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News Article | May 13, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

RAS AL KHAIMAH, United Arab Emirates--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The American University of Ras Al Khaimah (AURAK) has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the University of Illinois, converting the U.S.-based university into its latest international partner. The agreement, which was initiated by AURAK’s School of Engineering and the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois’ Urbana-Champaign campus, is centered on the establishment of a ‘3+2’ cooperative academic program in which students can earn a bachelor’s degree at AURAK and a master’s degree in Illinois. Pen was put to paper by Prof. Hassan Hamdan Al Alkim and Prof. Mousa Mohsen, AURAK president and dean of the School of Engineering respectively, as well as Robert J. Jones, chancellor of the University of Illinois, Reitumetse Obakeng Mabokela, vice provost for international affairs and global strategies, and Andreas Cangellaris, dean of the University of Illinois’ College of Engineering. Speaking about the agreement, Prof. Mousa Mohsen stated, “For AURAK students, this arrangement offers a unique opportunity to earn a postgraduate degree at a top university in the United States, as well as experiencing all of the transformative impacts associated with immersion in a new culture and environment. I am so excited at the potential of this agreement.” Prof. Al Alkim added, “We are delighted with this agreement, as it seals a very close relationship with an excellent institution in the United States and provides our students with a wonderful opportunity for further study. Opportunities like this can effectively change lives, and at AURAK, we are immensely proud to offer these possibilities to our students through our own top-class education, as well as our network of partners across the world.” At present, AURAK has a range of international partners across Africa, Asia, Europe and North America, opening a wide spectrum of possibilities to students, including exchange and study abroad programs for up to one year, as well as shorter summer sessions. While AURAK students have travelled abroad to study at the likes of Appalachian State University in North Carolina, AURAK also receives a number of students from the United States and Europe each semester, with international students eager to experience the immersive cultural experience on offer in Ras Al Khaimah.


News Article | May 13, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

Initiiert wurde die Vereinbarung von der School of Engineering (Fakultät für Ingenieurwesen) der AURAK und dem Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (Fakultät für Bau- und Umwelttechnik) am Urbana-Champaign-Campus der University of Illinois. Im Mittelpunkt steht die Einrichtung eines 3+2-Hochschulkooperationsprogramms, in dessen Rahmen Studenten einen Bachelor-Abschluss an der AURAK und einen Master-Abschluss in Illinois erwerben können. Unterzeichner der Absichtserklärung waren bei AURAK Prof. Hassan Hamdan Al Alkim als Präsident und Prof. Mousa Mohsen als Dekan der Fakultät für Ingenieurwesen. Auf US-Seite unterzeichneten Robert J. Jones als Kanzler der University of Illinois, Reitumetse Obakeng Mabokela als Vize-Provost für internationale Angelegenheiten und globale Strategien sowie Andreas Cangellaris als Dekan des College of Engineering (Hochschule für Ingenieurwesen) der University of Illinois. Während AURAK-Studenten sich ins Ausland begeben, um beispielsweise an der Appalachian State University in North Carolina Kurse zu belegen, kommen umgekehrt in jedem Semester Studenten aus den USA und Europa an die AURAK, um in die Kultur von Ras Al Khaimah einzutauchen.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"Several years ago, Tencent began more proactively investing in core technologies outside of traditional Internet business areas. We have since been steadily investing in human health related technology companies as part of this broader mandate. As we began to think more about human health, and all threats to human health, we began to think more about ecosystem and planetary health," said David Wallerstein, the Chief Exploration Officer of Tencent, "UC Berkeley has one of the strongest multidisciplinary teams in the natural sciences covering these related areas of any major research university in the world. We've sponsored this event to encourage more awareness and global dialogue regarding the challenges that we all face collectively. We hope that some of the findings or ideas might inspire the next entrepreneur, problem solver, or technologist, but also encourage us all to make better everyday decisions to take the best possible care of our planet, and each other." Peidong Yang, professor of chemistry at UC Berkeley, introduced his research on artificial photosynthesis. Prof. Yang received the MacArthur "Genius" Award in 2015, and was elected as member of National Academy of Science in May last year. It is well known that in nature, plants covert sunlight, water and carbon dioxide into carbohydrates and oxygen through photosynthesis. It is a magical process in which plants covert and store external energy. Peidong Yang and his