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News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.engineeringnews.co.za

The extremely worrying water shortage in Cape Town is an indication that climate change is an issue that can simply not be ignored by engineers and city planners, Cape Town mayor Patricia de Lille has told consulting engineers in Cape Town. She told the International Federation of Consulting Engineers (FIDIC)-Group of African Member Associations (GAMA) conference on infrastructure that the drought was a perfect example of this. “We are facing the worst drought in 100 years. For three years in a row, we haven’t received our winter rainfall yet. The pattern of rain has changed as well. Instead of a week or two of soft rain, we have short bursts and thunderstorms. Our storm water system cannot cope.” She said engineers needed to work on new methods. “The days are gone when we could rely on rain to fill up our dams. We need to redesign our storm water systems and look at other ways to collect water. “We want to move waste-treated water, but we only have one reticulation system. We need a second system where we can transport waste water.” De Lille further said the design of cities like Cape Town should be adapted to stop the urban sprawl, which had started during the apartheid era when people were pushed to the outskirts of the city. “Some people spend 40% of their income travelling to and from work. This must change.” The mayor said transport was being tied in with urban development in Cape Town, while density was being considered. De Lille challenged government and the private sector to come up with new and creative ways to raise money for infrastructure in the current tight economic times. “I am sick and tired of hearing the continuous excuse that there’s no money for infrastructure. It’s not necessary as you can make a plan.” She said the city had released 6 ha of land under the unfinished bridges in the centre of the city. The land, which had not been used for over 40 years, would be released for development, on two conditions – that developers use it to build affordable housing or to reduce traffic congestion. She said the City of Cape Town had committed to invest R6-billion a year in infrastructure. Sixty per cent of this would be spent on new infrastructure, with 40% going to maintain old infrastructure.  It had also recently launched Green Bonds to fund specific projects from water meter installations and upgrading reservoirs to sewerage plants. “We should not have to rely so heavily on banks such as the African Development Bank and the BRICS bank, as those grants are conditional.” De Lille challenged African governments and business to change their approach. “Africa must realise that the world owes us nothing. We need to lead as Africans especially in our cities, as cities are the drivers of change. We have to do it ourselves and manage urbanization.” She also took a swipe at cities and governments that don’t follow up on international conferences, such as COP21, as well as their own plans. “Implementation must take place. We can’t write policies and do analysis year after year, and not implement.” The Mother City Mayor said Cape Town had made great connections with other African cities. More direct flights to Cape Town have also been laid on, including from cities such as Addis Ababa, Maputo and Luanda. GAMA is a member of FIDIC. The conference has attracted 250 delegates from 17 African countries.


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.engineeringnews.co.za

The City of Cape Town has set itself the goal of establishing Cape Town as a forward-looking, globally competitive business city, deputy mayor Ian Neilson said on Sunday. Cape Town already boasted some of South Africa’s largest food and beverage manufacturing companies, making the city a well-established hub for the sector, he said. According to the city’s economic performance indicators (EPIC) report for the fourth quarter of 2016, this was one of the few manufacturing industries in Cape Town that had a positive trade balance. As such, the sector was also an important earner of foreign exchange for the city. The city’s proximity to a vast and productive agricultural hinterland, an international port, a growing consumer population, and a relatively strong skills base made it a very competitive location in which to base food and beverage manufacturing operations, Neilson said. “The city has set itself the goal of establishing Cape Town as a forward-looking, globally competitive business city, which is one of our strategic priorities in the organisational development and transformation plan. We will continue to build an enabling environment for economic growth and job creation and foster a climate that is conducive for doing business in the city. “Exports by the food and beverage manufacturing industry have grown strongly over the past five years. This industry is also well placed to exploit the export opportunities that can be gained by a weak exchange rate. Additionally, the sector boasts the fastest growing employment rate out of all of the manufacturing industries,” Neilson said. The food and beverage manufacturing sector was the largest manufacturing sector by output, recording the highest growth rates in gross value add (3%) and employment (4.9%) over a ten-year period. Further, employment in the food manufacturing sector grew strongly at 6.1% year-on-year for the second quarter of 2016; Atlantis was home to one of only three wheat biscuit factories in the world; a strong cluster of spice and saucing companies were based locally; and the country’s three largest seafood companies had their headquarters and main production facilities located in the city. Cape Town was also home to two of the largest craft beer companies in the country; one of only two licence holders for bottling and distribution of Coca-Cola products in South Africa was based in Cape Town; a number of newer high-growth soft-drink producers had their operations were based there; and well established fruit juice manufacturers were also based in the city. Beverage exports from Cape Town grew by 21% between 2015 and 2016 and fish exports grew by 22.7%. “The industry can be considered as a comparative advantage industry for the city. There is a lot of scope for our food and beverage manufacturers to tap into the increasing demand for diversified, value-added food and beverage products,” Neilson said.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.engineeringnews.co.za

