City of Laval

Laval, Canada

City of Laval

Laval, Canada
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Besner M.-C.,Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal | Broseus R.,Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal | Lavoie J.,City of Laval | Di Giovanni G.,Texas AgriLife Research Center | And 2 more authors.
Environmental Science and Technology | Year: 2010

The 1990s epidemiological studies by Payment and colleagues suggested that an increase in gastrointestinal illnesses observed in the population consuming tap water from a system meeting all water quality regulations might be associated with distribution system deficiencies. In the current study, the vulnerability of this distribution system to microbial intrusion wasassessedbycharacterizingpotentialsourcesofcontamination near pipelines and monitoring the frequency and magnitude of negative pressures. Bacterial indicators of fecal contamination were recovered more frequently in the water from flooded airvalve vaults than in the soil or water from pipe trenches. The level of fecal contamination in these various sources was more similar to levels from river water rather than wastewater. Because of its configuration, this distribution system is vulnerable to negative pressures when pressure values out of the treatment plant reach or drop below 172 kPa (25 psi), which occurred nine times during a monitoring period of 17 months. The results from this investigation suggest that this distribution system is vulnerable to contamination by intrusion. Comparison of the frequency of occurrence of negative pressure events andrepair rates with data from other distribution systems suggests that the system studied by Payment and colleagues is not atypical. © 2010 American Chemical Society.


News Article | December 2, 2015
Site: www.materialstoday.com

M1 Composites Technology Inc has relocated to a larger facility in Laval, Quebec. The new 27,000 ft2 headquarters is designed to support company growth and promote better servicing for customers. ‘We are proud to have a world-class facility in the City of Laval, which is at the heart of the Montreal Aerospace Hub,’ said Lorenzo Marandola, President – M1 Composites. ‘Our new facilities and equipment will accommodate a higher volume of parts while increasing our operational flow.’ M1 Composites Technology provides a wide range of aerospace services including engineering, manufacturing, and repair, in addition to non-destructive testing (NDT) of composite and sheet metal components such as nacelles, flight control surfaces, radomes, interior components and other critical structures. This story is reprinted from material from M1 Composites, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.


News Article | December 19, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

LAVAL, QUEBEC--(Marketwired - Dec. 19, 2016) - The citizens of Laval and surrounding areas can now enjoy quality drinking water thanks to a major investment by the governments of Canada and Quebec to upgrade the Chomedey, Pont-Viau and Sainte-Rose water treatment plants in Laval. This project will help improve residents' quality of life, upgrade community infrastructure and promote sustainable development and prosperity for the community. The announcement was made today by Eva Nassif, Member of Parliament for Vimy, Yves Robillard, Member of Parliament for Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, and Angelo Iacono, Member of Parliament for Alfred-Pellan, on behalf of the Honourable Amarjeet Sohi, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, and Francine Charbonneau, Minister responsible for Seniors and Anti-Bullying, Minister responsible for the Laval region, and Member of the National Assembly for Mille-Îles, who was accompanied by the three Members of the National Assembly for Laval, Jean Habel, Guy Ouellette and Saul Polo, on behalf of the Martin Coiteux, Minister of Municipal Affairs and Land Occupancy, Minister of Public Security and Minister responsible for the Montréal region. Mr. Marc Demers, Mayor of Laval, was also in attendance. The government representatives took the opportunity to recognize the significant financial contribution of over $93 million granted to the City of Laval for this project under the Building Canada Fund−Quebec, Major Projects Component. The Laval project consisted of upgrading its three water treatment plants: Chomedey, Pont-Viau and Sainte-Rose. Work involved expanding and renovating the buildings to accommodate new and upgraded equipment designed to improve filtration, decantation and disinfection efficiency, as well as upgrading the pumping and automation systems to ensure greater control over water treatment processes. Upon completion, the governments of Canada and Quebec will have each contributed $46,820,000, for a total of $93,640,000. The City of Laval will have contributed $100 million to complete this project. "Nothing is more important for the health and prosperity of Canadian communities than having access to high-quality drinking water. It is essential that all residents have access to modern, reliable and safe infrastructure for their drinking water supply. I am pleased to see that this funding made it possible to carry out improvements related to drinking water, which will enhance residents' quality of life for years to come." Eva Nassif, Member of Parliament for Vimy, on behalf of the Honourable Amarjeet Sohi, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities "The Government of Canada recognizes that water infrastructure is crucial to the health of Canadians and essential to the clean-up of our waterways and environment. With our regional partners, we are committed to ensuring that they get the support they need to create sustainable communities. We are making investments that improve the quality of people's lives, contribute to economic growth and establish a strong middle class." ΓǃThe Government of Quebec is pleased to see the completion of the work to upgrade the Laval water treatment plants. Its support for this important project is a testament of its commitment to ensuring ongoing support for municipalities and encouraging them in their initiatives. This is the case for the completion of the work carried out on Laval's drinking water production facilities, which we are celebrating today. The project contributes to better water management for the City, in addition to guaranteeing solid and sustainable infrastructure and providing citizens with quality drinking water for many years to come." Francine Charbonneau, Minister responsible for Seniors and Anti-Bullying, Minister responsible for the Laval region, and MNA for Mille-Îles, on behalf of Martin Coiteux, Minister of Municipal Affairs and Land Occupancy, Minister of Public Security, and Minister responsible for the Montréal region Jean Habel, Guy Ouellette and Saul Polo, MNAs for Sainte-Rose, Chomedey and Laval-des-Rapides are proud to be taking part in the inauguration of the Laval water treatment plants. It is through concrete actions, like the one that has brought us together today, that we collaborate to maintain and renew public infrastructure, thereby improving public utilities. By modernizing our infrastructure, we are improving the quality of life of our citizens and supporting the economic vitality of a thriving community such as ours. "Thanks to investments under the Major Projects Component of the Building Canada Fund−Quebec, work completed on the Pont-Viau, Chomedey and Sainte-Rose water facilities will allow us to meet the demand for drinking water from our growing population, indicated Marc Demers, Mayor of Laval. Laval is pleased to offer high quality water that exceeds government standards and receives annual distinctions under the Programme d'excellence en eau potable (Program for excellence in drinking water) from Réseau Environnement." The Major Projects Component of the Building Canada Fund: www.infrastructure.gc.ca/prog/bcf-fcc-eng.html


