Mountain Bike Association chapter, Oahu Mountain Bike Ohana (OMTB), is a nonprofit organization for bicyclists on the Hawaiian island of Oahu. Tom Laws (Idaho) Tom demonstrates a resounding commitment to the bicycle and pedestrian network of southwest Idaho – locally known as the Treasure Valley – home to over 500 miles of trails and pathways, including nearly 50 miles of paved pathway on the Boise River Greenbelt system and 190 miles of trails in the scenic Boise foothills. Paul Arlinghaus (Indiana) Paul has been involved at nearly every level of trail development, including design, construction, and maintenance, on over 100 miles of mountain bike trails in Indiana. Lieutenant Governor Billy Nungesser (Louisiana) Lieutenant Governor Billy Nungesser has been a recreational trails advocate and builder for over a decade. Sally Hausken (Minnesota) Sally Hausken has done what many thought was impossible in a small, rural based community in west central Minnesota. Vince La Plante (Nevada) Vince is an established trail builder having constructed some of the most complex multi-use trail systems in the intermountain west and in Nevada. Nick Ybarra (North Dakota) Nick has been the leading force in saving the legendary Maah Daah Hey trail in western North Dakota. Andrew Bashaw (Ohio) The Buckeye Trail Association builds, maintains, and promotes the use of a 1,400 mile statewide trail. Andrew’s efforts are the glue that brings all aspects of the association together. Ralph Protano (Ohio) In 2012, Ralph was hired by Ohio’s Cleveland Metroparks to start up a new Trails Division. Diana Druga (West Virginia) Diana has lived and worked in the Clarksburg, West Virginia area for nearly 25 years. Tim Malzhan (Wisconsin) Tim is the Field Operations Director with the Ice Age Trail Alliance, the non-profit arm of the Ice Age National Scenic Trail. AMERICAN TRAILS American Trails is pursuing a national infrastructure of trails and greenways that serves a full range of activities. Through education, partnerships, and timely information resources, American Trails promotes the creation, conservation and broad enjoyment of quality trails and greenways that offer places of solace, health, fitness, recreation and transportation for all Americans. The organization supports local, regional, and long-distance trails and greenways, whether in backcountry, rural, or urban areas. American Trails is the only national nonprofit organization working on behalf of all trail types. Visit the world’s largest online resources for trails, greenways, and blueways: http://www.AmericanTrails.org. For more information please visit: 2017 Awards webpage 2017 International Trails Symposium webpage


Korfel C.A.,Wilma H Schiermeier Olentangy River Wetland Research Park | Korfel C.A.,Ohio State University | Mitsch W.J.,Wilma H Schiermeier Olentangy River Wetland Research Park | Hetherington T.E.,Ohio State University | Mack J.J.,Cleveland Metroparks
Restoration Ecology | Year: 2010

This study compared the hydrology, physiochemistry, and amphibian biomass between a complex of created vernal pools and a complex of natural vernal pools in 2007 in central Ohio, United States. Hydrologic connectivity of surface water and groundwater differed between the natural and the created pool complexes. Surface inundation duration for created pools exceeded that of natural pools, although spring water depths were similar. Dissolved oxygen (p= 0.05) and hourly temperature (p= 0.00) were 1.2% and 1.1% higher, respectively, in the created pools, and conductivity was 1.5% higher (p= 0.00) in the natural pools. Amphibian dip net results found no significant difference in biomass between natural and created pools or family (hylid, ranid, and ambystomatid) biomass in both pool types. Amphibian families were evenly represented by both capture methods in the created wetlands; however, the distribution of families was not even in natural pools and the proportion of ranids was four times greater for samples obtained by funnel traps than dip netting. Eleven years after construction, the created vernal pools did not mimic natural pools in surface inundation and groundwater-surface water exchange, dissolved oxygen, and water temperature. The created pools are perched wetlands and are never likely to mimic reference pool hydrology. Dissolved oxygen and temperature differences are likely due to the separation of surface water and groundwater in the created pools. However, the created pools exhibited a higher taxa diversity than the natural pools due to a more even distribution of organisms between the three families. © 2009 Society for Ecological Restoration International.


Hausman C.E.,Cleveland Metroparks | Hausman C.E.,Kent State University | Bertke M.M.,Kent State University | Bertke M.M.,University of Notre Dame | And 2 more authors.
Plant Genetic Resources: Characterisation and Utilisation | Year: 2014

