College Place, United States
College Place, United States

Time filter

Source Type

The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Israel K. Brown Brantuoh, DO, OB/GYN Physician, to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. He is a highly trained and qualified OB/GYN physician with a vast expertise in all facets of his work. Dr. Brown Brantuoh has been in practice for more than six years. He has worked in the cities of Fresno and Merced, California, and as of July 2017 will be serving patients in his private practice, Pineridge Obstetrix & Gynecology Inc. in the Clovis-Fresno Municipality area. Dr. Brown Brantuoh graduated with his Doctorate of Osteopathic Medicine at Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in 2006. He then went on to complete his internship at The Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, followed by his residency at Wyckoff Heights Medical Center in Brooklyn, New York. Dr. Brown Brantuoh is certified by the American Osteopathic Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and keeps up to date with the latest advances in his field through his professional memberships with the American Osteopathic Association and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Dr. Brown Brantuoh attributes his success to his passion for women’s health, and when he is not assisting patients, dedicates his spare time to hiking, tennis, soccer, watching movies, and musicals. Learn more about Dr. Brown Brantuoh by reading his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit:http://www.findatopdoc.com


Dr. John A. Francis Recognized as a Professional of the Year by Strathmore's Who's Who Worldwide Publication Lees Summit, MO, May 12, 2017 --( About Dr. John A. Francis Dr. Francis is the President and Medical Director of Kansas City Psychiatric & Psychological Services, LLC. KCPPS is a multidisciplinary mental health facility providing an intense outpatient mental health program in Lees Summit, Missouri. With 14 years experience, he oversees the practice and teaches medical students. Dr. Francis provides psychiatric treatment to children, adolescents, and adults. He has specialized training and expertise in treating PTSD, OCD, and severe persistent mental illness of many varieties. He is Board Certified in Psychiatry and affiliated with the American Psychiatric Association. Since starting in private practice, Dr. Francis has endeavored to make patient care effectual, practical and affordable. In 2007, along with his therapist partner, he formed KCPPS which has been a regional leader in innovative treatments and a leader in implementing contemporary and cost effective treatment models. Their Intensive Outpatient Programs have, since their inception, utilized a “therapy first” model, highlighting the paramount importance of the therapist in the patient’s overall treatment. Their IOP modules address Dual Diagnosis, Adolescents, Women’s Issues, and Adult General Psychopathology Treatment Groups. Their outcomes-based programs are internationally certified through the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF), and are preferred programs for many local insurance companies. Because they are not a hospital-based program, they provide care at the Intensive Outpatient level of care at half the cost of hospital-based programs. In April 2011, KCPPS obtained their first Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) device, the first in Kansas City, and in the state of Missouri. Along with treating depression, they have pioneered the utilization of the device in the region for experimental use in treatment of anxiety, psychosis, and migraine headache. Furthermore, their facility has been the driving force behind the acceptance of TMS by regional insurance companies as a covered treatment, under most plans. Future projects for KCPPS include the creation of a day treatment program for PTSD which seeks to utilize exercise, EMDR, Bio-Feedback, TMS, relaxation training, and process groups to address civilian and military PTSD. Secondly, they plan to create a diabetes education and treatment module which utilizes the current American Diabetes Association treatment guidelines on multidisciplinary and psychosocial treatment of diabetes. Lastly, they are developing a novel approach to telemedicine. Born on March 25, 1973 in South Dakota, Dr. Francis obtained a D.O. from Kansas City University of Medicine in 2000. In his spare time he enjoys skiing and soccer. "Love is a medicine for the sickness of the world; a prescription often given, too rarely taken."-Dr. Karl Menninger For further information, contact About Strathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide Strathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide highlights the professional lives of individuals from every significant field or industry including business, medicine, law, education, art, government and entertainment. Strathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide is both an online and hard cover publication where we provide our members’ current and pertinent business information. It is also a biographical information source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms throughout the world. Our goal is to ensure that our members receive all of the networking, exposure and recognition capabilities to potentially increase their business. Lees Summit, MO, May 12, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Dr. John A. Francis of Lees Summit, Missouri has been recognized as a Professional Of The Year for 2017 by Strathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide for his outstanding contributions and achievements in the field of healthcare.About Dr. John A. FrancisDr. Francis is the President and Medical Director of Kansas City Psychiatric & Psychological Services, LLC. KCPPS is a multidisciplinary mental health facility providing an intense outpatient mental health program in Lees Summit, Missouri. With 14 years experience, he oversees the practice and teaches medical students. Dr. Francis provides psychiatric treatment to children, adolescents, and adults. He has specialized training and expertise in treating PTSD, OCD, and severe persistent mental illness of many varieties. He is Board Certified in Psychiatry and affiliated with the American Psychiatric Association.Since starting in private practice, Dr. Francis has endeavored to make patient care