team developed "artificial photosynthesis" to complete the process to convert energy into carbon-based materials and store them. Ravi Prasher, a scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory who studies energy storage and distribution, said during his speech that the reason chemical energy is popular is that it can be stored and thus more flexible to use. Therefore, the key for scaling renewable energy lies in solving the storage problem. Parsher said that his work currently focuses on research and development of new materials and new equipment for renewable energy. Alexandre Bayen, professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at UC Berkeley, raised an interesting question: "Do the mobile apps we use every day can really help us find the fastest route?" He pointed out that the famous game theory also plays out in the traffic problem. For example, the map apps that are commonly used will lead to people making similar decisions. People will choose the road with no traffic jam, which actually cause unexpected congestion as they all make the same decision. As a result, he pointed out that traffic planning requires a systematic perspective, incorporating people's decision-making and other corresponding factors. Bill Collins, professor of earth and planetary science who led an international team that warned of the dangers of increasing carbon dioxide emissions, said that a large number of studies have shown the accumulation effect of carbon dioxide, but their recent studies have provided more critical information on the correlation between carbon dioxide accumulation and greenhouse effect. For scientists, inspiration sometimes even comes from science fiction. David Sedlak, professor of civil and environmental engineering and director of the Institute for Environmental Science and Engineering said, in science fictions, "stillsuit" that stores and recycles water can meet its users' need for water, and such concept can be expanded to an entire city to form a water recycling system. He said that in fact such concept is already being translated to reality. At Orange County in California for example, water recycling has been practiced for 40 years. Sedlak stressed that he believes water storage is important as it remains the major method for tackling drought, but building on storage, water recycling is more exciting especially for places like drought-ridden California. Sol Hsiang, climate change researcher at UC Berkeley, published a paper with other academics, which identified a more quantitative measurement of climate change impact on the economy. According to their findings, by 2100, the economic losses caused by climate change to Mexico will be as high as 73% of its GDP, and for the US it will be 36% of the GDP. From a global perspective, there is 63% probability that the economic losses will be as high as 10% of the GDP. "These figures are only scenario assumptions based on our models. If we do not take action, perhaps the results will be worse in the real world." Hsiang said on the Forum. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/uc-berkeley-holds-cal-future-forum-discussing-global-challenges-and-solutions-300459067.html


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

Ram Jack Systems Distribution donated $14,000 to ensure full funding of a study being conducted at the University of Nevada, Reno’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. The study aims to evaluate the performance of helical piles in seismic events where soils are susceptible to liquefaction. Deep Foundations Institute (DFI) recently announced their commitment to donate $20,000 for the proposed study submitted by Ramin Motamed, Ph.D., P.E., Assistant Professor at the University of Nevada, Reno. Darin Wills, P.E., director of engineering at Ram Jack as well as a member of the DFI Helical Piles & Tiebacks Committee (HPTC), suggested Ram Jack donate the remaining funds needed for the research. “Our executive committee reviewed Dr. Motamed’s study proposal, and we determined the study is an essential component in HPTC’s overall effort to evaluate the effectiveness of helical piles when they are subjected to seismic forces,” said Willis. “Without fully funding the proposed study, Dr. Motamed would not have the necessary funds to conduct comparative tests with other foundation types such as concrete piers, and our executive committee felt such tests are essential to the overall understanding of how helical piles perform relative to other piling systems,” he added. Willis also serves on a six-member advisory board for the research project, whose members all are donating at least nine hours of engineering services as an in-kind contribution to the project. The study, entitled, “A Pilot Experimental Study on Helical Piles for Underpinning of Shallow Foundations on Soils Susceptible to Liquefaction,” will have two phases. The first will validate results by using 1/5 scale model testing to match the full-scale testing conducted by Amy Cerato, Ph.D., P.E., professor at University of Oklahoma, “Large-Scale Shake Table Test to Quantify Seismic Response of Helical Piles in Dry Sand.” Second, the study will carry out extensive testing on helical piles as well as other pile types to evaluate behavior in liquefied soils.