Despite dramatically reducing water consumption, the City of Cape Town is still in a severe situation, with dam levels dropping by the day. “We are well beyond the point that Gauteng was at when it declared a disaster,” City of Cape Town executive director of informal settlements, water and waste Gisela Kaiser told delegates at the African Utility Week. She said the city was doing all it could to bring down water consumption among its four-million residents. Water restrictions have been in place since 2015, and have been tightened further this week. “We are experiencing the worst drought in Cape Town’s recorded history of more than 100 years. Meteorologists have warned that the coming winter will be just as dry as the last two years. Gone are the days of persistent drizzle lasting just over a week,” said Kaiser. She indicated that timing had not been on the side of the city authorities, as additional water supply schemes for the region were deferred before the drought took hold. “The decision to defer plans for supply schemes was followed by exceptionally low rainfall. To predict the future is not foolproof. When long-term water planning is undertaken, it’s based on historical water patterns.” At the time, she said, it was not practical to “set aside billions of rands for an alternative scheme when there are more pressing needs in the country.” “Even if money were no object, there is no way that an alternative supply scheme, such as desalination, would be built in time to compensate for a drought.” So far, water restrictions had led to Capetonians saving the equivalent of the Wemmershoek dam or the equivalent of 23 600 Olympic-size swimming pools. Kaiser said by the end of the month, the city aimed to save the equivalent of the Berg River dam. “We have managed to save a third of our usual water consumption year-on-year. Despite population growth, we’ve had flat-line water consumption growth since 2000.” Water losses, partly through burst and leaking pipes, have also been reduced, although not enough. Pipe bursts have been halved, while there have been extensive pipe replacement programmes. “Water losses are down from 25% in 2009 to below 15% today.” Kaiser said the city had communicated with residents through social and mainstream media, on posters, brochures and every way possible to let them know how to use less water. She said the most effective messaging had been to flash the position of dam levels on signs on major roads. “This got people’s attention.” “The water crisis is challenging the city and its residents to think differently about water, now and into the future. It is above all an opportunity to completely shift our ideas and behaviour about a resource we have taken for granted. Aside from that, we are waiting for a miracle.” Kaiser called on Cape Town residents and visitors to the city to opt for a quick shower over a bath. “An average bath uses 200 l of water – double the amount of water residents have now been asked to use on an average day.”


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.engineeringnews.co.za

Water levels are continuing to drop gradually despite recent good rains that have been experienced in some parts of South Africa. The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) on Tuesday said the national water storage decreased from 72.9% last week to 72.7% this week. This was, however, still above the 54% recorded at this time last year. “Water users are urged to adhere to water restriction measures imposed by their respective municipalities,” the DWS said, noting that low dam levels in the Western Cape were of particular concern. The Cape Town Dams System, which has six dams serving mainly the City of Cape Town (CoC), decreased to 20.8% this week from 21.7% last week and was below the 30.8% at the same time last year. “It is important to note that South Africa is a water scarce country and the current water that we have should be used wisely,” the DWS stated.