effectual, practical and affordable. In 2007, along with his therapist partner, he formed KCPPS which has been a regional leader in innovative treatments and a leader in implementing contemporary and cost effective treatment models. Their Intensive Outpatient Programs have, since their inception, utilized a “therapy first” model, highlighting the paramount importance of the therapist in the patient’s overall treatment. Their IOP modules address Dual Diagnosis, Adolescents, Women’s Issues, and Adult General Psychopathology Treatment Groups. Their outcomes-based programs are internationally certified through the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF), and are preferred programs for many local insurance companies. Because they are not a hospital-based program, they provide care at the Intensive Outpatient level of care at half the cost of hospital-based programs. In April 2011, KCPPS obtained their first Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) device, the first in Kansas City, and in the state of Missouri. Along with treating depression, they have pioneered the utilization of the device in the region for experimental use in treatment of anxiety, psychosis, and migraine headache. Furthermore, their facility has been the driving force behind the acceptance of TMS by regional insurance companies as a covered treatment, under most plans.Future projects for KCPPS include the creation of a day treatment program for PTSD which seeks to utilize exercise, EMDR, Bio-Feedback, TMS, relaxation training, and process groups to address civilian and military PTSD. Secondly, they plan to create a diabetes education and treatment module which utilizes the current American Diabetes Association treatment guidelines on multidisciplinary and psychosocial treatment of diabetes. Lastly, they are developing a novel approach to telemedicine.Born on March 25, 1973 in South Dakota, Dr. Francis obtained a D.O. from Kansas City University of Medicine in 2000. In his spare time he enjoys skiing and soccer."Love is a medicine for the sickness of the world; a prescription often given, too rarely taken."-Dr. Karl MenningerFor further information, contact www.kcpps.org About Strathmore’s Who’s Who WorldwideStrathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide highlights the professional lives of individuals from every significant field or industry including business, medicine, law, education, art, government and entertainment. Strathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide is both an online and hard cover publication where we provide our members’ current and pertinent business information. It is also a biographical information source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms throughout the world. Our goal is to ensure that our members receive all of the networking, exposure and recognition capabilities to potentially increase their business. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Strathmore Worldwide


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

When Kyle Busch graduates from Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences (KCU) on Saturday, May 20, his name will already appear on two major research studies that could impact the health of young athletes everywhere. As a medical student Busch has been working with Dr. Matt Daggett, KCU alumnus and an orthopedic surgeon, alongside an international team trying to discover why girls involved in pivot-shifting sports suffer injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) at a rate far faster than their male counterparts. They partnered with Dr. Camilo Helito of Sau Paulo Brazil and gained unprecedented access to clinical samples. One of the studies where Busch assisted appeared in the Orthopedic Journal of Sports Medicine and discovered that a supportive anterolateral ligament (ALL) is half as thick in females as males. More force going through that supporting ligament leaves girls much more vulnerable to the dreaded ACL tear. The implications of these findings are important, and an additional study published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine that Busch and Daggett collaborated on shows a surgical technique that reconstructs the ALL and the ACL. This combined reconstruction was found to reduce the rate of re-injury to the ACL by over half and also increase an athlete’s chance of returning to play compared to traditional ACL reconstruction alone. “It’s been a fun, dynamic project to be part of,” said Busch. “We’re not only helping young athletes return to play, we are giving hope to adults who would like to return to a sport they love even later in life.” Busch, from Decatur, Illinois, became interested in orthopedic medicine after a high school injury landed him in an orthopedic physicians practice. Later, he joined a scholars and mentors program and spent time with the physicians because he thought bones and ligaments were “cool.” His fascination with the musculoskeletal system continued on into medical school as Busch began working on research with Daggett as a fellow in KCU’s Department of Anatomy. “Kyle was critical to the success of our work,” said Daggett. “Our findings have changed my clinical decisions as a surgeon and are impacting sports medicine worldwide.” Both Daggett and Busch have young daughters they want to protect from an ACL tear should they decide to take part in sports. Both hope to contribute to a body of knowledge that can eventually prevent the injury altogether. “In osteopathic medicine our emphasis is on wellness,” Daggett said. “Lots of people are talk about injury prevention but we are not doing enough about it. The more we understand the ligamentous structures, the better we will become at being able to prevent these life-long injuries.” Busch says he hopes to be involved in future studies Daggett conducts during his orthopedic residency at St. Mary’s Medical Center in Blue Springs, Mo., a suburb of Kansas City. He noted his appreciation to Daggett and the chance to participate in research during his student years. “It’s great that KCU recognizes research is broader than the work done with microscopes and goggles in the lab,” Busch said. “They encourage students to get involved in work which results in immediate patient impact. It gives me a sense of fulfillment and enjoyments knowing I am able to take part in something that will help people live better lives.”