The USA is experiencing a prolific invasion of the wood-boring emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis. Native to Asia, this beetle completes its life cycle on ash trees and results in nearly complete mortality of all infested trees. In the present study, we examined the levels of genetic diversity and differentiation among eight populations of Fraxinus pennsylvanica (green ash) using five polymorphic microsatellite loci. Genetic information was used to design guidelines for the establishment of a seed collection sampling strategy to conserve the genetic diversity of ash trees. We found high levels of genetic diversity, as indicated by the allelic richness, both across the populations (16.4 ± 5.18 alleles per locus) and within them (8.03 ± 1.21 alleles per locus). The expected and observed heterozygosity was also high (0.805 ± 0.38 and 0.908 ± 0.04, respectively), and there was moderate genetic differentiation among the populations (F ST= 0.083) with members of these eight populations grouped into three distinct clusters. We examined the relationship between the number of individuals sampled and the number of alleles captured in a random sample taken from a population of 10,000 individuals. Only sample sizes of 100 individuals captured most of the alleles (average = 78.74 alleles), but only seven of 50 samples effectively captured all the 82 alleles. Smaller samples did not capture all alleles. A probabilistic model was used to determine an optimal sampling strategy, and it was concluded that a collection of 200 seeds from each of five mother trees would have the highest likelihood of capturing all alleles in a population. © 2014 NIAB.


Stapanian M.A.,U.S. Geological Survey | Adams J.V.,U.S. Geological Survey | Fennessy M.S.,Kenyon College | Mack J.,Cleveland Metroparks | Micacchion M.,Midwest Biodiversity Institute
Wetlands | Year: 2013

A persistent question among ecologists and environmental managers is whether constructed wetlands are structurally or functionally equivalent to naturally occurring wetlands. We examined 19 variables collected from 10 constructed and nine natural emergent wetlands in Ohio, USA. Our primary objective was to identify candidate indicators of wetland class (natural or constructed), based on measurements of soil properties and an index of vegetation integrity, that can be used to track the progress of constructed wetlands toward a natural state. The method of nearest shrunken centroids was used to find a subset of variables that would serve as the best classifiers of wetland class, and error rate was calculated using a five-fold cross-validation procedure. The shrunken differences of percent total organic carbon (% TOC) and percent dry weight of the soil exhibited the greatest distances from the overall centroid. Classification based on these two variables yielded a misclassification rate of 11 % based on cross-validation. Our results indicate that % TOC and percent dry weight can be used as candidate indicators of the status of emergent, constructed wetlands in Ohio and for assessing the performance of mitigation. The method of nearest shrunken centroids has excellent potential for further applications in ecology. © 2013 US Government.


Guayasamin J.M.,Technological Amerindian University, Ambato | Krynak T.,Cleveland Metroparks | Krynak K.,Case Western Reserve University | Culebras J.,Technological Amerindian University, Ambato | And 2 more authors.
Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society | Year: 2015

We describe a new frog, Pristimantis mutabilis sp. nov., from the Andes of Ecuador. Individuals of the new species are remarkable for their ability to change skin texture from tuberculate to almost smooth in a few minutes, being the first documented amphibian species to show such dramatic phenotypic plasticity. The new taxon is assigned to the P. myersi group. It differs from other members of its group by body size (adult males 17.2-17.4mm; adult females 20.9-23.2mm), arboreal habitat, and red flash coloration in females. We document three call types for the new species, which differ through their number of notes and amplitude peaks. The three types are pulsed calls that share a dominant frequency of 3186.9-3445.3Hz. Surprisingly, we also document similar skin texture plasticity in species (P.sobetes) from a different species group, suggesting that this ability might be more common than previously thought. The discovery of these variable species poses challenges to amphibian taxonomists and field biologists, who have traditionally used skin texture and presence/absence of tubercles as important discrete traits in diagnosing and identifying species. Reciprocal monophyly and genetic distances also support the validity of the new species, as it has distances of 15.1-16.3% (12S) and 16.4-18.6% (16S) from the most similar species, Pristimantis verecundus. Additionally, each of the two known populations of Pristimantis mutabilis are reciprocally monophyletic and exhibit a high genetic distance between them (5.0-6.5%). This pattern is best explained by the presence of a dry valley (Guayllabamba River) that seems to be acting as a dispersal barrier. © 2015 The Linnean Society of London.


Krynak K.L.,Case Western Reserve University | Oldfield R.G.,Case Western Reserve University | Oldfield R.G.,Sam Houston State University | Dennis P.M.,Case Western Reserve University | And 3 more authors.
Biological Invasions | Year: 2015

Invasions by Asian carps have become a high profile topic due to the threat they pose to native ecosystems and associated economies. One of four primary invasive Asian carp species, Grass Carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella (Cyprinidae), is commonly produced as triploid, sterile, individuals and stocked as a biological control for the suppression of unwanted aquatic vegetation. Illegal sale and transport of diploid fish can result in unwanted fertile populations. Current methods of determining ploidy of an individual require the use of laboratory equipment (Coulter Counter) and are not possible to perform under field conditions. Here we introduce a rapid, inexpensive technique to distinguish diploid fertile versus triploid sterile Grass Carp under field conditions using a compound microscope. We compared blood smears of known diploid and triploid Grass Carp individuals, finding that the frequency of abnormally shaped erythrocyte nuclei (dumbbell or teardrop shaped) is significantly higher in the latter. This difference is accompanied by larger cell and increased nuclear volumes, and it is significantly correlated with Coulter Counter values (the standard measure of ploidy used by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service). Additionally, we field tested our method on a managed, presumably triploid, standing stock of Grass Carp and found that all individuals tested exhibited proportions of abnormal nuclei typical of triploids. Finally, a blinded study was used to confirm diagnostic reliability of our visual assessment of ploidy. Examination of blood smears for abnormally shaped nuclei may become a powerful tool in the management of invasive Grass Carp. © 2015, Springer International Publishing Switzerland.


