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Clear Technology | Date: 2016-10-21

A method of providing a condition report for a vehicle using a mobile device including a display includes constructing a plurality of condition report sections using a condition report application database residing in a cloud based server service and infrastructure to process requests from the mobile device including: capturing data, on the mobile device, for constructing at least one condition report section of the plurality of condition report sections; and accessing, from the mobile device, a condition report document database and/or a condition report images database residing in the cloud based server service and infrastructure for constructing and storing the plurality of condition report sections. The method includes providing user input indicative that the plurality of condition report sections have been completed, and providing user input indicative of a decision to publish the completed condition report sections as the condition report for the vehicle. The published condition report is viewable by a party by an Internet accessible web browsing device.


Protein phosphorylation is one type of posttranslational modification, which regulates a large number of cellular processes in plant cells. As an emerging powerful biotechnology that integrates all aspects of advantages from mass spectrometry, bioinformatics, and genomics, phosphoproteomics offers us an unprecedented high-throughput methodology with high sensitivity and dashing speed in identifying a large complement of phosphoproteins from plant cells within a relatively short period of time. Needless to say, phosphoproteomics has become an integral portion of life sciences, which penetrates various research disciplines of biology, agriculture, and forestry and irreversibly changes the way by which plant scientists study biological problems.Because phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of protein is dynamic in cells and the amount of phosphoproteins is low, the preservation of a phosphor group onto phosphosite throughout protein purification as well as enrichment of these phosphoproteins during purification has become a serious technical issue. To overcome difficulties commonly associated with phosphoprotein isolation, phosphopeptides' enrichment, and mass spectrometry analysis, we have developed a urea-based phosphoprotein purification protocol for plants, which instantly denatures plant proteins once the total cell content comes into contact with the UEB solution. To measure the alteration of phosphorylation on a phosphosite using mass spectrometer, an in vivo 15N metabolic labeling method (SILIA, i.e., stable isotope labeling in Arabidopsis) has been developed and applied for Arabidopsis differential phosphoproteomics. Thus far, hundreds of signaling-specific phosphoproteins have been identified using both label-free and 15N-labeled differential phosphoproteomic approach. The phosphoproteomics has allowed us to identify a number of signaling components mediating plant cell signaling in Arabidopsis. It is envisaged that a huge number of phosphosites will continue to be uncovered from phosphoproteomics in the near future, which will become instrumental for the development of plant phosphor-relay networks and molecular systems biology. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Peng C.,Tongji University | Chen B.,Tongji University | Qin Y.,Tongji University | Yang S.,Clear Technology | And 4 more authors.
ACS Nano | Year: 2012

In this paper, we report a facile ultrasonic method to synthesize well-dispersed CoO quantum dots (3-8 nm) on graphene nanosheets at room temperature by employing Co 4(CO) 12 as cobalt precursor. The prepared CoO/graphene composites displayed high performance as an anode material for lithium-ion battery, such as high reversible lithium storage capacity (1592 mAh g -1 after 50 cycles), high Coulombic efficiency (over 95%), excellent cycling stability, and high rate capability (1008 mAh g -1 with a total retention of 77.6% after 50 cycles at a current density of 1000 mA g -1, dramatically increased from the initial 50 mA g -1). The extraordinary performance arises from the structure advantages of the composites: the nanosized CoO quantum dots with high dispersity on conductive graphene substrates supply not only large quantity of accessible active sites for lithium-ion insertion but also good conductivity and short diffusion length for lithium ions, which are beneficial for high capacity and rate capability. Meanwhile, the isolated CoO quantum dots anchored tightly on the graphene nanosheets can effectively circumvent the volume expansion/contraction associated with lithium insertion/extraction during discharge/charge processes, which is good for high capacity as well as cycling stability. Moreover, regarding the anomalous behavior of capacity increase with cycles (activation effect) observed, we proposed a tentative hypothesis stressing the competition between the conductivity increase and the amorphorization of the composite electrodes during cycling in determining the trends of the capacity, in the hope to gain a fuller understanding of the inner working of the novel nanostructured electrode-based lithium-ion batteries. © 2012 American Chemical Society.