Autixier L.,E Source | Autixier L.,Station Center ville | Mailhot A.,Center Eau Terre Environnement | Bolduc S.,Center Eau Terre Environnement | And 5 more authors.
Science of the Total Environment | Year: 2014

The implications of climate change and changing precipitation patterns need to be investigated to evaluate mitigation measures for source water protection. Potential solutions need first to be evaluated under present climate conditions to determine their utility as climate change adaptation strategies. An urban drainage network receiving both stormwater and wastewater was studied to evaluate potential solutions to reduce the impact of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) in a drinking water source. A detailed hydraulic model was applied to the drainage basin to model the implementation of best management practices at a drainage basin scale. The model was calibrated and validated with field data of CSO flows for seven events from a survey conducted in 2009 and 2010. Rain gardens were evaluated for their reduction of volumes of water entering the drainage network and of CSOs. Scenarios with different levels of implementation were considered and evaluated. Of the total impervious area within the basin directly connected to the sewer system, a maximum of 21% could be alternately directed towards rain gardens. The runoff reductions for the entire catchment ranged from 12.7% to 19.4% depending on the event considered. The maximum discharged volume reduction ranged from 13% to 62% and the maximum peak flow rate reduction ranged from 7% to 56%. Of concern is that in-sewer sediment resuspension is an important process to consider with regard to the efficacy of best management practices aimed at reducing extreme loads and concentrations. Rain gardens were less effective for large events, which are of greater importance for drinking water sources. These practices could increase peak instantaneous loads as a result of greater in-sewer resuspension during large events. Multiple interventions would be required to achieve the objectives of reducing the number, total volumes and peak contaminant loads of overflows upstream of drinking water intakes. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Besner M.C.,Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal | Ebacher G.,Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal | Jung B.S.,MWH Soft Inc. | Karney B.,University of Toronto | And 3 more authors.
Drinking Water Engineering and Science | Year: 2010

Various investigations encompassing microbial characterization of external sources of contamination (soil and trenchwater surrounding water mains, flooded air-valve vaults), field pressure monitoring, and hydraulic and transient analyses were conducted in the same distribution system where two epidemiological studies showing an increase in gastrointestinal illness for people drinking tap water were conducted in the 1990's. Interesting results include the detection of microorganisms indicators of fecal contamination in all external sources investigated but at a higher frequency in the water from flooded air-valve vaults, and the recording of 18 negative pressure events in the distribution system during a 17-month monitoring period. Transient analysis of this large and complex distribution system was challenging and highlighted the need to consider field pressure data in the process. © Author(s) 2010.