BERKELEY, Calif., May 17, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Tencent Holdings Limited ("Tencent", SEHK: 00700), a leading provider of internet value-added services in China, supported the Cal Future Forum hosted by the University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) on May 12. The support demonstrated Tencent's pledge to humanity as well as advanced scientific and technological development. Featuring top scientists from UC Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the full-day Cal Future Forum, which took place on campus, provided a primer on the state of the planet, the challenges humanity faces, as well as the solutions developed at Berkeley that are being implemented globally, such as how to verify climate treaties, the future of carbon sequestration, superdikes to deal with rising sea levels, the future of farming, and the connections among biodiversity loss, human health and social conflict. "Several years ago, Tencent began more proactively investing in core technologies outside of traditional Internet business areas. We have since been steadily investing in human health related technology companies as part of this broader mandate. As we began to think more about human health, and all threats to human health, we began to think more about ecosystem and planetary health," said David Wallerstein, the Chief Exploration Officer of Tencent, "UC Berkeley has one of the strongest multidisciplinary teams in the natural sciences covering these related areas of any major research university in the world. We've sponsored this event to encourage more awareness and global dialogue regarding the challenges that we all face collectively. We hope that some of the findings or ideas might inspire the next entrepreneur, problem solver, or technologist, but also encourage us all to make better everyday decisions to take the best possible care of our planet, and each other." Peidong Yang, professor of chemistry at UC Berkeley, introduced his research on artificial photosynthesis. Prof. Yang received the MacArthur "Genius" Award in 2015, and was elected as member of National Academy of Science in May last year. It is well known that in nature, plants covert sunlight, water and carbon dioxide into carbohydrates and oxygen through photosynthesis. It is a magical process in which plants covert and store external energy. Peidong Yang and his team developed "artificial photosynthesis" to complete the process to convert energy into carbon-based materials and store them. Ravi Prasher, a scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory who studies energy storage and distribution, said during his speech that the reason chemical energy is popular is that it can be stored and thus more flexible to use. Therefore, the key for scaling renewable energy lies in solving the storage problem. Parsher said that his work currently focuses on research and development of new materials and new equipment for renewable energy. Alexandre Bayen, professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at UC Berkeley, raised an interesting question: "Do the mobile apps we use every day can really help us find the fastest route?" He pointed out that the famous game theory also plays out in the traffic problem. For example, the map apps that are commonly used will lead to people making similar decisions. People will choose the road with no traffic jam, which actually cause unexpected congestion as they all make the same decision. As a result, he pointed out that traffic planning requires a systematic perspective, incorporating people's decision-making and other corresponding factors. Bill Collins, professor of earth and planetary science who led an international team that warned of the dangers of increasing carbon dioxide emissions, said that a large number of studies have shown the accumulation effect of carbon dioxide, but their recent studies have provided more critical information on the correlation between carbon dioxide accumulation and greenhouse effect. For scientists, inspiration sometimes even comes from science fiction. David Sedlak, professor of civil and environmental engineering and director of the Institute for Environmental Science and Engineering said, in science fictions, "stillsuit" that stores and recycles water can meet its users' need for water, and such concept can be expanded to an entire city to form a water recycling system. He said that in fact such concept is already being translated to reality. At Orange County in California for example, water recycling has been practiced for 40 years. Sedlak stressed that he believes water storage is important as it remains the major method for tackling drought, but building on storage, water recycling is more exciting especially for places like drought-ridden California. Sol Hsiang, climate change researcher at UC Berkeley, published a paper with other academics, which identified a more quantitative measurement of climate change impact on the economy. According to their findings, by 2100, the economic losses caused by climate change to Mexico will be as high as 73% of its GDP, and for the US it will be 36% of the GDP. From a global perspective, there is 63% probability that the economic losses will be as high as 10% of the GDP. "These figures are only scenario assumptions based on our models. If we do not take action, perhaps the results will be worse in the real world." Hsiang said on the Forum. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/uc-berkeley-holds-cal-future-forum-discussing-global-challenges-and-solutions-300459067.html


