The City of Helsinki

Finland

The City of Helsinki

Finland
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News Article | September 14, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

HELSINKI--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Helsinki is the most liveable city in the Nordic region and the ninth best in the world. Safe and functional, Helsinki’s advantage as it competes to become the new home of the European Medicines Agency is precisely the quality of life here. Everyday life is easy, kids can walk to school, and there is lots of great urban and food culture. Helsinki is also appealing because of its peace and quiet, its proximity to nature and its overall cleanliness. The high quality of life in Helsinki is not just an impression; it has also been measured. In the latest index published by the Economist Intelligence Unit, Helsinki was ranked as the 9th most liveable city in the world and number one in the Nordic region. The index covered 140 cities altogether. Finland is consistently among the top performers in the PISA student assessment study. Helsinki has a world-class education system and numerous international schools. The city is also expanding its English-language daycare and education services. The European School of Helsinki is also adding capacity. The City of Helsinki’s vision is to be the most functional city in the world. Life in Helsinki is easy, because Finnish society is open and functional. For digital companies too, Helsinki is a positive, environmentally friendly and creative smart city even on the global scale. This impression is backed up by the quality of life indexes published by Mercer, The Economist and Monocle. Helsinki also has the most satisfied residents compared to any other European capital when it comes to the quality of their own lives, the place they live and the sports opportunities in their hometown. Helsinki is home to the European Chemicals Agency Another strength of Helsinki is that it is already home to the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA). The five hundred employees and directors of the agency appreciate the city’s efficiency, functionality, excellent transport infrastructure and the fact that everything in the city is nearby. The ECHA has the lowest turnover of employees of any EU agency, suggesting that people who come to Helsinki want to stay here. Combining work and free time here is straightforward. Helsinki is a perfect place for kids to grow up https://beta.myhelsinki.fi/en/work-and-study/work/helsinki-is-a-perfect-place-for-kids-to-grow-up


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

A new financing scheme is put forward for Guggenheim Helsinki museum construction and operation HELSINKI, FINLAND--(Marketwired - November 03, 2016) - The City of Helsinki and the support foundation for the proposed Guggenheim Helsinki museum have prepared a new proposal for establishing the museum. The proposal will be presented to City decision-makers for a decisive vote on project realization. The preparation of a new proposal was undertaken after the Finnish Government announced in connection of the fall 2016 budget talks that the Government would not finance the museum investment. At the same time, private funding for the project had reached record levels by Helsinki standards. "Our goal was to find a feasible plan that would not place the full financial burden of the museum construction on the City of Helsinki," says Ritva Viljanen, Helsinki Deputy Mayor for Cultural Affairs. She adds, "We have now found an approach to implement the museum project that allows us to present the matter to City decision-makers." The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation presented a proposal for a Guggenheim Helsinki museum to the City of Helsinki in 2011. The proposal was voted down by the Helsinki City Board in 2012, after which the Guggenheim Foundation made a new proposal and co-organized and financed a design competition for the museum building held in 2014-2015. The winning design was by Moreau Kusunoki Architects. The estimated construction cost of the Guggenheim Helsinki museum is EUR 130 million. According to the new financing scheme, the City of Helsinki would fund the construction with up to EUR 80 million and the Guggenheim Helsinki Supporting Foundation with EUR 15 million, while the rest would come from private sources. The City of Helsinki would be the principal owner of the museum building and cover the costs incurred by the building - approximately EUR 6.5 million per year - but would not finance the museum's operation in any other way. The museum operation would be financed by the Supporting Foundation with its income, private funding, and the annual Finnish Government subsidy for museums. The Supporting Foundation would also cover the total cost of a EUR 35 million loan taken for the construction by a real estate company that would be founded by the City and the Supporting Foundation for the museum. Private funding would also be used to cover the license and administrative fees paid to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, which the foundation has lowered from the original US$ 30 to US$ 20 million over 20 years. In the new proposal, the City's share of ownership in the museum building would be markedly higher than in the plan negotiated with the Finnish Government, although the City's investment sum would be the same. Private funding secured by the Guggenheim Helsinki Supporting Foundation is now markedly higher than in earlier proposals, totaling EUR 66.4 million. Ms. Viljanen comments, "This is an exceptional project: no other cultural project in Helsinki has attracted this much private funding." According to an economic impact analysis, the museum would boost tourism and employment and increase the City's tax income. The new proposal will be considered by the Helsinki City Board on November 7, 2016, for presentation to the City Council. The City Board is the administrative body in the Helsinki City government that presents matters to the City Council, which is the City's highest decision-making body. If the City Council approves the museum project, construction could begin in 2019 and the museum could open in 2021 at the earliest. Documents and/or Photos available for this release: To view supporting documents and/or photos, go to www.enr-corp.com/pressroom and enter Release ID: 406052