On 24 June last year, the few hundred residents of a temporary village, hidden from view in the middle of a West Sussex soft fruit farm, received letters. They were signed by David Kay, the managing director of the Hall Hunter Partnership, a business that grows 10% of the UK’s strawberries, 19% of its raspberries and a whacking 42% of its blueberries across thousands of acres, of both glasshouses and polytunnels. The recipients were his seasonal workforce, some of the 3,000 pickers from Bulgaria, Romania and elsewhere who come here each year to get the harvest in, and without whom the business would simply not exist. “I wanted them to know that in the face of the vote for Brexit we would hang together as a family,” he says now, standing amid the mobile homes his workers live in during the summer months. The dwellings come dressed with satellite dishes pointed at news channels in Bulgaria, and pylons delivering high-speed wifi. Some have planted gardens. Tesco Direct delivers their groceries; coaches take them out on excursions.“I’m responsible for both a fruit farm and 2,100 beds,” Kay says. “That morning I met a lot of very sad and confused workers. For me, personally, it was a shock.” Kay may have wanted to reassure his employees in the immediate aftermath of the vote, but 11 months on their status is no clearer. Indeed, this tidy little village could now stand as a blunt symbol for one of the most serious but little talked about issues arising from the Brexit negotiations: the continued ability of this country to feed itself, if the deal goes wrong. Opponents of EU membership talked during the referendum campaign about sovereignty and control. They railed against the free movement of labour. What they didn’t mention is the way the British food supply chain has, over the past 30 years, become increasingly reliant on workers from elsewhere, both permanent residents and seasonal labour. Last month, as parliament wrapped up for the general election, the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Select Committee quietly published a short paper called Feeding the Nation: Labour Constraints. As it reported, around 20% of all employees in British agriculture come from abroad, these days mostly Romania and Bulgaria, while 63% of all staff employed by members of the British Meat Processors Association are not from the UK. Around 400,000 people work in food manufacturing here, and more than 30% of those are also from somewhere else. If free movement of labour stops, the British food industry won’t just face difficulties. Some parts will shudder to a halt. Shelves will be emptied. Prices will shoot up. And right now, none of those charged with negotiating Britain’s exit from the EU are making promises that this scenario will be averted. Many of them aren’t even engaging with the issue. The soft-fruit business of which Hall Hunter is a part is right at the sharp end of that. “From February to November we need 29,000 seasonal workers across the sector,” says Laurence Olins, chair of British Summer Fruits, the crop association for berries, which account for one in every £5 spent on fruit in the UK. “And 95% of those are non-UK EU citizens.” The industry has tried to get UK nationals to do the work but they’re simply not interested. “Our hope is for some sort of permit scheme,” Olins says. “But if, say, we get only half the permits we need, we will simply have only half the size of the industry.” The 29,000 non-UK workers they have are therefore vital. And, what’s more, the number required is growing. Kay agrees. “We’ve worked with job centres and with ex-prisoners, but British people don’t want to do these jobs.” Instead, he says, he gets a steady supply of highly educated and motivated eastern Europeans, most of whom have some connection to farming because their families still have smallholdings. “We have a return rate of 76% each year,” he says, “which means we retain a skills base – 70% of our management arrived here as pickers and worked their way up the ranks.” He shows me a list of the 20 most important people in the company and it’s littered with Slavic surnames – 20 nationalities are represented on site. Some have settled here, put their kids into schools and taken UK citizenship. But many more are just seasonal, coming and going at short notice. Every single one is interviewed for a job by a member of Kay’s team; they run temporary recruitment centres in town halls and civic libraries across eastern Europe. At the farm, amid glasshouses of glossy strawberries planted at shoulder height for easy picking, I meet Zyulfie Yusein, 29, and Nikoloy Kolev, 34. Both are from Bulgaria. Both are graduates. Both first came here to earn a little money as students, returning home with their earnings. Over the years, they’ve stayed longer and longer. “It’s a great job,” says Yusein. Kolev agrees. “We work as a team and the team is like family.” But both say the Brexit vote has changed everything. “I worry about the future,” Yusein says. “My friends worry too. The vote made