Saskatoon, Canada
Saskatoon, Canada

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This document corrects and replaces the press release that was sent today at 12:00 pm ET. The governments of Canada and Saskatchewan, along with Camponi Housing Corporation, announced funding for a new rental housing project for low- to moderate-income individuals and families in Saskatoon. The Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development and Minister Responsible for Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), and the Honourable Tina Beaudry-Mellor, Minister of Social Services and Minister Responsible for the Saskatchewan Housing Corporation, made the announcement today. "Our Government is dedicated to helping those in need, which is why we are proud to have invested in this project in Saskatoon. These new units are more than just safe and affordable places to live, they are key to a better life for the residents who will call them home." - Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development and Minister Responsible for Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation "We are pleased to have been a part of this project to support Saskatoon individuals and families in greatest housing need. Together with the Government of Canada and Camponi Housing Corporation, we are making a difference and helping people achieve strength and stability beginning with safe, quality and affordable housing."- Honourable Tina Beaudry-Mellor, Minister of Social Services and Minister Responsible for Saskatchewan Housing Corporation "Camponi Housing Corporation is aware of the crisis facing Aboriginal peoples, the attendant social problems and the need to provide supports that will meaningfully improve the health and well-being of our tenants. The provision of safe, adequate, supportive and affordable housing is essential to the overall community well-being and impacts on every individual living within Saskatoon. Joint initiatives like this one benefit all families within the City of Saskatoon." - Angela Bishop, Chair, Camponi Housing Corporation


SASKATOON, SASKATCHEWAN--(Marketwired - April 18, 2017) - The governments of Canada and Saskatchewan, along with Camponi Housing Corporation, announced funding for a new rental housing project for low- to moderate-income individuals and families in Saskatoon. The Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development and Minister Responsible for Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), and the Honourable Tina Beaudry-Mellor, Minister of Social Services and Minister Responsible for the Saskatchewan Housing Corporation, made the announcement today. "Our Government is dedicated to helping those in need, which is why we are proud to have invested in this project in Saskatoon. These new are more than just safe and affordable places to live, they are key to a better life for the residents who will call them home." - Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development and Minister Responsible for Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation "We are pleased to have been a part of this project to support Saskatoon individuals and families in greatest housing need. Together with the Government of Canada and Camponi Housing Corporation, we are making a difference and helping people achieve strength and stability beginning with safe, quality and affordable housing."- Honourable Tina Beaudry-Mellor, Minister of Social Services and Minister Responsible for Saskatchewan Housing Corporation "Camponi Housing Corporation is aware of the crisis facing Aboriginal peoples, the attendant social problems and the need to provide supports that will meaningfully improve the health and well-being of our tenants. The provision of safe, adequate, supportive and affordable housing is essential to the overall community well-being and impacts on every individual living within Saskatoon. Joint initiatives like this one benefit all families within the City of Saskatoon." - Angela Bishop, Chair, Camponi Housing Corporation


News Article | June 22, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

SASKATOON, SASKATCHEWAN--(Marketwired - June 22, 2017) - The Governments of Canada and Saskatchewan, along with Elim Lodge Inc. (Elim), officially opened Hyde Park View, a new 140-unit rental housing project for seniors in Saskatoon. Fifteen units are designated for seniors with low-to moderate- incomes. The Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development and Minister Responsible for Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), and the Honourable Don Morgan, Minister of Education and Member of the Legislative Assembly for Saskatoon Southeast, on behalf of the Honourable Tina Beaudry-Mellor, Minister of Social Services and Minister Responsible for the Saskatchewan Housing Corporation (SHC), made the announcement today. "The Government of Canada made a commitment to help Canada's seniors, and we are following through on that commitment with this important investment. Our Government is proud that we could play a role in assisting seniors with low incomes meet their housing needs by providing funding for this important project. We will continue working with groups such as Elim Lodge to ensure vulnerable groups have access to safe and affordable housing." - Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development and Minister Responsible for Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation "We are pleased to have been a part of the Hyde Park View project to provide Saskatoon seniors with a safe, quality home that meets their respective needs. Everyone needs a place to call home, and today's event demonstrates what we can achieve when we work together. Our government is committed to supporting those in greatest housing need, and helping to provide seniors an opportunity to live in a safe, stable community environment." - Honourable Don Morgan, Minister of Education and Member of the Legislative Assembly for Saskatoon Southeast "The City of Saskatoon is pleased to partner on this investment that will help Saskatoon seniors have secure housing and a greater sense of community. What makes this project so significant is that over 10 percent of Hyde Park View's units are designated for seniors that have lower incomes, helping to make Saskatoon a city that better supports our more vulnerable citizens and neighbours." - His Worship Charlie Clark, Mayor, City of Saskatoon "Providing affordable housing for 50-plus adults is the mandate of Elim Lodge Inc. Our new facility, Hyde Park View, adds 140 suites and 216,000 square feet of living space to the Saskatoon senior housing market. This major expansion for our not-for-profit corporation was made possible, in part, by the generous financial support of the Government of Canada and the Province of Saskatchewan. We are grateful for the visionary initiative of our governments to partner with organizations like ours to provide much-needed affordable housing units." - Greg Foley, Chief Executive Officer, Elim Lodge Inc. - CMHC has been helping Canadians meet their housing needs for more than 70 years. As Canada's authority on housing, CMHC contributes to the stability of the housing market and financial system, provides support for Canadians in housing need, and offers unbiased housing research and advice to Canadian governments, consumers and the housing industry. Prudent risk management, strong corporate governance and transparency are cornerstones of CMHC's operations. For more information, please call 1-800-668-2642 or visit www.cmhc.ca or follow CMHC Twitter, YouTube, LinkedIn and Facebook. - In October 2012, the Government of Saskatchewan released the Saskatchewan Plan for Growth: Vision 2020 and Beyond, which sets out the Government's vision for a province of 1.2 million people by 2020. The Plan identifies principles, goals and actions to ensure Saskatchewan is capturing the opportunities and meeting the challenges of a growing province. Since 2007, the Government of Saskatchewan has invested over $750 million to develop or repair more than 15,500 housing units across our province.