Kielenniva N.,The City of Helsinki | Antikainen R.,Finnish Environment Institute | Sorvari J.,Finnish Environment Institute
Journal of Environmental Management | Year: 2012

Eco-efficiency and sustainable development are the key environmental topics and goals for today's society that we should strive for in all activities, including contaminated soil management (CSM). However, particularly at the regional level, CSM is studied to a lesser extent from this perspective and practical means to monitor and assess sustainability or eco-efficiency are not widely available. This study aims to fill this gap by developing indicators to measure and monitor the development of regional eco-efficiency of CSM. The indicators can be used to support decision-making at the regional level since many CSM decisions, such as prioritisation of sites and the number of soil treatment and storing facilities, are made regionally. To start with, we surveyed the methods available for determining eco-efficiency and suitable indicators to monitor and measure the development of CSM regionally. We used life cycle analysis (LCA) and material flow analysis (MFA) to identify factors that the environmental indicators should cover, and also involved economic indicators. We ended up with a selection of 28 indicators, which can be classed into three different categories: background indicators, environmental indicators and economic indicators. We further demonstrated the use of the indicators by applying data from three different regions in Finland, and evaluated their suitability. On the basis of the results we recommended 15 indicators for continuous follow-up and decision-making purposes. Even though these indicators are suitable for monitoring and measuring the eco-efficiency of CSM at the regional level, unfortunately we found several data gaps related to the actual remediation projects which impede their use in practice. The data collection practices therefore need to be regionally developed. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | The City of Helsinki
Type: | Journal: Journal of environmental management | Year: 2012

Eco-efficiency and sustainable development are the key environmental topics and goals for todays society that we should strive for in all activities, including contaminated soil management (CSM). However, particularly at the regional level, CSM is studied to a lesser extent from this perspective and practical means to monitor and assess sustainability or eco-efficiency are not widely available. This study aims to fill this gap by developing indicators to measure and monitor the development of regional eco-efficiency of CSM. The indicators can be used to support decision-making at the regional level since many CSM decisions, such as prioritisation of sites and the number of soil treatment and storing facilities, are made regionally. To start with, we surveyed the methods available for determining eco-efficiency and suitable indicators to monitor and measure the development of CSM regionally. We used life cycle analysis (LCA) and material flow analysis (MFA) to identify factors that the environmental indicators should cover, and also involved economic indicators. We ended up with a selection of 28 indicators, which can be classed into three different categories: background indicators, environmental indicators and economic indicators. We further demonstrated the use of the indicators by applying data from three different regions in Finland, and evaluated their suitability. On the basis of the results we recommended 15 indicators for continuous follow-up and decision-making purposes. Even though these indicators are suitable for monitoring and measuring the eco-efficiency of CSM at the regional level, unfortunately we found several data gaps related to the actual remediation projects which impede their use in practice. The data collection practices therefore need to be regionally developed.


HELSINKI--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The City of Helsinki ha elaborado dos modelos municipales en 3D de próxima generación: un modelo de información municipal semántico e inteligente y otro modelo de malla de alta calidad visual. Estos modelos se basan en los métodos de medición, diseño y modelado de información municipal más recientes desarrollados en los últimos diez años. Helsinki es la primera ciudad del mundo que utilizará simultáneamente ambos modelos municipales en 3D. Están disponibles de forma l


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

HELSINKI--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The City of Helsinki has commissioned two next-generation 3D city models: a smart, semantic city information model and a visually high-quality reality mesh model. These models are based on the most recent measurement, modelling and city information model methods developed over the past ten years. Helsinki is the first city in the world to simultaneously utilise both 3D city models. They are available as open data. “The city information model is based on the open, global CityGML standard, and many open source code applications have been applied in the model work. This will bring benefits to tax-paying city inhabitants,” project manager, Mr Jarmo Suomisto from City of Helsinki emphasises. The versatile models enable the calculation and visualisation of city analyses, for example on the possibilities of alternative energy sources, greenhouse gas emissions and the environmental impact of traffic. The models can also be applied to the needs of businesses, tourism, navigation, rescue authorities, telecommunication network construction, building management and regional planning. The database-based smart city information model is suitable for advanced city analyses, and the data content in the model can be enriched without limit. Helsinki is the first Nordic city that has created a semantic CityCML 3D model of its entire area. The 3D reality mesh model has been produced from aerial photographs using computerised calculations. The model's advantage is its realistic nature. The reality mesh model is useful in online services. Helsinki is the first city in the world that makes the reality mesh model available for free use as open data. Helsinki has twelve pilot projects where city information models are being utilized:

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