me feel unsafe.” Kolev says, “Going back is not an option but what am I going to do?” They are warm, bright, friendly people, but the tension just beneath the surface is palpable. They are already experiencing the downside. The Brexit vote has weakened the pound by up to 20%. Their salaries are worth far less at home than once they were. And the message is getting back to their friends. “Some of the seasonal labour is choosing not to come to the UK because of the value of sterling,” Olins says. “If you can go to work in a Euro country like Spain, rather than Britain, it’s worth doing so.”There used to be 10 applicants for every picking job in the UK. Now there are three. “The candidates we’re getting are older, they have fewer skills, their English is worse.” Is that just down to Brexit? “The media in the home countries has been reporting attacks on immigrants to the UK,” he says. The mood here has changed. And it risks imperilling the harvest British citizens don’t want to help bring in. On 26 July, 2016, a little over a month after the referendum vote, representatives of more than 40 food and drink associations gathered in the meeting room on the sixth floor of the Food and Drink Federation’s HQ on London’s Bloomsbury Way. Here were representatives of the British Poultry Council and the Federation of Bakers, the British Growers Association, the National Association of Cider Makers and many more besides. They were joined by civil servants from Defra, the Food Standards Agency, the Department for Business, David Davis’s Brexit department and HMRC. The meeting had been called by Ian Wright, a former executive at drinks company Diageo who now heads the Food and Drink Federation. The meeting was to coordinate a response to Brexit. And top of the agenda was the issue of labour. The same group has met every month since. “It’s fair to say that we started out with a degree of surprise at all levels,” Wright says. “Very few ministers or civil servants understood the nature of the food-chain workforce.” He believes they have managed to get the message across, but that’s a very different thing to dealing with the issue, given the refusal by Downing Street to be drawn on their negotiating positions. “Right now, there’s a great deal of work going on to define the choices the prime minister will have to take to sustain the variety and complexity of the food supply chain.” The alternative, he says, is fewer choices for consumers or sources of labour from outside the EU. Early in this election campaign Labour’s Brexit spokesman, Keir Starmer, made a commitment to guarantee the rights of the estimated 3.9 million EU citizens living in the UK on day one of a Labour government. David Davis met this with a soothing assertion of a swift deal to secure those rights. That’s not surprising. The non-UK citizens here are mostly of working age and economically active. The 900,000 UK citizens in Europe are mostly pensioners living out their retirement on the sun belt in increasingly poor health. Theresa May’s government is desperate not to have them sent back for fear of the pressure they will place on the NHS. But what matters is not those living here full-time but the seasonal workforce that comes and goes. Until 2013, there was a seasonal-labour permit scheme which, ironically, was abolished, because the EU free movement system was deemed to be working so well. A replacement would be needed. Pushed for a number of permits required, Wright suggests “around half a million”. Hard-line Brexiters, committed to an end to the free movement of labour, might well find this unpalatable. Indeed, one of the big food-sector bodies told me they received off-the-record calls from civil servants warning them to shut up, because they had been quoted in newspapers talking about the seriousness of the labour supply to the food chain. “We were told we would just enrage the hard-line Brexiteers,” a member of the body told me. The problem is compounded because some sectors need a huge mass of workers. Others need very few. In some areas of the food chain, it can be down to just a few dozen people who keep the whole thing running. For example, under Food Standards Agency rules, an abattoir in England, Wales or Northern Ireland cannot operate unless the animals on the way to slaughter are overseen by one of their vets. This is work British vets don’t want to do. They would rather be out on the farm with livestock in the prime of their lives, or dealing with domestic pets. As a result, at least 85% of vets in British abattoirs are not from the UK. Apparently, the majority are Spanish. And if they couldn’t get into the country to do the job, the meat supply chain would collapse. While Ian Wright is good at the diplomatic phrase, others feel less constrained. In the months running up to the Brexit referendum, Tim Lang, professor of food policy at London’s City University, co-authored a briefing paper on Britain’s dependency on EU member states for its food. It dealt in detail with seasonal labour from the EU. He can be