LeighAnn D'Andrea recalls her Speech & Debate Coach at Sacred Heart as being a profound influence on her life. -- When Sacred Heart alumni LeighAnn D'Andrea received her Air Force Second Lieutenant bars at UMass this past week, it was her former Speech and Debate Coach Daniel Sapir who pinned them on her.D'Andrea was commissioned into the United States Air Force as a 2Lieutenant on May 12, the same day she graduated from the University of Massachusetts with a Bachelor's Degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering. She will delay her entry into the Air Force until 2019, giving her time to complete her Masters' Degree program of studies, which will be in the field of environmental and water resource engineering. She will then join the United States Air Force as a Civil Engineer and will serve for six years.She attributes a lot of her success and career path to her time at Sacred Heart School in Kingston where D'Andrea, a Plymouth resident, graduated in 2013."I joined the Speech and Debate team when I was in the eighth grade," she recalls, saying, "I was very shy and didn't really want to join. But a lot of my friends did join and Dan really encouraged me to join." She said, "He was a great influence on me. He pushed me to take those extra steps, beyond just the Speech & Debate competitions within the department. I entered competitions with the Lions Club, for example, and the VFW. I might not have explored those paths had Dan not encouraged me so strongly."She was, additionally, a Massachusetts State Champion of the Veterans of Foreign Wars-sponsored Voice of Democracy Speech Contest. Students compete in the Voice of Democracy contest by writing and recording a broadcast script on an annual patriotic theme. Her theme was is "Is There Pride in Serving in Our Military?" Local radio station WATD produced the recording for D'Andrea. Her grandfather and mother both served in the Navy."When I look back on my time at Sacred Heart, I remember the science fairs which encouraged me to go into science, and the training I had in Speech & Debate which taught me the communication skills that pointed me in this direction. With all of the encouragement I had from Coach Sapir, I had to ask him to be the one to pin on my bars."Coach Sapir said, "LeighAnn was such an extraordinary student, and someone who we are all so very proud of. What an honor it is for me to be able to participate in this next milestone in her life. She is a wonderful person and a friend to all who know her. We are so pleased for her."Sister Myra Rodgers, President of Sacred Heart School, said, "We congratulate LeighAnn on yet another success in her life. She sets a strong example for all of us and we wish her the very best. We also are pleased to see that our Speech and Debate program has made such an impact on LeighAnn."Sacred Heart School is a private, co-educational Catholic school system, providing educational opportunities for students from preschool through grade 12 in 35 communities throughout southeastern Massachusetts and Cape Cod.  As a sponsored ministry of the Sisters of Divine Providence, Sacred Heart School strives to inspire minds, define character and encourage responsible leadership through a curriculum that prepares students to pursue knowledge throughout their lives.Situated on 100 acres with a present enrollment of 725 students, the Sacred Heart campus encompasses an Early Education Center, Elementary School and High School. The school offers a strong liberal arts curriculum and cutting-edge technology programs in combination with extensive athletic, arts and extra-curricular activities to ensure students a well-rounded education.Founded in 1947, the school has seen many changes since its inception, including the recent construction of a $2 million Science and Innovation Center, upgrades to the Observatory, the addition of a large organic garden, a new robotics program at the kindergarten level and a full complement of beautiful athletic fields and facilities.The campus is in use throughout the year as the site of several vibrant summer programs, including SHIELD (Sacred Heart Interdisciplinary Education Leadership Development), the school's proprietary summer enrichment program and Camp Morningstar, a long-standing recreational camp with sailing, swimming, sports, games and field trips.Sacred Heart is proud of its near 100% college acceptance rate and pleased to offer its students opportunities to participate in internship programs with regional financial and technological firms.Sacred Heart is led by President Sister Myra Rodgers, CDP, who holds Masters degrees in Theology and Music.  Both High School Principal Michael Gill and Early Childhood Center and Elementary School Principal Kim Stoloski hold doctorates in Education.Sacred Heart School welcomes students of all faiths and diverse backgrounds. The school prides itself in a commitment to developing the whole student, offering an independent school atmosphere and top-tier academics. The Sacred Heart campus is located at 251-399 Bishops Highway, Kingston, MA 02364. For additional information about the school, please visit www.sacredheartkingston.com or call 781-585-7511.Photo: Sacred Heart Speech & Debate Coach Dan Sapir (left), is shown with Sacred Heart alumni LeighAnn D'Andrea of Plymouth, at the University of Massachusetts Amherst graduation where she also received her second lieutenant bars.