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.engineeringnews.co.za

The water crisis in the Western Cape will lead to war and deaths unless urgent steps are taken soon, Congress of South African Trade Union (Cosatu) said on Wednesday. "We know that we have asked for you to step down, but whilst you are still president we bring this urgent matter to your attention," the trade union said in a short open letter to President Jacob Zuma. "The rich have money to buy bottled water, whilst the poor will be the first to start dying of thirst, because there is no supply or disaster plan for the end of July to get water to communities when taps run dry." The City of Cape Town announced that it wanted to introduce Level 4 water restrictions which would ban all use of municipal water for outside and nonessential use and limit residents to 100 l of water per person per day. This means no car washing, watering of gardens, irrigation with municipal drinking water at all, and no new golf courses or sports fields to be built unless they will be watered with nonpotable water. Should Council approve the restrictions, it will be in effect from June 1. FINES The Level 3 restrictions had allowed watering by watering can for an hour on Tuesday and Saturday, but that would be out of bounds if the Level 4 restrictions are passed. Filling and topping up swimming pools would also be prohibited. The Level 4 restrictions would also come with sanitation tips such as using old bath water to fill the toilet cistern and not flushing each time the toilet is used. ''Use water only for drinking, cooking and essential washing,'' a statement from the city said. It wants every Capetonian to use no more than an overall 100 l of water a day. The proposed fines for overuse still have to be approved by the council and the Chief Magistrate, but they range between R1 000 and R5 000 for a spot fine. The city was also continuing with its pressure reduction programmes across the metro which forcibly reduces supply at a given time. Other emergency interventions are under way, and if required, the city will start to implement a lifeline supply of water across the metro. The city will announce the Level 4 restrictions if they are approved by council.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.engineeringnews.co.za

Water use in Cape Town must be brought down by 100-million litres immediately, the City of Cape Town said in a statement on Monday. “Dam storage levels are now at 20.7%, which is 0.7% down from a week ago. With the last 10% of a dam’s water mostly not being usable, dam levels are effectively at 10.7%. “Consumption disappointingly remains at 93-million litres above the consumption target of 600-million litres,” mayoral committee member for Informal Settlements, Water and Waste Services and Energy, councillor Xanthea Limberg, said. Limberg said, “We are asking all water users to reduce their water usage to 100 litres per person per day.” Cape Town was experiencing the harsh impact of climate change, with reduced annual average rainfall and abnormal water patterns. No sufficient rain is predicted for the next three weeks. The city has allocated R22m to employ additional staff for its first-line response teams who are deployed to attend to water faults reported to its call centre. Approximately 75 additional staff members have been employed to improve the city’s response time to water complaints. Since the implementation of water restrictions, the city’s call centre and first-line response teams have been inundated with calls about water faults and leaks. The city’s staff attend to approximately 800 water and sanitation complaints related to water leaks and faults on a daily basis and teams are doing all they can to expedite their response to water complaints. “We continue to use all current means to drive down consumption. There are some residents in this city who have already cut their consumption down to one-third of what they used to use, but others have seemingly taken the decision that their needs are more important than anyone else’s. “We will continue to crack down on those water users. Every single water user must use less than 100 litres per person per day. This is not negotiable," said Limberg. Residents have been urged to use water solely for drinking, washing and cooking and to only flush the toilet when necessary. They are also encouraged to take shorter showers. “Defrost food in the fridge or naturally rather than placing it under running water, use a cup instead of running taps in the bathroom or kitchen for brushing teeth, shaving, drinking and wait for a full load before running washing machines and dishwashers. The rinse water from some washing machines can be reused for the next wash cycle.” The city has also urged residents to check for leaks properly. “One leaking toilet wastes between 2 600 and 13 000 litres per month, depending on the flow rate of the leak. A leaking tap wastes between 400 and 2 600 litres per month,” Limberg said. For more information and to report contraventions of water restrictions, email water@capetown.gov.za or send send an SMS to 31373.