Dananay K.L.,Case Western Reserve University | Krynak K.L.,Case Western Reserve University | Krynak T.J.,Cleveland Metroparks | Benard M.F.,Case Western Reserve University
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry | Year: 2015

Road salt runoff has potentially large effects on wetland communities, but is typically investigated in short-term laboratory trials. The authors investigated effects of road salt contamination on wood frogs (Rana sylvatica) by combining a field survey with 2 separate experiments. The field survey tested whether wood frog larval traits were associated with road salt contamination in natural wetlands. As conductivity increased, wood frog larvae were less abundant, but those found were larger. In the first experiment of the present study, the authors raised larvae in outdoor artificial ponds under 4 salt concentrations and measured larval vital rates, algal biomass, and zooplankton abundance. Salt significantly increased larval growth, algal biomass, and decreased zooplankton abundance. In the second experiment, the authors raised larvae to metamorphosis in the presence and absence of salt contamination and followed resulting juvenile frogs in terrestrial pens at high and low densities. Exposure to road salt as larvae caused juvenile frogs to have greater mortality in low-density terrestrial environments, possibly because of altered energy allocation, changes in behavior, or reduced immune defenses. The present study suggests that low concentrations of road salt can have positive effects on larval growth yet negative effects on juvenile survival. These results emphasize the importance of testing for effects of contaminants acting through food webs and across multiple life stages as well as the potential for population-level consequences in natural environments. © 2015 SETAC.


PubMed | Cleveland Metroparks and Case Western Reserve University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Environmental toxicology and chemistry | Year: 2015

Road salt runoff has potentially large effects on wetland communities, but is typically investigated in short-term laboratory trials. The authors investigated effects of road salt contamination on wood frogs (Rana sylvatica) by combining a field survey with 2 separate experiments. The field survey tested whether wood frog larval traits were associated with road salt contamination in natural wetlands. As conductivity increased, wood frog larvae were less abundant, but those found were larger. In the first experiment of the present study, the authors raised larvae in outdoor artificial ponds under 4 salt concentrations and measured larval vital rates, algal biomass, and zooplankton abundance. Salt significantly increased larval growth, algal biomass, and decreased zooplankton abundance. In the second experiment, the authors raised larvae to metamorphosis in the presence and absence of salt contamination and followed resulting juvenile frogs in terrestrial pens at high and low densities. Exposure to road salt as larvae caused juvenile frogs to have greater mortality in low-density terrestrial environments, possibly because of altered energy allocation, changes in behavior, or reduced immune defenses. The present study suggests that low concentrations of road salt can have positive effects on larval growth yet negative effects on juvenile survival. These results emphasize the importance of testing for effects of contaminants acting through food webs and across multiple life stages as well as the potential for population-level consequences in natural environments.


Stapanian M.A.,U.S. Geological Survey | MacK J.,Cleveland Metroparks | Adams J.V.,U.S. Geological Survey | Gara B.,U.S. Environmental Protection Agency | Micacchion M.,Midwest Biodiversity Institute
Ecological Indicators | Year: 2013

Indices of biological integrity of wetlands based on vascular plants (VIBIs) have been developed in many areas in the USA. Knowledge of the best predictors of VIBIs would enable management agencies to make better decisions regarding mitigation site selection and performance monitoring criteria. We use a novel statistical technique to develop predictive models for an established index of wetland vegetation integrity (Ohio VIBI), using as independent variables 20 indices and metrics of habitat quality, wetland disturbance, and buffer area land use from 149 wetlands in Ohio, USA. For emergent and forest wetlands, predictive models explained 61% and 54% of the variability, respectively, in Ohio VIBI scores. In both cases the most important predictor of Ohio VIBI score was a metric that assessed habitat alteration and development in the wetland. Of secondary importance as a predictor was a metric that assessed microtopography, interspersion, and quality of vegetation communities in the wetland. Metrics and indices assessing disturbance and land use of the buffer area were generally poor predictors of Ohio VIBI scores. Our results suggest that vegetation integrity of emergent and forest wetlands could be most directly enhanced by minimizing substrate and habitat disturbance within the wetland. Such efforts could include reducing or eliminating any practices that disturb the soil profile, such as nutrient enrichment from adjacent farm land, mowing, grazing, or cutting or removing woody plants. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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