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Transporting methane from gas wellheads to market provides multiple opportunities for this greenhouse gas to leak into the atmosphere. Now, an international team of researchers has taken the first step in converting methane directly to electricity using bacteria, in a way that could be done near the drilling sites. "Currently, we have to ship methane via pipelines," said Thomas K. Wood, holder of the biotechnology endowed chair and professor of chemical engineering, Penn State. "When you ship methane, you release a greenhouse gas. We can't eliminate all the leakage, but we could cut it in half if we didn't ship it via pipe long distances." The researchers' goal is to use microbial fuel cells to convert methane into electricity near the wellheads, eliminating long-distance transport. That goal is still far in the future, but they now have created a bacteria-powered fuel cell that can convert the methane into small amounts of electricity. "People have tried for decades to directly convert methane," said Wood. "But they haven't been able to do it with microbial fuel cells. We've engineered a strain of bacteria that can." Microbial fuel cells convert chemical energy to electrical energy using microorganisms. They can run on most organic material, including wastewater, acetate and brewing waste. Methane, however, causes some problems for microbial fuel cells because, while there are bacteria that consume methane, they live in the depths of the ocean and are not currently culturable in the laboratory. "We know of a bacterium that can produce an energy enzyme that grabs methane," said Wood. "We can't grow them in captivity, but we looked at the DNA and found something from the bottom of the Black Sea and synthesized it." The researchers actually created a consortium of bacteria that produces electricity because each bacterium does its portion of the job. Using synthetic biological approaches, including DNA cloning, the researchers created a bacterium like those in the depths of the Black Sea, but one they can grow in the laboratory. This bacterium uses methane and produces acetate, electrons and the energy enzyme that grabs electrons. The researchers also added a mixture of bacteria found in sludge from an anaerobic digester -- the last step in waste treatment. This sludge contains bacteria that produce compounds that can transport electrons to an electrode, but these bacteria needed to be acclimated to methane to survive in the fuel cell. They report the results of their work today (May 17) in Nature Communications. "We need electron shuttles in this process," said Wood. "Bacteria in sludge act as those shuttles." Once electrons reach an electrode, the flow of electrons produces electricity. To increase the amount of electricity produced, the researchers used a naturally occurring bacterial genus -- Geobacter, which consumes the acetate created by the synthetic bacteria that captures methane to produce electrons. To show that an electron shuttle was necessary, the researchers ran the fuel cell with only the synthetic bacteria and Geobacter. The fuel cell produced no electricity. They added humic acids -- a non-living electron shuttle -- and the fuel cells worked. Bacteria from the sludge are better shuttles than humic acids because they are self-sustaining. The researchers have filed provisional patents on this process. "This process makes a lot of electricity for a microbial fuel cell," said Wood. "However, at this point that amount is 1,000 times less than the electricity produced by a methanol fuel cell." Also working on this project were Michael J. McAnulty, recent doctorate recipient and Venkata Giridhar Poosaria, postdoctoral fellow in chemical engineering; Bruce E. Logan, Evan Pugh Professor in Engineering and the Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering and Kyoung-Yeol Kim, postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; all at Penn State. Ricardo Jasso-Chávez, National Institute of Cardiology, Mexico City, also participated in this research. The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency -- Energy supported this work.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

We all like to keep things clean, and disinfectants help that happen. Unfortunately, one of the most widely used antimicrobial products in use since 1964, triclosan, is also one of the top 10 environmental contaminants in rivers - possibly disrupting the endocrine systems of wildlife and causing toxic effects to their reproduction and development. Now, a new study at the University of Nevada, Reno has found a potential way to reduce the presence of the antimicrobial that is also linked to problems with antibiotic resistance. "The results are promising that we gained better understanding about how triclosan is degraded in the natural environment, and can potentially find a way of removing the contaminant from the environment and in the long term fighting the antibiotic resistance problem," Yu "Frank" Yang, assistant professor of environmental engineering at the University, said. Yang and his team's research on how to reduce the presence of triclosan in the environment was recognized among Emerging Investigator Series by the journal Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, a publication of the Royal Society of Chemistry, and published in the April edition as the inside front-cover story. The article describes how the triclosan, used for things like hand sanitizer, detergents, soaps and paints, can be degraded faster in the