Patent
Clear Technology | Date: 2011-03-09

An intelligent gas flow sensor probe which outputs a state signal indicating whether there is forced gas flow present within a conduit or whether there is no gas flow. The intelligent gas flow sensor probe includes a heated thermistor and a reference thermistor functionally coupled to a microcontroller. The heated thermistor is continuously heated at a constant rate to a temperature above an ambient temperature within the conduit and outputs a signal responsive to a change in temperature induced by gas flow incident thereupon. Gas flow within the conduit causes heat to be transferred from the heated thermistor to the gas flowing over and/or around the heated thermistor. The reference thermistor is thermally insulated from the heated thermistor and outputs a reference signal responsive to an ambient temperature of the gas within the conduit. The reference thermistor is used to differentiate between forced gas flow and ambient gas flow based on historically obtained temperature data values because flow state determinations are based on real time data which are independent of component tolerances.


Patent
Clear Technology | Date: 2010-08-25

A light strip includes a conductive plate (12) including at least two first conductive strips (11), at least one column second conductive strips (12); first electric conductors (4) including light sources soldered at said distance between said second conductive strips (12), second electric conductors (5) soldered between said first conductive strips (11) and said second conductive strips (12) the light strip of the present invention not only has simple structures, but also has good stability.


Patent
Clear Technology | Date: 2014-05-17

This present invention provides an interface at the time of a transaction that communicates with at least one database that contains information regarding the consumers available payment options. The system then compares the characteristics with various factors regarding the retailer or purchase to match the most suitable payment option with the transaction, and provides that information to the consumer or retailer.


Patent
Clear Technology | Date: 2014-11-20

A method of providing a condition report for a vehicle using a mobile device including a display includes constructing a plurality of condition report sections using a condition report application database residing in a cloud based server service and infrastructure to process requests from the mobile device including: capturing data, on the mobile device, for constructing at least one condition report section of the plurality of condition report sections; and accessing, from the mobile device, a condition report document database and/or a condition report images database residing in the cloud based server service and infrastructure for constructing and storing the plurality of condition report sections. The method includes providing user input indicative that the plurality of condition report sections have been completed, and providing user input indicative of a decision to publish the completed condition report sections as the condition report for the vehicle. The published condition report is viewable by a party by an Internet accessible web browsing device.


The disclosure is directed to an aqueous composition comprising a waterborne polymer, a non-ionic surfactant, a levelling component, an IR absorber, and at least one UV absorber.