The City of Cape Town will present its Voortrekker Road Corridor: Strategy and Investment Plan at the upcoming African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit at the Mother City’s CTICC from 2-3 November. Cape Town, South Africa, October 29, 2016 --( The presentation, which is open to industry professionals, forms part of an exciting line-up of high-level representatives from leading African cities, including Cape Town, Johannesburg, Nairobi, Dar es Salaam, Lusaka and Kampala, who will showcase the investment and development opportunities offered by their cities’ Urban Development Plans or specific major infrastructure projects. “The City has spent in excess of R300-million on infrastructure investments,” says Councillor van der Merwe, “which are directly serving the corridor and significantly more on bulk infrastructure that contributes towards the corridor. One of the key infrastructure investments that we are making is providing financing to PRASA to undertake a study to develop a plan of improvements/upgrades to this important rail corridor.” He foresees the main challenges to be “urban management, which includes crime, grime and maintenance, which is a key issue within the corridor. Solving this challenge is key to attracting investors to the area. We see the solution to this challenge emanating from the continuation and further development of partnerships between the City, the Greater Tygerberg Partnership, city improvement districts, land owners, business operators, civic organisations and residents. In addition to this partnership approach, we are working with the City improvement districts and the Greater Tygerberg Partnership to provide additional services in key locations.” African city of the future More headline speakers at the African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit that will also focus on key case studies of visionary city planning, investment opportunities in the commercial and residential real estate sector, the African city of the future and the challenges of urbanisation are: - Tim Harris, CEO, WESGRO - Jean Pierre Elong Mbassi, Secretary General, UCLG-A* - Lord Mayor, Hon. Isaya Mwita Charles, Dar es Salaam - Lekwalo Mosienyane, Director, Business Botswana - Mokena Makeka, Founder & Principal, Makeka Design Lab, South Africa - Kecia Rust, Director & Founder, Centre for Affordable Housing Finance in Africa / Secretariat to the African Union for Housing Finance, UN-Habitat, South Africa - Amine Turki, Secretary General, Africa Union of Architects, Tunisia - Professor Vanessa Watson, School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics, University of Cape *UCLG-A: United Cities and Local Governments of Africa The African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit will gather the full spectrum of the continent’s real estate sector and will assist African cities and governments to secure international investment for commercial real estate development and infrastructure projects that will contribute to Urban Development Plans (UDPs). The African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit is organised by Spintelligent, leading Cape Town-based trade exhibition and conference organiser, and the African office of Clarion Events Ltd, based in the UK. Spintelligent is well known for organising exhibitions and conferences across the continent in the infrastructure, energy, mining, agriculture and education sectors. Longstanding flagship events by Spintelligent include African Utility Week, East African Power Industry Convention (EAPIC), West African Power Industry Convention (WAPIC), Agritech Expo, DRC Mining Week and EduWeek. UCLG Africa The UCLG Africa is the patron of the upcoming African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit in Cape Town. The UCLG AFRICA is the umbrella organisation and the united voice and representative of local government in Africa. It is an institution that gathers 40 national associations of local governments from all regions of Africa as well as the 2000 cities that have more than 100.000 inhabitants. Therefore UCLG AFRICA represents nearly 350 million Africans citizens. Dates for African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit 2016: Showcase and conference: 2-3 November 2016 Opening session: 09h00, 2 November, 2016 Location: CTICC, Cape Town, South Africa Cape Town, South Africa, October 29, 2016 --( PR.com )-- “The Voortrekker Road Corridor offers a unique opportunity to invest in the urban core of Cape Town in one of its most important transit-oriented development corridors, taking