forgiven for wondering why he bothered. “The civil service is dispirited and uncertain of what they’re doing because they haven’t been given any signals,” Lang says now. “There’s not a bleep about food policy coming from ministers. There has been a stunning silence from Andrea Leadsom, the Defra minister, on this matter of national importance. Basically, if on March 31, 2019, migrant labour is not sorted the food system is fucked.” And then he says, “I hope those who voted Brexit and who still want to eat British are prepared to go to Lincolnshire in winter to pick vegetables.” Or as Wright puts it, “Food is at the heart of national security. If you can’t feed a country you haven’t got a country.” For five years as a food reporter for the BBC’s One Show, I used to travel the country from one strip-lit food production unit to another, looking at exactly where our food came from. The ethnic mix was always striking. The media were forever talking about a British food revolution; of a homegrown improvement in quality at both small and large scale. And the companies were indeed British, but so many of the people doing the actual producing were not. I visited cake factories where the health and safety notices were in both English and Polish; was given tours of vegetable processing plants where the floor managers needed a smattering of four eastern European languages to get by. I take a train north from Hall Hunter’s fruit farm, to the North Yorkshire home of Heck Sausages, run by Debbie and Andrew Keeble. In just four years their innovative range of gluten-free sausages – from pork and apple, through square to non-meat alternatives – has been stocked by all the major supermarkets. Their turnover is projected to reach £18m this year and they are about to move into a new plant which will enable them to run multiple production lines. The only issue is workforce, which will have to double. Of the 60 people currently working in production, 85% are from eastern Europe; like Hall Hunter, Heck can’t get British people to do the work. I ask Debbie Keeble what an end to free movement of labour would mean to her business. “It would be cataclysmic,” she says. “No one here will take these jobs.” The Heck factory is in an area that voted strongly for Brexit. “During the referendum, campaigners were going on about people coming over here taking our jobs. Well, they’re not, because nobody here applies for them.” Mostly she says it’s word of mouth, with new employees coming either directly from Latvia or Romania or from within the communities in the UK. I talk to one young Romanian woman, Georgeta Iclodean, who talks about getting increasing amounts of hassle from Border Agency officials when she re-enters Britain. “I make sure to have all my papers with me now,” she says. I meet 34-year-old Vladim Protasovs from Latvia who came to Heck in 2014 and has risen to be one of the line managers. “I like working in the UK,” he says. “It’s a very big difference from Latvia.” But Brexit has changed everything. “My children are settled in school here,” he says. “If we had to go back it would be so hard, not just for me but for them. There’s lot of people who want to come from Latvia to work in the UK, but they are worried. I call my friends to say there are jobs but they don’t want to come.” Then he says: “What happens next?” It’s a good question. The truth is nobody knows, not the business leaders, not the diplomats and certainly not the politicians. The prime minister and her team have portrayed negotiations as a game of poker, used the language of hands unrevealed and bluffs, while failing to recognise that the analogy doesn’t work; poker is a winner-takes-all game and Britain cannot afford to lose everything. The Brexit deal isn’t just about vague concepts of nationhood. It isn’t simply about international standing or the ebb and flow of trade.It’s about the lives of individual people like Protasovs and Iclodean, Yusein and Kolev; the ones prepared to do the back-breaking jobs British people are not. What’s more, this is not just their crisis, to be worked out in anguished letters home. It’s ours too. Because without them and the half a million seasonal workers like them, our very ability to feed ourselves, at a price we can all afford, is in peril. In the forthcoming Brexit negotiations that is what’s really at stake.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