PubMed | Center Eau Terre Environnement, Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal and City of Laval
Type: | Journal: The Science of the total environment | Year: 2014

The implications of climate change and changing precipitation patterns need to be investigated to evaluate mitigation measures for source water protection. Potential solutions need first to be evaluated under present climate conditions to determine their utility as climate change adaptation strategies. An urban drainage network receiving both stormwater and wastewater was studied to evaluate potential solutions to reduce the impact of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) in a drinking water source. A detailed hydraulic model was applied to the drainage basin to model the implementation of best management practices at a drainage basin scale. The model was calibrated and validated with field data of CSO flows for seven events from a survey conducted in 2009 and 2010. Rain gardens were evaluated for their reduction of volumes of water entering the drainage network and of CSOs. Scenarios with different levels of implementation were considered and evaluated. Of the total impervious area within the basin directly connected to the sewer system, a maximum of 21% could be alternately directed towards rain gardens. The runoff reductions for the entire catchment ranged from 12.7% to 19.4% depending on the event considered. The maximum discharged volume reduction ranged from 13% to 62% and the maximum peak flow rate reduction ranged from 7% to 56%. Of concern is that in-sewer sediment resuspension is an important process to consider with regard to the efficacy of best management practices aimed at reducing extreme loads and concentrations. Rain gardens were less effective for large events, which are of greater importance for drinking water sources. These practices could increase peak instantaneous loads as a result of greater in-sewer resuspension during large events. Multiple interventions would be required to achieve the objectives of reducing the number, total volumes and peak contaminant loads of overflows upstream of drinking water intakes.


Madoux-Humery A.-S.,Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal | Dorner S.,Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal | Sauve S.,University of Montréal | Aboulfadl K.,University of Montréal | And 3 more authors.
Water Research | Year: 2013

A monitoring program was initiated for two sewage outfalls (OA and OB) with different land uses (mainly residential versus institutional) over the course of a year. Eleven CSO events resulting from fall and summer precipitations and a mixture of snowmelt and precipitation in late winter and early spring were monitored. Median concentrations measured in CSOs were 1.5×106Escherichia coli/100mL, 136.0mg/L of Total Suspended Solids (TSS), 4599.0ng/L of caffeine (CAF), 158.9ng/L of carbamazepine (CBZ), in outfall OA and 5.1×104E. coli/100mL, 167.0mg TSS/L, 300.8ng CAF/L, 4.1ng CBZ/L, in outfall OB. Concentration dynamics in CSOs were mostly related to the dilution by stormwater and the time of day of the onset of overflows. Snowmelt was identified as a critical period with regards to the protection of drinking water sources given the high contaminant concentrations and long duration of events in addition to a lack of restrictions on overflows during this period. Correlations among measured parameters reflected the origins and transport pathways of the contaminants, with E. coli being correlated with CBZ. TSS were not correlated with E. coli because E. coli was found to be mostly associated with raw sewage whereas TSS were additionally from the resuspension of in-sewer deposits and surface runoff. In receiving waters, E. coli remained the best indicator of fecal contamination in strongly diluted water samples as compared to WWMPs because WWMPs can be diluted to below their detection limits. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Madoux-Humery A.-S.,Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal | Dorner S.,Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal | Sauve S.,University of Montréal | Aboulfadl K.,University of Montréal | And 3 more authors.
Water Research | Year: 2016