News Article | March 29, 2012
Site: www.patentlyapple.com

Apple has invented a killer 3D imaging camera that will apply to both still photography and video. The new cameras in development will utilize new depth-detection sensors such as LIDAR, RADAR and Laser that will create stereo disparity maps in creating 3D imagery. Additionally, the cameras will use advanced chrominance and luminance Sensors for superior color accuracy. And if that wasn't enough, the new cameras will not only include facial recognition but also facial gesturing recognition. Intel discussed the coming 3D revolution back in 2010 and it appears that Apple wants to be one of the first to introduce this killer 3D camera. While others may have beaten Apple to market first, the technology described in today's invention will definitely provide iOS devices with the ability to view killer 3D images that could only be appreciated on Apple's " Resolutionary " Retina Display. Apple's resolutionary experience has only begun. With the ability to view stunning 3D imagery, photos and videos on our new iPad displays, the resolutionary experience is only going pop our brains even further. Existing three-dimensional image capture devices, such as digital cameras and video recorders, can derive limited three-dimensional visual information for objects located within a captured area. For example, some imaging devices can extract approximate depth information relating to objects located within the captured area, but are incapable of obtaining detailed geometric information relating to the surfaces of these objects. Such sensors may be able to approximate the distances of objects within the captured area, but cannot accurately reproduce the three-dimensional shape of the objects. Alternatively other imaging devices can obtain and reproduce surface detail information for objects within the captured area, but are incapable of extracting depth information. Accordingly, these sensors may be incapable of differentiating between a small object positioned close to the sensor and a large object positioned far away from the sensor. Apple's invention relates to systems, apparatuses and methods for capturing a three-dimensional image using one or more dedicated cameras. According to Apple, one embodiment may take the form of a three-dimensional camera configured to capture at least one image including one or more objects, comprising: a first sensor for capturing a polarized image, the first sensor including a camera and a polarized filter associated with the first camera; a second sensor for capturing a first non-polarized image; a third sensor for capturing a second non-polarized image; and at least one processing module for deriving depth information for the one or more objects utilizing at least the first non-polarized image and the second non-polarized image, the processing module further operative to combine the polarized image, the first non-polarized image, and the second non-polarized image to form a composite three-dimensional image. Another embodiment may take the form of three-dimensional imaging apparatus configured to capture at least one image including one or more objects, comprising: a first sensor for capturing a polarized chrominance image and determining surface information for the one or more objects, the first sensor including a color imaging device and a polarized filter associated with the color imaging device; a second sensor for capturing a first luminance image; a third sensor for capturing a second luminance image; and at least one processing module for deriving depth information for the one or more objects utilizing at least the first luminance image and the second luminance image and combining the polarized chrominance image, the first luminance image, and the second luminance image to form a composite three-dimensional image utilizing the surface information and the depth information. Still another embodiment may take the form of a method for capturing at least one image of an object, comprising: capturing a polarized image of the object; capturing a first non-polarized image of the object; capturing a second non-polarized image of the object; deriving depth information for the object from at least the first non-polarized image and the second non-polarized image; determining a plurality of surface normals for the object, the plurality of surface normals derived from the polarized image; and creating a three-dimensional image from the depth information and the plurality of surface normals. Sample image sensing devices include charge-coupled device (CCD) sensors, complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor sensors, infrared sensors, light detection and ranging sensors, and the like. Further, the image sensing devices may be sensitive to a range of colors and/or luminances, and may employ various color separation mechanisms such as Bayer arrays, Foveon X3 configurations, multiple CCD devices, dichroic prisms and the like. Devices that will use the new 3D Capturing Technology Apple states that in some embodiments, the image sensing device may be configured to convert or facilitate converting the captured image into digital image data. The image sensing device may be hosted in various electronic devices including, but not limited to, digital cameras, personal computers, personal digital assistants (PDAs), mobile telephones, a standalone camera, or any other devices that can be configured to process image data. Apple's patent FIG. 1A below is a functional block diagram that illustrates certain components of one embodiment of a three-dimensional camera. As shown in FIG. 1A above, the three-dimensional imaging apparatus/camera 100 may include a first imaging device 102, a second imaging device 104, and an image processing module 106. The first imaging device 102 may include a first imaging device and the second imaging device 104 may include a second imaging device and a polarizing filter 108 associated with the second imaging device. The fields of view of the first and second imaging devices 112 and 114 noted above may be offset so that the received images are slightly different. For example, the field of view 112 of the first imaging device 102 may be vertically, diagonally, or horizontally offset from the second imaging device 104, or may be closer or further away from a reference plane or point. Offsetting the fields of view of the first and second imaging devices 112 and 114 may provide data useful for generating stereo disparity maps, as well as extracting depth information. Apple states that the first imaging device 102 noted in FIG. 1A above may be configured to derive an approximate relative distance of an object 110 by measuring properties of electromagnetic waves as they are reflected off or scattered by the object and captured by the first imaging