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Pomona, CA, United States

Fung K.Y.,Hong Kong University of Science and Technology | Wibowo C.,ClearWaterBay Technology Inc.
Current Opinion in Chemical Engineering | Year: 2013

Process synthesis, modeling, and experiments are the major components in designing industrial wastewater treatment plants. As industrial wastewater contains process-specific pollutants and is highly varied in nature, limited information is available in selecting the best treatment unit for a given industrial wastewater by heuristics. Experiments can complement the heuristics-based flowsheet development by determining the best treatment unit for the industrial wastewater and obtaining model parameters for a more reliable process simulation. This finally leads to a high performance and cost effective industrial wastewater treatment plant. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Lau Y.T.,Hong Kong University of Science and Technology | Ng K.M.,Hong Kong University of Science and Technology | Lau D.T.W.,Hong Kong University of Science and Technology | Wibowo C.,ClearWaterBay Technology Inc.
AIChE Journal | Year: 2013

A procedure for herbal extraction has been developed for producing a Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) with consistent quality regardless of the source of the herb. The quality assurance (QA) procedure is based on a model which accounts for the physicochemical phenomena governing herbal extraction. With this model and the companion experiments for determining the relevant model parameters, the amount of each herb needed from different herb quality classes to produce a CHM decoction with consistent quality can be determined. The procedure was illustrated by the extraction of Danshen and that of Gegen. For both examples, the experimental chemical marker concentrations fell within±10% of the specified concentrations by using the amount of herb from each herb class as predicted. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers. Source


Cai G.,Hong Kong University of Science and Technology | Fung K.Y.,Hong Kong University of Science and Technology | Ng K.M.,Hong Kong University of Science and Technology | Wibowo C.,ClearWaterBay Technology Inc.
Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research | Year: 2014

Recycling of spent lithium ion batteries (LIBs) has received increasing attention in recent years, because of the increasing usage of LIBs in electronic products and the potential leakage of heavy metals to the soil when they are disposed to the landfills. Chemical precipitation has been widely applied in the recycling process of spent LIBs. However, most processes are developed based on trial and error, leading to the possibility of recovering the wrong product in the precipitation process or excess usage of chemicals. Solid-liquid equilibrium (SLE) phase behavior governs the products to be recovered from the precipitation process and can be used to guide and optimize the process. Case studies on the recycling of LiFePO4 and LiCoxMn1-xO2 have been studied in this paper to demonstrate how the SLE phase behavior can be used to design the recovery process. Both case studies illustrate that pure metal salts can be recovered from the precipitation process with high recovery. The case studies also demonstrate how the SLE phase behavior helps to rationalize the separation process developed by previous researchers based on trial and error. The SLE phase behavior can be utilized to determine the optimal operating conditions such as the amount of precipitant to be added to the system. With the insights provided from the SLE phase behavior, new process alternatives can be generated. Process alternatives can be compared with the base case process to determine the optimal process for recycling metal salts from spent LIBs. © 2014 American Chemical Society. Source


Wibowo C.,ClearWaterBay Technology Inc.
Chemical Engineering Progress | Year: 2014

Crystallization is one of the few separation methods that can yield high-purity products. Because it is a relatively simple operation and it can be performed at large scale, it is often an attractive and promising option, especially for high-molecular-weight chemicals that normally exist as solids at atmospheric conditions. Downstream processing units, such as filtration, washing, and drying, often cost more than the crystallizer itself and can be sources of serious operational problems, so they, too, must be properly designed in conjunction with the crystallizer. Finally, process systems engineering (PSE) techniques, such as optimization, control, and scheduling are employed to integrate the various aspects of the design and achieve the best overall process performance. The simplest case is a binary system, such as salt and water. The solubility of salt in water varies with temperature, which makes it possible to crystallize the salt from its solution by cooling or heating. Source


Cheng Y.S.,Hong Kong University of Science and Technology | Lam K.W.,Hong Kong University of Science and Technology | Ng K.M.,Hong Kong University of Science and Technology | Wibowo C.,ClearWaterBay Technology Inc.
AIChE Journal | Year: 2010

A workflow consisting of experiments, modeling, and synthesis is presented for managing the impurity content in the product crystals of a crystallization process taking into consideration the entire train of crystallization and downstream processing steps. Experiments on solid-liquid equilibrium, impurity inclusion, washing, and deliquoring are designed in such a way that the experimental data or the model parameters derived from these data can be readily used for process design. Guidelines for experimental design and tradeoffs in process synthesis are discussed. The workflow is illustrated using the purification of Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) as a case study. © 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers. Source

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