Berthelot C.,University of Saskatchewan | Haichert R.,PSI Technologies Inc. | Podborochynski D.,University of Saskatchewan | Wandzura C.,University of Saskatchewan | And 2 more authors.
Transportation Research Record | Year: 2011

The City of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, commissioned the "Green Street" Infrastructure Program to investigate the potential of using recycled reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and portland cement concrete (PCC) rubble as structural road layers. This study validated the mechanistic materials characterization and structural design of a field test section constructed using recycled RAP and PCC materials in addition to in situ reclaimed and recycled road materials. This paper presents a summary case study of the Green Street test section on 8th Street in Saskatoon. The rehabilitation of 8th Street consisted of two pavement rehabilitation systems: one incorporated a drainage layer and the other did not. The rehabilitation of the right-turn lane included a drainage system incorporating City of Saskatoon offsite impact-crushed PCC rubble material. The entire right-hand-turn lane and sections of the median lane and the driving lane were rehabilitated by rotomixing hot-mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) and granular base layers and adding offsite impact-crushed RAP to top up the remixed base layer. The top 200 mm of this remixed base layer was stabilized with cement-emulsion. The entire 8th Street test section was surfaced with typical City of Saskatoon HMAC. When subjected to mechanistic triaxial frequency sweep characterization, both the cement-emulsion-stabilized in situ remix material (utilized as a black base course) and the HMAC surfacing materials showed good mechanistic structural material constitutive behavior. The stabilized in situ remix material yielded end-product mechanistic material behavior that exceeded that of the HMAC surfacing.


Haichert R.,PSI Technologies Inc. | Kelln R.,PSI Technologies Inc. | Wandzura C.,University of Saskatchewan | Berthelot C.,PSI Technologies Inc. | Guenther D.,City of Saskatoon
Transportation Research Record | Year: 2012

Challenges in finding high-quality sources of natural aggregate have led Saskatchewan, Canada, road agencies to explore alternative solutions to meet aggregate demands. The use of recycled materials, such as recycled portland cement concrete (PCC), though traditionally limited to low-quality applications such as subbase or backfill materials, shows promise as a technically viable solution that also offers economic and environmental advantages. In this study, mechanistic material testing was used to examine the effects of cement stabilization on traditional granular base and on two impact-crushed recycled PCC materials from different locations. The unstabilized PCC materials had substantially better mechanistic material properties than the unstabilized conventional granular base material; this result indicates that PCC materials could be suitable for use in high-quality applications, such as base course layers, rather than being limited to use in low-quality applications, such as utility and embankment fills. This study also showed that cement stabilization substantially improved the mechanistic properties of conventional granular base material, yet had a much less pronounced effect on the material properties of the PCC materials. This result may be attributable to poor absorption of the cement by the PCC or a lack of rehydration of the PCC. There was minimal variability in the mechanical behavior of the PCC specimens despite a difference in stockpile location. Both types of PCC material were processed and crushed with the same technique and equipment.


Johnson K.,AECOM Technology Corporation | Sexsmith C.,City of Saskatoon
Proceedings, Annual Conference - Canadian Society for Civil Engineering | Year: 2012

The Yukon and White Pass Railway was the first major civil engineering project in North America north of the 60th latitude. Constructed in 27 months from 1898 to 1900, this 176 kilometre narrow gauge railway carried thousands of prospectors and their supplies to the Klondike Gold Rush from the Pacific Ocean. The railway provided the first efficient transportation link from the Port of Skagway, Alaska over the coast mountain range into the interior of the Yukon, and opened up the Yukon Territory to significant development by providing a major all-season transportation link for the territory for over 80 years. The railway also had an important role in the construction of the Alaska Highway, and the transport of ore from the Yukon mines to southern markets. The narrow gauge Yukon and White Pass Railway climbs almost 873 metres from sea level at the Port of Skagway to the White Pass summit in a distance of only 32 kilometres. This steep grade over the coast mountains was constructed with manual labour; the main equipment, aside from blasting powder, consisted of picks and shovels. The railway construction was maintained during the severe working conditions of a sub-arctic winter, and necessitated the development of construction techniques for permafrost areas, as well as cold region construction logistics and management.