device. In one embodiment, the first imaging device may be a Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) sensor. The LIDAR sensor may emit laser pulses that are reflected off of the surfaces of objects in the image and detect the reflected signal. The LIDAR sensor may then calculate the distance of an object from the sensor by measuring the time delay between transmission of a laser pulse and the detection of the reflected signal. Other embodiments may utilize other types of depth-detection techniques, such as infrared reflection, RADAR, laser detection and ranging, and the like. Apple invention also touches on the fact that their 3D capturing camera will utilize microlenses that overly subfilters that focus on polarized light. The microlenses can be formed from any suitable material for transmitting and diffusing light through the light guide, including plastic, acrylic, silica, glass, and so on and so forth. Additionally, the light guide may include combinations of reflective material, highly transparent material, light absorbing material, opaque material, metallic material, optic material, and/or any other functional material to provide extra modification of optical performance. In one embodiment, the microlenses may be convex and have a substantially rounded configuration. Other embodiments may have different configurations. For example, in one embodiment, the microlenses may have a conical configuration, in which the top end of each microlens is pointed. In other embodiments, the microlenses may define truncated cones, in which the tops of the microlenses form a substantially flat surface. Additionally, in some embodiments, the microlenses may be concave surfaces, rather than convex. As is known, the microlenses may be formed using a variety of techniques, including laser-cutting techniques, and/or micro-machining techniques, such as diamond turning. After the microlenses are formed, an electrochemical finishing technique may be used to coat and/or finish the microlenses to increase their longevity and/or enhance or add any desired optical properties. Other essentials noted in the 3D camera design include the use of a first chrominance sensor (202) and a luminance sensor (204). The luminance sensor may be configured to capture a luminance component of incoming light. Additionally, each of the chrominance sensors may be configured to capture color components of incoming light. In one embodiment, the chrominance sensors 202,206 may sense the R (Red), G (Green), and B (Blue) components of an image and process these components to derive chrominance information. Other embodiments may be configured to sense other color components, such as yellow, cyan, magenta, and so on. Further, in some embodiments, two luminance sensors and a single chrominance sensor may be used. That is, certain embodiments may employ a first luminance sensor, a first chrominance sensor and a second luminance sensor, such that a stereo disparity (e.g., stereo depth) map may be generated based on the offsets of the two luminance images. Each luminance sensor captures one of the two luminance images in this embodiment. In another embodiment, the three-dimensional imaging apparatus may be used for recognizing facial gestures. Facial gestures may include, but are not limited to, smiling, grimacing, frowning, winking, and so on and so forth. In one embodiment, this may be accomplished by detecting the orientation of various facial muscles using surface geometry data, such as the mouth, eyes, nose, forehead, cheeks, and so on, and correlating the detected orientations with various gestures. In another embodiment, the three-dimensional imaging apparatus may be used to scan an object, for example, to create a three-dimensional model of the object. This embodiment may be accomplished by taking multiple photographs of the object or video while rotating the object. As the object is rotated, the image sensing device may capture more of the surface geometry and use the geometry to create a three-dimensional model of the object. In another related embodiment, multiple photographs or video may be taken while the image sensing device is moved relative to the object, and used to construct a three-dimensional model of the objects within the captured image(s). For example, a user may take video of a home while walking through the home and the image sensing device could use the calculated depth and surface detail information to create a three-dimensional model of the home. The depth and surface detail information of multiple photographs or video stills may then be matched to construct a seamless composite three-dimensional model that combines the surface detail and depth from each of the photos or video. The coming 3D Revolution was first discussed in our report titled "Intel's CES Keynote 2010, Apple and iLife 3D." The Intel rep stated that it would take 8 to 16 processors to pull off 3D in simple to use consumer applications. Fitting this into a camera would be stunning. Apple's patent application was originally filed in Q3 2011by inventors Brett Bilbrey, Michael Culbert, David Simon, Rich DeVaul, Mushtag Sarwar and David Gere and published today by the US Patent and Trademark Office. Notice: Patently Apple presents a detailed summary of patent applications with associated graphics for journalistic news purposes as each such patent application is revealed by the U.S. Patent & Trade Office. Readers are cautioned that the full text of any patent application should be read in its entirety for full and accurate details. Revelations found in patent applications shouldn't be interpreted as rumor or fast-tracked according to rumor timetables. Apple's patent applications have provided the Mac community with a clear heads-up on some of Apple's greatest product trends including the iPod, iPhone, iPad, iOS cameras, LED displays, iCloud services for iTunes and more. About Comments: Patently Apple reserves the right to post, dismiss or edit comments. Check out Our Latest Report on Patent Bolt Titled: Here are a Few Great Sites Covering our Original Report iPhone Devar Arabic, Powned Amsterdam, Wiki Jailbreak, Capital Romania, iPhone 5 news, 3D TV Watcher UK, u Switch UK, Trusted Reviews UK, The Complex, O'Grady's PowerPage, Golem Germany, Crazy Engineers, PCtipp Switzerland, ilove Apple Arabic, Xatakafoto Spanish, Futplus Portuguese, CRN Australia, LiDAR News, Ruforator Russia, Japan.Internet, Conecti Mexico, Webmasterpoint Italy, slashCAM Germany, and more. Note: The sites that we link to above offer you an avenue to make your comments about this report in other languages. These great community sites also provide our guests with varying takes on Apple's latest invention. Whether they're pro or con, you may find them to be interesting, fun or feisty. If you have the time, join in!