advantage of the central location and extensive public transport infrastructure.” – this is according to Councillor Johan van der Merwe, the City of Cape Town’s Mayoral Committee Member for Energy, Environmental and Spatial Planning. The City of Cape Town will present its Voortrekker Road Corridor: Strategy and Investment Plan at the upcoming African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit at the Mother City’s CTICC from 2-3 November.The presentation, which is open to industry professionals, forms part of an exciting line-up of high-level representatives from leading African cities, including Cape Town, Johannesburg, Nairobi, Dar es Salaam, Lusaka and Kampala, who will showcase the investment and development opportunities offered by their cities’ Urban Development Plans or specific major infrastructure projects.“The City has spent in excess of R300-million on infrastructure investments,” says Councillor van der Merwe, “which are directly serving the corridor and significantly more on bulk infrastructure that contributes towards the corridor. One of the key infrastructure investments that we are making is providing financing to PRASA to undertake a study to develop a plan of improvements/upgrades to this important rail corridor.”He foresees the main challenges to be “urban management, which includes crime, grime and maintenance, which is a key issue within the corridor. Solving this challenge is key to attracting investors to the area. We see the solution to this challenge emanating from the continuation and further development of partnerships between the City, the Greater Tygerberg Partnership, city improvement districts, land owners, business operators, civic organisations and residents. In addition to this partnership approach, we are working with the City improvement districts and the Greater Tygerberg Partnership to provide additional services in key locations.”African city of the futureMore headline speakers at the African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit that will also focus on key case studies of visionary city planning, investment opportunities in the commercial and residential real estate sector, the African city of the future and the challenges of urbanisation are:- Tim Harris, CEO, WESGRO- Jean Pierre Elong Mbassi, Secretary General, UCLG-A*- Lord Mayor, Hon. Isaya Mwita Charles, Dar es Salaam- Lekwalo Mosienyane, Director, Business Botswana- Mokena Makeka, Founder & Principal, Makeka Design Lab, South Africa- Kecia Rust, Director & Founder, Centre for Affordable Housing Finance in Africa / Secretariat to the African Union for Housing Finance, UN-Habitat, South Africa- Amine Turki, Secretary General, Africa Union of Architects, Tunisia- Professor Vanessa Watson, School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics, University of Cape*UCLG-A: United Cities and Local Governments of AfricaThe African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit will gather the full spectrum of the continent’s real estate sector and will assist African cities and governments to secure international investment for commercial real estate development and infrastructure projects that will contribute to Urban Development Plans (UDPs).The African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit is organised by Spintelligent, leading Cape Town-based trade exhibition and conference organiser, and the African office of Clarion Events Ltd, based in the UK.Spintelligent is well known for organising exhibitions and conferences across the continent in the infrastructure, energy, mining, agriculture and education sectors. Longstanding flagship events by Spintelligent include African Utility Week, East African Power Industry Convention (EAPIC), West African Power Industry Convention (WAPIC), Agritech Expo, DRC Mining Week and EduWeek.UCLG AfricaThe UCLG Africa is the patron of the upcoming African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit in Cape Town. The UCLG AFRICA is the umbrella organisation and the united voice and representative of local government in Africa. It is an institution that gathers 40 national associations of local governments from all regions of Africa as well as the 2000 cities that have more than 100.000 inhabitants. Therefore UCLG AFRICA represents nearly 350 million Africans citizens.Dates for African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit 2016:Showcase and conference: 2-3 November 2016Opening session: 09h00, 2 November, 2016Location: CTICC, Cape Town, South Africa Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit


“The first African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit in Cape Town provided an innovative space for leading built environment professionals to engage with experts, projects, investors and practitioners from all over the continent. We are confident that the summit will grow to become the leading meeting point of the real estate and infrastructure industries in Africa." This is according to Tim Harris, CEO of Wesgro, who was a speaker and session facilitator at the summit. Cape Town, South Africa, November 25, 2016 --( More than 300 sector experts gathered for the inaugural two-day summit earlier this month with interactive sessions that focused on key case studies of visionary city planning, investment opportunities in the commercial and residential real estate sectors across the continent, the African city of the future and the challenges of urbanisation. Innovative development projects from Cape Town, Johannesburg, Addis Ababa, Kigali, Lusaka, Kampala and the Taparura project in Tunisia were showcased. A key finding of the conference was that Africa’s cities are facing an urban ‘polycrisis’ and that there is a need for a new urban agenda and an opportunity for innovative solutions to address urbanisation challenges. Expert speaker highlights at the African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit included: “Africa is on the brink of great change. It is the fastest urbanising region in the world, with around 400 million people expected to migrate from rural areas to cities by 2050. As more and more people move to our cities in search of a better life, it is critical that we provide effective and sustainable infrastructure to meet their needs.” - Alderman Ian Neilson, City of Cape Town’s Executive Deputy Mayor “New forms of urban planning in African cities seem to be dedicated to transforming them into replicas of Dubai, Shanghai and Singapore. The main challenge of the real estate sector on the continent currently is to find approaches to real estate development which are not only for the wealthy, and which find architectural and planning approaches which are not simplistic ‘cut and pastes’ of cities elsewhere in the world.” - Prof Vanessa Watson, of the School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics, University of Cape Town “The Voortrekker Road Corridor offers a unique opportunity to invest in the urban core of Cape Town in one of its most important transit-oriented development corridors, taking advantage of the central location and extensive public transport infrastructure.” – Councillor Johan van der Merwe, the City of Cape Town’s Mayoral Committee Member for Energy, Environmental and Spatial Planning. “Arup recently completed a transit orientated development masterplan for the light rail transit system in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The project focused on realising the economic potential of the key stations along the light rail system; while regenerating the city, thereby making use of hard infrastructure systems to unlock multiple gains that improve the social and economic prosperity of citizens.” - Nico Venter, Associate Director at Arup’s Johannesburg Office, responsible for the Urban Design and Cities Business in South Africa. “We passionately believe that Africa is a continent of opportunity. With improving economies, rising populations, rapid rates of urbanisation and burgeoning middle classes, some African cities are expected to grow between 70-100% in the next 15 years.” - Mr Jean-Pierre Elong Mbassi, Secretary General of the United Cities and Local Governments of Africa (UCLGA) – patron of the African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit. More key findings that emerged during the African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit included: - African countries need to adopt new development models designed to take advantage of urbanisation by facilitating structural transformation, creating jobs and addressing social inequality and poverty, while creating sustainable human settlements with equal opportunity for all. - The future of Africa is at stake and the future of Africa will be more and more linked to how cities are managed and the way they choose to contribute to African unity. - Careful, complex, thorough administrative management and pro-poor urban development will turn African cities into world-class cities, not design plans based on fantasy Dubai-esque city makeovers. Major infrastructure and building projects and opportunities on the continent featured at the African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit included: - Cape Town’s Voortrekker Corridor Road Integration Zone Strategy and Investment Plan - Joburg’s Corridors of Freedom for a people-centred city - Kimisange, Kicukiro 237 and Kicukiro 968 in Kigali, Rwanda - Transit Oriented Development in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia - The PDGML – General Master Plan for Luanda, Angola - Comprehensive Urban Development Plan (CUDP) for the City of Lusaka, Zambia - Kampala Physical Development Plan, Uganda - PARURA SFAX – The Master Plan for Taparura Project, Tunisia Cape Town, South