Clancy D.V.,City of Saskatoon | Higgins S.L.,City of Saskatoon
Proceedings, Annual Conference - Canadian Society for Civil Engineering | Year: 2010

Many municipalities and utilities are aware of the need for asset management but struggle with organizational issues that impede strategic and tactical planning. Boards and councils are hesitant to set a direction for the agency without fully understanding economic and service implications. With limited resources and growing difficulties in maintaining services, staff are often too busy with daily operations to concentrate resources on defining the condition of assets, critical information that would lead to an effective tactical and strategic direction. Caught in the middle are customers who want a good service at a low cost, but are unaware of potential future costs and service impacts of deterioration in the networks that deliver their service. Whether initiated by directors or by staff, the goal is to develop asset management within the organization through interaction between directors and staff.


This study compares the performance of uncalibrated and calibrated Highway Safety Manual (HSM) safety performance functions (SPFs) with jurisdiction-specific SPFs. The first edition of the HSM includes a number of SPFs which can be used to identify collision-prone locations on a roadway network. The HSM recommends that these SPFs be calibrated to more accurately reflect a specific jurisdiction's unique roadway characteristics, driver behaviour, etc. and to produce better-fitting results. An alternative approach is the creation of jurisdiction-specific SPFs. This study used negative binomial regression and 5 years of collision data (2005-2009) from the City of Regina, Saskatchewan to develop a set of SPFs. Three intersection categories were investigated: 3-leg unsignalized, 4-leg unsignalized, and 3-and 4-leg signalized. The SPFs provided in the HSM were calibrated using the Regina data, and a set of calibration factors was produced. To compare the different SPFs and find the best-fitting SPFs for the study region, the study used statistical goodness-of-fit tests and cumulative residual plots. The jurisdiction-specific SPFs provided the best fit to the data, and would be the best SPFs for predicting collisions at 3-and 4-leg intersections in the City of Regina.


Foth M.,University of Saskatchewan | Guenther D.,City of Saskatoon | Haichert R.,PSI Technologies | Berthelot C.,University of Saskatchewan
Green Streets and Highways 2010: An Interactive Conference on the State of the Art and How to Achieve Sustainable Outcomes - Proceedings of the Green Streets and Highways 2010 Conference | Year: 2010

In 2006 the City of Saskatoon recognized that the large amounts of asphalt and concrete rubble materials stockpiled in its yards must be addressed. After experimenting with the material as a replacement backfill material with City forces, the City determined that improved engineering specifications and structural design processes needed to be implemented to facilitate the standard use of the recycled aggregates. In 2009, the City of Saskatoon developed the Green Streets Program to pilot the use of advanced mechanistic engineering and state of the art impact crushing of rubble materials for roadway construction. For the program to be considered successful value added processing, mechanistic-climatic characterization and sustainable holistic life cycle analysis had to be considered. Based on the findings of the City of Saskatoon Green Streets Program, the City is now producing five types of high value specified crushed concrete materials, and three types of specified asphalt aggregate materials. These materials are being used as subbase, base course, drainage rock, stress dissipation layers and structural black base. From a mechanistic engineering characterization perspective, this research shows the crushed concrete and crushed asphalt aggregates are technically superior to conventional locally available aggregates. The City of Saskatoon Green Streets Program identified many benefits achieved through the use of recycled materials in road construction on a technical, social, environmental and economic basis. Residents are provided a roadway with superior structural performance and waste rubble generated from aging city infrastructure is diverted from landfills. In addition, the cost savings generated by the Green Streets Project was determined to be approximately 55 percent through the structurally equivalent substitution of recycled aggregates for virgin sourced aggregates. To further address the key aspects of road infrastructure sustainability the quantification of the energy used to rehabilitate roads and carbon generation during roadway rehabilitation will assist in quantifying the benefits of sustainable construction solutions. The future implementation of mechanistic based End Product Specifications will also ensure that the City will have a reliable engineering framework from which to employ innovative and sustainable road infrastructure solutions utilizing recycled road materials. © 2010 ASCE.


Azinfar H.,City of Saskatoon | Azinfar H.,University of Saskatchewan | Kells J.A.,University of Saskatchewan
Journal of Hydraulic Research | Year: 2011

This study focuses on quantifying the flow resistance and the associated backwater effect of a spur dike field in an open channel flow. The work was carried out in a rigid bed flume. The model spur dikes were simulated using two-dimensional (2D), rectangular plates placed in an array along one side of the flume. The results indicate that the arrangement of a spur dike field has a substantial effect on the drag force and hence the backwater effect that is experienced. In general, the total drag force of a spur dike field increases as the number of spur dikes and the relative spacing between them increase. The most upstream spur dike experienced the greatest drag force among the entire spur field, essentially acting as a shield, resulting in a reduction in the drag force of the downstream spur dikes. © 2011 International Association for Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research.

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