environment through a process with a combination of metal-reducing bacterium and natural organic matter. While the nation is phasing out triclosan and finding replacements for the detergents, it's pervasive in the environment and is persistent under certain environmental conditions, Yang said. Because of its persistence and lack of efficient removal processes in most water treatment plants, triclosan has been widely detected in natural waters, soils, sediments and biosolids. "Antibiotic resistance induced by antimicrobial or antibiotic agents is a global problem, if they are not degraded rapidly, then bacteria in the environment get exposure and develop resistant genes and then we can't fight it," Yang said. "If we can completely understand the degradation of antimicrobial agent, we can provide a treatment process in engineered and natural environments." The team tested the matrix of a bacteria strain mixed with the organic material to find the condition that degraded triclosan the fastest. Yang's research found a mixture that reduced the half-life of triclosan to about 10 hours. The overall outcome is determined by the concentration of organic material, microbial activities and the chemistry of the water. "Further study and development are needed, and we would like to fully understand the degradation pathways of emerging organohalides and work out cost-effective removal strategies," Yang said. "Both are challenging tasks." The journal Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts recognized Yang, who is also a member of the College of Science's Global Water Center, for his work and honored him with the distinction of "Emerging Investigator." His paper is part of their 2017 "Emerging Investigator Series" which highlights "the best and brightest early career scientists in the environmental chemical sciences." The journal website explains the "Emerging Investigator" distinction "showcases the high quality research being carried out by researchers in the early stages of their independent careers. It highlights up-and-coming scientists who are internationally recognized for making outstanding contributions to their respective fields." In early April, Yang and his group presented this project and other work in nine presentations at the American Chemical Society's 2017 spring meeting in San Francisco, California. He was also selected in early April by the U.S. National Committee for International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry as a 2017 Young Observer for the organizations General Assembly and Global Congress in São Paulo, Brazil, this July. He has been at the University of Nevada, Reno since September 2013 as an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. He received his doctorate degree from Peking University, China. Since he joined the University, he has secured more than $1 million of federal research grants as principal investigator and Co-PI, and published 14 peer-reviewed manuscripts in top-tier journals in the area. His research is mainly focused on the molecular-level environmental chemistry for critical environmental issues, including carbon cycles and emerging pollutants. The "Dual Role of Organic Matter in the Anaerobic Degradation of Triclosan" study was supported by the University of Nevada, Reno Startup Fund, the Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the China Scholarship Council for the support of Lin Wang, a member of the research team.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

A breakthrough envelope sealing technology that promises to transform the way home and commercial buildings are constructed is entering advanced field trials – the final process toward general market introduction. The new technology, called AeroBarrier™, is being showcased this week at the RESNET Building Performance Conference, where Aeroseal LLC, the sole owner of the technology, is signing up new partners interested in implementing AeroBarrier at new construction job sites. AeroBarrier offers a first-of-its-kind approach to effectively sealing the entire building envelope using an aerosolized sealing system that simultaneously measures and seals building envelope leaks in homes, multi-family apartments or commercial buildings. The computerized AeroBarrier process provides a faster, less expensive way to seal the building envelope and quickly meet even the most stringent building specifications for envelope tightness. The system automatically delivers a final certifiable report at the end of the sealing process, guaranteeing results. As part of the technology’s final analysis before general market introduction, Aeroseal LLC is forming partnerships with builders, developers, architects and contractors interested in using the breakthrough technology to build energy efficient structures. All new partners will have the unique advantage of being among the first to gain expertise in applying the technology and the first to market it to their customer base. “AeroBarrier represents a potential sea change in the way homes and buildings are constructed,” said Mark Modera, Principal Inventor, Sempra Energy chair in energy efficiency, professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Director of the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis. “With AeroBarrier, envelope sealing – a routine that is typically a long, expensive, labor-intensive process -- can now be completed in a matter of hours.” For the past 4 years and under grants provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, a