For Shafer, Kline & Warren’s (SKW) engineers, the work on the intersections surrounding Independence Avenue and The Paseo began in 2002 with the goal of improving safety for drivers and pedestrians. Today, their design work is part of a comprehensive housing, transportation and urban development project to improve the Paseo Gateway district and create a safe, welcoming and vibrant community in the Northeast area of Kansas City, Missouri. This month, SKW kicked off the design phase of the $12 million Paseo Gateway transportation project to improve an intersection that has been historically ranked as one of the top five high-crash locations in the City of Kansas City. The transportation project is one pillar of the revitalization of the Paseo Gateway community, for which the City received a five-year $30 million federal Housing and Urban Development grant to invest in the area. “It’s an exciting opportunity to make an impactful statement on a part of town that needs the help,” said SKW Transportation Team Leader Jay Burress. “It’s gratifying to move forward on a project we have been conversing with City leaders about for more than a decade. It’s a high-crash area. As engineers, we like to fix things that don’t work well to make them right and help keep people safe.” In 2004, SKW designed an interim improvement for the intersection, which mitigated some of the danger of the intersection, but the scope of the project was limited by budgetary constraints. Then, throughout the past year and a half, SKW has worked with Zimmerman/Volk Associates, Shockey & Associates and Taliaferro & Browne on the pre-design phases of the project, which included economic impact studies, the drafting of 10 potential alignments for the intersection, and meetings with the public and other area stakeholders. Kansas City’s Parks and Recreation Department has plans to include an architectural feature in the intersection to create a gateway to downtown and the boulevard system. Additionally, plans for the area are focused on creating business and economic growth opportunities as well as revitalizing an area park. “It has truly been a collaborative process,” said Burress. “We worked to ensure the design selected was a win for all those involved. It needed to benefit the neighborhood and its residents while meeting the desires of Kansas City University and supporting future businesses coming to the area.” The design will include reducing the intersection of Independence Avenue and the north and southbound lanes of The Paseo to a single, typical intersection with left turn lanes. This change will increase capacity for the intersection while reducing crashes. Additionally, a bridge on Cliff Drive will be removed, and the intersection of Cliff Drive and The Paseo will become a typical intersection, which will eliminate the merge and weaving issues that currently occur. “In some ways, this reminds me of the Barry Road project in Kansas City, Missouri,” said Burress. “People were dying there because of roads and bridges that didn’t function well. We helped address that with a multi-phased roadway design project to accommodate the increased traffic and improve safety. Together with the addition of Zona Rosa, that project helped change the whole area. It would be amazing if we could similarly help flip the Paseo Gateway community.” On March 20, the City began work to raze the Royale Inn as part of the comprehensive neighborhood project. Construction on the transportation portion of the project is anticipated to begin in spring 2019.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has analyzed more than a dozen metrics to rank Missouri’s best universities and colleges for 2017. Of the 40 four-year schools on the list, Washington University in St. Louis, Saint Louis University, Maryville University of Saint Louis, William Jewell College and Rockhurst University were the top five. 14 two-year schools also made the list, and State Fair Community College, Crowder College, Jefferson College, East Central College and State Technical College of Missouri were ranked as the best five. A full list of the winning schools is included below. “The schools on our list have created high-quality learning experiences for students in Missouri, with career outcomes in mind,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.Org. “They’ve shown this through the certificates and degrees that they offer, paired with excellent employment services and a record of strong post-college earnings for grads.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in Missouri” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also appraised on additional data that includes annual alumni salaries 10 years after entering college, employment services, student/teacher ratio, graduation rate and the availability of financial aid. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Missouri” list, visit: The Best Four-Year Colleges in Missouri for 2017 include: Avila University Baptist Bible College Calvary Bible College and Theological Seminary Central Methodist University-College of Liberal Arts and Sciences College of the Ozarks Columbia College Culver-Stockton College Drury University Evangel University Fontbonne University Hannibal-LaGrange University Harris-Stowe State University Kansas City Art Institute Lincoln University Lindenwood University Maryville University of Saint Louis Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary Missouri Baptist University Missouri Southern State University Missouri State University-Springfield Missouri University of Science and Technology Missouri Valley College Missouri Western State University Northwest Missouri State