News Article | March 6, 2012
Site: www.patentlyapple.com

In May of 2010 we were surprised to see Apple's first iWallet patent officially surface . In that year we witnessed a steady stream of Near Field Communication based patents that kick started the iWallet trend. Ever since that time we've archived these patents under the category of " iWallet-NFC Related ." Today, Apple has been granted a major iWallet patent and it's one that has never been reported on before. Apple's patent reviews credit card transaction rules and shows us that the credit card companies will be sending statements directly to your iTunes account. The iWallet project just became a little more real today, and for many, it can't come soon enough. Who knows, perhaps one day Apple's iWallet will rule the world: the financial world that is. And all Macites said, Amen. Apple has received a major Granted Patent that generally relates to establishing financial transaction rules for controlling a subsidiary financial account and, more particularly, to various systems, methods, and electronic devices configured to provide for the establishment of such rules. Apple states that many payment instruments currently exist and may be used to carry out a financial transaction between two or more parties. For example, payments may be made using cash, credit cards, debit cards, checks, electronic checks, and so forth. In recent years, the growth of electronic commerce may be at least partially attributed to the popularity of credit cards, debit cards, and other non-currency based payment instruments. Thus, while merchants generally continue to accept cash and currency as a method of payment for goods and/or services, most merchants now also accept payments made using credit cards, debit cards, stored-value (e.g., pre-paid) cards, checks, and electronic checks. In particular, online merchants (e.g., those operating "virtual stores" on the Internet or World Wide Web) may rely heavily on the use of credit and debit cards. As we move to a more mobile and fast-paced society, the use of cash or currency is being increasingly replaced by the convenience afforded by payment cards, such as credit, debit, and stored-value cards. Consequently, children are receiving payments cards from their parents and beginning to use payment cards as payment instruments at younger ages. Generally, credit, debit, and stored-value card accounts used by children (e.g., subsidiary account) are linked to or associated with a primary account held by the parent. That is, while the child may be authorized to initiate charges using a payment card, the parent may ultimately be responsible for paying for such charges. Accordingly, it may be desirable to exert some level of control over the types of purchases or transactions a child is permitted to make using a subsidiary account. Summary of the Key Points of this Patent Apple's patent figures associated with Apple's invention generally relate to techniques for implementing and defining financial transaction rules for controlling a subsidiary financial account. By way of example, the relationship between the primary financial account holder and the subsidiary account holder may be that of a parent-child relationship, employer-employee relationship, or the like. The processor-based device may be additionally configured to transmit the financial transaction rules defined by the primary account holder to a designated financial institution that manages the subsidiary account. For instance, where the subsidiary financial account is a credit card account, the financial institution may include an issuing bank and/or a card association. The financial institution may store a record of user preferences associated with the primary and subsidiary financial accounts, and may update these account holder preferences based on the received financial transaction rules. The financial transaction rules may generally limit or restrict transactions or purchases made using the subsidiary financial account. For instance, the financial transaction rules may restrict or limit transactions based upon various criteria including limits or restrictions based upon a transaction amount limit, an aggregate spending limit over a particular time period (e.g., 1 month), a geographic region (e.g., a home zip code), or some combination thereof. Additionally, the financial transaction rules may provide for restrictions or limitations based on merchant categories and specific merchants. The financial transaction rules defined in accordance with the present techniques may set forth certain control actions to be performed with regard to a particular subsidiary account transaction when a transaction rule is violated, such as when a defined a transaction amount limit is exceeded. The control