This study was set out to investigate the impacts of Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs) on the microbiological water quality of a river used as a source of drinking water treatment plants. Escherichia coli concentrations were monitored at various stations of a river segment located in the Greater Montreal Area including two Drinking Water Intakes (DWIs) in different weather conditions (dry weather and wet weather (precipitation and snowmelt period)). Long-term monitoring data (2002-2011) at DWIs revealed good microbiological water quality with E. coli median concentrations of 20 and 30 CFU/100 mL for DWI-1 and DWI-2 respectively. However, E. coli concentration peaks reached up to 510 and 1000 CFU/100 mL for both DWIs respectively. Statistical Process Control (SPC) analysis allowed the identification of E. coli concentration peaks in almost a decade of routine monitoring data at DWIs. Almost 80% of these concentrations were linked to CSO discharges caused by precipitation exceeding 10 mm or spring snowmelt. Dry weather monitoring confirmed good microbiological water quality. Wet weather monitoring showed an increase of approximately 1.5 log of E. coli concentrations at DWIs. Cumulative impacts of CSO discharges were quantified at the river center with an increase of approximately 0.5 log of E. coli concentrations. Caffeine (CAF) was tested as a potential chemical indicator of CSO discharges in the river and CAF concentrations fell within the range of previous measurements performed for surface waters in the same area (~20 ng/L). However, no significant differences were observed between CAF concentrations in dry and wet weather, as the dilution potential of the river was too high. CSO event based monitoring demonstrated that current bi-monthly or weekly compliance monitoring at DWIs underestimate E. coli concentrations entering DWIs and thus, should not be used to quantify the risk at DWIs. High frequency event-based monitoring is a desirable approach to establish the importance and duration of E. coli peak concentrations entering DWIs. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal, Free University of Colombia and City of Laval
Type: | Journal: Journal of environmental management | Year: 2016

The quality of a drinking water source depends largely on upstream contaminant discharges. Sewer overflows can have a large influence on downstream drinking water intakes as they discharge untreated or partially treated wastewaters that may be contaminated with pathogens. This study focuses on the quantification of Escherichia coli discharges from combined sewer overflows (CSOs) and the dispersion and diffusion in receiving waters in order to prioritize actions for source water protection. E. coli concentrations from CSOs were estimated from monitoring data at a series of overflow structures and then applied to the 42 active overflow structures between 2009 and 2012 using a simple relationship based upon the population within the drainage network. From these estimates, a transport-dispersion model was calibrated with data from a monitoring program from both overflow structures and downstream drinking water intakes. The model was validated with 15 extreme events such as a large number of overflows (n > 8) or high concentrations at drinking water intakes. Model results demonstrated the importance of the cumulative effects of CSOs on the degradation of water quality downstream. However, permits are typically issued on a discharge point basis and do not consider cumulative effects. Source water protection plans must consider the cumulative effects of discharges and their concentrations because the simultaneous discharge of multiple overflows can lead to elevated E. coli concentrations at a drinking water intake. In addition, some CSOs have a disproportionate impact on peak concentrations at drinking water intakes. As such, it is recommended that the management of CSOs move away from frequency based permitting at the discharge point to focus on the development of comprehensive strategies to reduce cumulative and peak discharges from CSOs upstream of drinking water intakes.


PubMed | Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal, University of Montréal, Free University of Colombia and City of Laval
Type: | Journal: Water research | Year: 2016

This study was set out to investigate the impacts of Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs) on the microbiological water quality of a river used as a source of drinking water treatment plants. Escherichia coli concentrations were monitored at various stations of a river segment located in the Greater Montreal Area including two Drinking Water Intakes (DWIs) in different weather conditions (dry weather and wet weather (precipitation and snowmelt period)). Long-term monitoring data (2002-2011) at DWIs revealed good microbiological water quality with E.coli median concentrations of 20 and 30CFU/100mL for DWI-1 and DWI-2 respectively. However, E.coli concentration peaks reached up to 510 and 1000CFU/100mL for both DWIs respectively. Statistical Process Control (SPC) analysis allowed the identification of E.coli concentration peaks in almost a decade of routine monitoring data at DWIs. Almost 80% of these concentrations were linked to CSO discharges caused by precipitation exceeding 10mm or spring snowmelt. Dry weather monitoring confirmed good microbiological water quality. Wet weather monitoring showed an increase of approximately 1.5 log of E.coli concentrations at DWIs. Cumulative impacts of CSO discharges were quantified at the river center with an increase of approximately 0.5 log of E.coli concentrations. Caffeine (CAF) was tested as a potential chemical indicator of CSO discharges in the river and CAF concentrations fell within the range of previous measurements performed for surface waters in the same area (20ng/L). However, no significant differences were observed between CAF concentrations in dry and wet weather, as the dilution potential of the river was too high. CSO event based monitoring demonstrated that current bi-monthly or weekly compliance monitoring at DWIs underestimate E.coli concentrations entering DWIs and thus, should not be used to quantify the risk at DWIs. High frequency event-based monitoring is a desirable approach to establish the importance and duration of E.coli peak concentrations entering DWIs.

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