Africa, November 25, 2016 --( PR.com )-- “The first African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit in Cape Town provided an innovative space for leading built environment professionals to engage with experts, projects, investors and practitioners from all over the continent. We are confident that the summit will grow to become the leading meeting point of the real estate and infrastructure industries in Africa." This is according to Tim Harris, CEO of Wesgro, who was a speaker and session facilitator at the summit.More than 300 sector experts gathered for the inaugural two-day summit earlier this month with interactive sessions that focused on key case studies of visionary city planning, investment opportunities in the commercial and residential real estate sectors across the continent, the African city of the future and the challenges of urbanisation. Innovative development projects from Cape Town, Johannesburg, Addis Ababa, Kigali, Lusaka, Kampala and the Taparura project in Tunisia were showcased.A key finding of the conference was that Africa’s cities are facing an urban ‘polycrisis’ and that there is a need for a new urban agenda and an opportunity for innovative solutions to address urbanisation challenges.Expert speaker highlights at the African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit included:“Africa is on the brink of great change. It is the fastest urbanising region in the world, with around 400 million people expected to migrate from rural areas to cities by 2050. As more and more people move to our cities in search of a better life, it is critical that we provide effective and sustainable infrastructure to meet their needs.”- Alderman Ian Neilson, City of Cape Town’s Executive Deputy Mayor“New forms of urban planning in African cities seem to be dedicated to transforming them into replicas of Dubai, Shanghai and Singapore. The main challenge of the real estate sector on the continent currently is to find approaches to real estate development which are not only for the wealthy, and which find architectural and planning approaches which are not simplistic ‘cut and pastes’ of cities elsewhere in the world.”- Prof Vanessa Watson, of the School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics, University of Cape Town“The Voortrekker Road Corridor offers a unique opportunity to invest in the urban core of Cape Town in one of its most important transit-oriented development corridors, taking advantage of the central location and extensive public transport infrastructure.”– Councillor Johan van der Merwe, the City of Cape Town’s Mayoral Committee Member for Energy, Environmental and Spatial Planning.“Arup recently completed a transit orientated development masterplan for the light rail transit system in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The project focused on realising the economic potential of the key stations along the light rail system; while regenerating the city, thereby making use of hard infrastructure systems to unlock multiple gains that improve the social and economic prosperity of citizens.”- Nico Venter, Associate Director at Arup’s Johannesburg Office, responsible for the Urban Design and Cities Business in South Africa.“We passionately believe that Africa is a continent of opportunity. With improving economies, rising populations, rapid rates of urbanisation and burgeoning middle classes, some African cities are expected to grow between 70-100% in the next 15 years.”- Mr Jean-Pierre Elong Mbassi, Secretary General of the United Cities and Local Governments of Africa (UCLGA) – patron of the African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit.More key findings that emerged during the African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit included:- African countries need to adopt new development models designed to takeadvantage of urbanisation by facilitating structural transformation, creating jobs and addressing social inequality and poverty, while creating sustainable human settlements with equal opportunity for all.- The future of Africa is at stake and the future of Africa will be more and more linked to how cities are managed and the way they choose to contribute to African unity.- Careful, complex, thorough administrative management and pro-poor urban development will turn African cities into world-class cities, not design plans based on fantasy Dubai-esque city makeovers.Major infrastructure and building projects and opportunities on the continent featured at the African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit included:- Cape Town’s Voortrekker Corridor Road Integration Zone Strategy and Investment Plan- Joburg’s Corridors of Freedom for a people-centred city- Kimisange, Kicukiro 237 and Kicukiro 968 in Kigali, Rwanda- Transit Oriented Development in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia- The PDGML – General Master Plan for Luanda, Angola- Comprehensive Urban Development Plan (CUDP) for the City of Lusaka, Zambia- Kampala Physical Development Plan, Uganda- PARURA SFAX – The Master Plan for Taparura Project, Tunisia Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit


News Article | November 1, 2016
Site: www.prlog.org

Swisatec Architects and Project Managers of Africa's first green village: Blue Rock Village, believe in the reality of electric vehicles at Blue Rock Village and the greater City of Cape Town.


Swisatec: South Africa’s New Promise and Africa’s Financial Gateway. The Dollar House. The Dollar House is in the heart of Helderberg area, positioned as a highly prestigious business location and home to many international financial institutions, it’s a place of steel and glass, of suits and speed and the habit of planning for the future rather than rambling on about the past. Cape Town, South Africa, November 10, 2016 --( The financial hub will keep true to the Blue Rock Village environmental objective and cost saving systems such as running the building on solar generated power, daylight-controlled lighting systems, water-efficient fittings, rain-water harvesting system, lifts will be installed with VVVF sleep mode for energy saving, full insulation and double glazed windows. The Dollar House will house financial institutions such as banks, law firms, financial consultants, financial advisors, and wealth management firms. With an expected wealth of financial institutions and head offices, the Dollar House will soon be the next financial hub of Cape Town and the driver of South Africa’s economy. A business hub doesn’t become a business hub without properly accommodating the Businessman-Blue Rock Village shines in this respect. A five-star Blue Rock Hotel and 80 executive apartments above The Dollar House dominate the landscape offering world-class amenities catering to business travellers. Blue Rock Village further offers the esteemed conferencing centre with a capacity to host over 500 executives. Linked to the conferencing centre is a 10,000 square meter Lifestyle exhibition street designed to host conferences, exhibitions, interactive events such product launch, concerts or music festivals. Next to The Dollar House is the Santa Luzia Lifestyle centre, a vibrant hub of Cape life where sophistication and chic collide. Its universal appeal makes it one of Cape Town’s foremost attraction. The lifestyle centre adds more value to The Dollar House as it offers an array of café’s, high-end restaurants, boutique shops, creative art studios i.e. pottery and painting, fresh produce markets, bakery shops, doctors centre, clinic, and professional office space for small to medium business. Embracing their car free living concept, all vehicles will be parked underground. To counter the frenzied Cape Town traffic, Swisatec is set to discuss with the City of Cape Town and PRASA on the expansion of PRASA business train, a construction of a new train station just opposite the village and the expansion of the MyCiti bus service in order to provide business travellers, tourist and locals with reliable public transport service that makes doing business at The Dollar House a breeze. Swisatec also envisions a helicopter shuttle from Blue Rock Village to the Cape Town International airport. What makes The Dollar House more special is the ideal location, surrounded by award winning wine farms, sandy beaches of Gordons Bay, Strand and False Bay with more than 20 famous golf ranges in close proximity to the village. The Dollar House is indeed South Africa’s new promise and Africa’s financial gate way. Construction is envisioned to begin in 2017. Blue Rock Village phase one: Giovanni Luxury Apartments will be officially on sale in August. For more information and reservation, please contact us on village@bluerock.co.za , call us on +27 21 300 1722 or visit our website on www.bluerockvillage.co.za Cape Town, South Africa, November 10, 2016 --( PR.com )-- Designed by renowned architectural firm Swisatec, The Dollar House will offer 40,000 square metres of prime office space, 600 metres long, designed to accommodate thousands of people daily, a true world class building and an iconic landmark.The financial hub will keep true to the Blue Rock Village environmental objective and cost saving systems such as running the building on solar generated power, daylight-controlled lighting systems, water-efficient fittings, rain-water harvesting system, lifts will be installed with VVVF sleep mode for energy saving, full insulation and double glazed windows.The Dollar House will house financial institutions such as banks, law firms, financial consultants, financial advisors, and wealth management firms. With an expected wealth of financial institutions and head offices, the Dollar House will soon be the next financial hub of Cape Town and the driver of South Africa’s economy.A business hub doesn’t become a business hub without properly accommodating the Businessman-Blue Rock Village shines in this respect.A five-star Blue Rock Hotel and 80 executive apartments above The Dollar House dominate the landscape offering world-class amenities catering to business travellers. Blue Rock Village further offers the esteemed conferencing centre with a capacity to host over 500 executives. Linked to the conferencing centre is a 10,000 square meter Lifestyle exhibition street designed to host conferences, exhibitions, interactive events such product launch, concerts or music festivals.Next to The Dollar House is the Santa Luzia Lifestyle centre, a vibrant hub of Cape life where sophistication and chic collide. Its universal appeal makes it one of Cape Town’s foremost attraction. The lifestyle centre adds more value to The Dollar House as it offers an array of café’s, high-end restaurants, boutique shops, creative art studios i.e. pottery and painting, fresh produce markets, bakery shops, doctors centre, clinic, and professional office space for small to medium business.Embracing their car free living concept, all vehicles will be parked underground. To counter the frenzied Cape Town traffic, Swisatec is set to discuss with the City of Cape Town and PRASA on the expansion of PRASA business train, a construction of a new train station just opposite the village and the expansion of the MyCiti bus service in order to provide business travellers, tourist and locals with reliable public transport service that makes doing business at The Dollar House a breeze. Swisatec also envisions a helicopter shuttle from Blue Rock Village to the Cape Town International airport.What makes The Dollar House more special is the ideal location, surrounded by award winning wine farms, sandy beaches of Gordons Bay, Strand and False Bay with more than 20 famous golf ranges in close proximity to the village.The Dollar House is indeed South Africa’s new promise and Africa’s financial gate way. Construction is envisioned to begin in 2017. Blue Rock Village phase one: Giovanni Luxury Apartments will be officially on sale in August.For more information and reservation, please contact us on village@bluerock.co.za , call us on +27 21 300 1722 or visit our website on www.bluerockvillage.co.za Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Blue Rock Village

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