team of researchers at the Western Cooling Efficiency Center (WCEC), University of California, Davis have been working to refine and finalize the development of the AeroBarrier technology, a process that has resulted in new worldwide patents. “AeroBarrier builds upon the aeroseal duct sealing technology that has revolutionized the way we seal duct systems,” said Amit Gupta, president and CEO of Aeroseal LLC. “Now, imagine a similar computerized approach to envelope sealing that, in one-step, can quickly seal all the leaks around windows, drywall, electrical outlets, canned lighting and other areas where leaks affect overall building performance.” The technology has already been field tested under various circumstances including a U.S. Department of Energy building project where AeroBarrier was demonstrated to be highly effective at sealing the envelope of newly constructed multifamily buildings and single family homes across the country. Becoming An AeroBarrier Partner Currently in advanced field trials, the technology is expected to be available on the market in early 2018. For more information about AeroBarrier technology or to request additional information on being an AeroBarrier partner, call (937) 428-9300. About Aeroseal LLC The Aeroseal brand is celebrating 20 years in the market with over 600 dealers offering duct sealing services around the world. Aeroseal LLC bought the patents and rights to Aeroseal technology in 2010 with focus on creating a portfolio of industry-changing energy efficiency solutions. For more information about Aeroseal LLC or aeroseal duct sealing technology, visit http://www.aeroseal.com.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

CAMARILLO, CA, February 17, 2017 /24-7PressRelease/ -- Perla Hernandez Lastra has joined project management firm S.L. Leonard & Associates as a senior project manager. Prior to joining S.L. Leonard & Associates, Hernandez Lastra served as the project manager on the 115,000 square foot Marciano Art Foundation Museum adaptive re-use project in Los Angeles, with a construction value over $21 million. "Perla brings a wealth of building experience to S.L. Leonard & Associates," says Sean Leonard, founder and president. "She's fluent in Spanish, is a LEED Accredited Professional and has spent a good deal of time managing impressive projects. We're happy to have her join our team." In the short time Hernandez Lastra has been a senior project manager at SLL, she has worked on the Casa Pacifica Centers for Children & Families and the Primestor Development's Amara Regional Shopping Center - both in Camarillo. Casa Pacifica Centers for Children & Families is a $21 million project which consists of 46,000 square feet of state-of-the-art clinical, residential and administrative facilities, including two new cottages for housing youth with significant substance abuse issues, a training center and a renovation of the administrative building. The second phase will incorporate a therapeutic activities center and a new clinical building. Primestor Development's Amara Regional Shopping Center is a 44 acre project with 486,000 gross leasable square feet that will house many major national retailers and is scheduled to break ground this summer. During her tenure at a large national general contractor, one of Hernandez Lastra's major projects was the Great Wolf Lodge in Garden Grove, a 14 acre site containing a 132,000 square foot indoor water park, a 14,000 square foot wave pool, one outdoor and three indoor pools, and a nine-story Hotel Tower with 603 keys. The project also has a three-story lobby core building with 30,000 square feet of conference space and 18,000 square feet of retail and dining facilities, including five restaurants. The site houses a five-level design-build parking structure with 950 stalls. Hernandez Lastra is an instructor at UCLA Extension where she has been teaching the Construction Technology class since 2016. She is also a national trainer for SAP and Prolog. She taught Engineering Practices and Procedures, Field Operations, Technology, and Logistics at Turner's School of Construction Management for Minority/Woman/Disadvantaged Businesses from 2010 - 2016. She is a LEED Accredited Professional and is OSHA 30-hour certified, as well as CPR & First Aid Certified. Additionally, Hernandez Lastra is a member of the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, Engineers for a Sustainable World, Social Economic Environmental Design, and Cornell Society of Engineers. Hernandez Lastra holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Cornell University and a Master of Engineering Management degree, also from Cornell University. S.L. Leonard & Associates is a comprehensive real estate development and project management firm based in Camarillo with a second office in Torrance. The firm has worked on numerous high-profile projects, including the Camarillo Public Library, the California Endowment's Headquarters and Conference Center, the City of Hope Helford Clinical Research Replacement Hospital, the mixed-use Working Artists Ventura development, the Museum of Ventura County expansion, Charles Drew University's Life Sciences and Nursing Education building and multiple affordable housing projects totaling more than 2,000 units. Prior to starting the firm, Leonard was senior vice president of project management for the Walt Disney Concert Hall. For more information, call (805) 445-4668 or visit http://www.slleonard.com.

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