actions may include automatically declining the subsidiary transaction, notifying the primary account holder of the transaction, as well as requiring or requesting authorization from the primary account holder before the subsidiary transaction is approved. Where authorization is required, a financial transaction rule may have defined therein an allotted amount of time in which the financial institution may wait for an instruction to authorize or decline a subsidiary transaction. The authorization times may be defined by the primary account holder using the process-based device. In one embodiment, the different authorization times may be defined based upon whether a pending subsidiary transaction is an in-person transaction (e.g., a cardholder-present purchase made at a physical "brick and mortar" store) or an online transaction (e.g., a cardholder-not-present purchase made from an online retailer via a website). In accordance with a further aspect of the presently disclosed techniques, a primary account holder may define financial transaction rules having multiple tiers or levels of authorization with regard one or more of the transaction criteria discussed above. For example, where a financial transaction rule limits an amount that the subsidiary account holder may spend per transaction (e.g., per purchase), the primary account holder may define multiple transaction limits being associated with different respective control actions. For example, the multiple transaction limits may include a first transaction limit associated with a first control action (e.g., notifying the primary account holder for purchases exceeding the first limit) and a second transaction limit associated with a second control action (e.g., requesting authorization from the primary account holder for purchases exceeding the second limit). Apple's patent FIGS. 7A and 7B show a plurality of screens that may be displayed on a future iPhone with Near Field Communications. It illustrates the configuration of a financial transaction rule for the subsidiary financial account; FIG. 8 is a block diagram illustrating how financial transaction rules for the subsidiary financial account may be updated; FIGS. 9A/C/D show a plurality of screens that may be displayed on an iOS device illustrating the configuration of additional financial transaction rules for the subsidiary financial account; FIGS. 14A and 14B show screens that may be displayed on a Mac for configuring financial transaction rules for a subsidiary financial account. The illustrations show that Apple will use iTunes for credit card statements and records. Apple credits Brandon Casey (San Jose, CA), Gary Wipfler (Los Altos, CA) and Erik Cressall as the inventors of this patent which was originally filed in Q1 2009. Apple's patent is supported by 23 Patent Claims. Update March 20, 2012: Also See Part 2 - Apple's iWallet: The One that will Rule the World Notice: Patently Apple presents only a brief summary of granted patents with associated graphics for journalistic news purposes as each Granted Patent is revealed by the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office. Readers are cautioned that the full text of any Granted Patent should be read in its entirety for full details. About Comments: Patently Apple reserves the right to post, dismiss or edit comments. Check out Our Latest Report on Patent Bolt Titled: Here are a Few Great Sites covering our Original Report Ritholtz - The Big Picture, MacSurfer, StockTradingToGo, NY Times Bits Around the World, Twitter, Facebook, Real Clear Technology, NY Times Blogrunner, Financial Post, Mac Life, Apple Investor News, Google Reader, Macnews, Slashdot, iPhone World Canada, The Mac Observer, MarketWatch,Payment News, Techmeme, 9to5 Mac, iPhoneItalia Italy, Applesfera Spanish,  iClarified, NFC World, iDownloadBlog, BGR, WebProNews, Aberto ate de Madrugada Portugal, Geek.com, App Advice, Excite Japan, Luca De Biase Italy, AppleInsider, CNET, MacDailyNews, International Business Times, phoneArena, GiveMeMind,  Macerkopf Germany, 20Minutos Spain, AutomatiseringGids Netherlands, New Mobile Life Chinese, Edible Apple, ZDNet Australia, Gazeta Poland, GeekSailor, Law Harvard VRM Project, Electronic Transactions Association, PC Magazine, ZDNet UK, iSpazio Italy, iPhone 5 Latest, NFC News, Gizmodo Germany, Yahoo! News,  Digital Trends, The Globe and Mail Canada, Forbes, and more Note: The sites that we link to above offer you an avenue to make your comments about this report in other languages. These great community sites also provide our guests with varying takes on Apple's latest invention. Whether they're pro or con, you may find them to be interesting, fun or feisty. If you have the time, join in!

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