University Park University Rockhurst University Saint Louis University Southeast Missouri State University Southwest Baptist University Stephens College Truman State University University of Central Missouri University of Missouri-Columbia University of Missouri-Kansas City University of Missouri-St Louis Washington University in St Louis Webster University Westminster College William Jewell College William Woods University Missouri’s Best Two-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Crowder College East Central College Jefferson College Lake Career and Technical Center Mineral Area College Missouri State University - West Plains Moberly Area Community College North Central Missouri College Ozarks Technical Community College St. Charles Community College State Fair Community College State Technical College of Missouri Texas County Technical College Three Rivers Community College About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Brain Injury Association of America recognizes March as Brain Injury Awareness Month, a time that hits close to home for one KCU medical student. It’s also a time to raise awareness about the 2.4 million children and adults in the U.S. who sustain a traumatic brain injury each year, along with another 795,000 who suffer an acquired brain injury from non-traumatic causes. For Landon Sowell, a first-year medical student at Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences (KCU), it’s a time to reflect on his own medical miracle and his dream of offering hope to someone else. When he was 7 years old, Sowell suffered a kick to the head while feeding horses near Fulton, Kentucky. The horse’s hoof struck him just behind his right ear. The first grader was rushed to a local emergency room and immediately transferred to Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital in Nashville, Tennessee, with a fractured skull, brain swelling and bleeding in his brain. “He looked like he had been in a boxing match with all the swelling,” said his mother DeAnna Reams. “He was unresponsive and did not look like my sweet, vibrant little boy.” Sowell survived the injury, but the medical team prepared his family for the possibility that he might never be that vibrant little boy they once knew; that he might have suffered permanent physical injury and learning disabilities. “The doctors weren’t sure if I would make it to 20 years old and be fully functional,” said Sowell. In the beginning, he couldn’t stand, walk or coordinate his arms and hands well enough to catch a ball. He couldn’t repeat a sequence of words to test his speech, and the kick was so forceful that he was left with impaired vision and crossed eyes. “I woke up in a neck brace,” Sowell remembered. “I couldn’t move my arms or legs or speak. I had to use a wheelchair, I had to learn everything again; it was such a strain just to put a puzzle together.” Much to the surprise and delight of his family and medical team, Sowell slowly gained back the ground he had lost. Following a year of intense physical therapy and surgery to correct his eyes, Sowell regained physical function and cognitive ability. He wasn’t allowed to play sports out of concern that he could sustain a concussion or suffer seizures, but he excelled academically in high school and college. Inspired by the physicians who treated him, Sowell decided to go into medicine. In August of 2016, he began medical school at KCU. “This is truly an amazing story,” said CenterPoint Medical Center’s David D. Dyke Jr., DO, an internationally renowned concussion expert and president of the Brain Injury Association of Missouri. “It is rare to have moderate to severe brain injury and still make it into medical school.” Dyke says the brain remains a mystery on many levels, but there is more interest in studying the brain and brain injuries. “We are just scratching the surface, even though our knowledge has increased dramatically over the past 10 years.” Dyke believes Landon’s young age at the time of his injury had an impact on the ability of his brain to heal, but notes the importance of focusing on brain injury prevention, especially in adolescents. Sowell wants to use what he calls his “second chance” in life to provide not only medical care, but also hope to kids and parents who show up in the ER with injuries similar to his. “I want to make a difference,” he said. “If a little kid comes into the ER and I see them in the condition I was in, I want to demonstrate that recovery is possible.” Sowell credits his confidence in achieving his goal of becoming a doctor to his Christian faith and his ability overcome profound physical challenges. His near-death encounter as a child puts life into perspective even today. “My mom says it kicked common sense into me,” he said with a smile. “That experience proves there is nothing so bad that can ruin your day, nothing so bad you can’t get over, and always look for the most positive thing, no matter what it is.”

Loading City University collaborators
Loading City University collaborators