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News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

The ability to adapt to changing commuting patterns and mobility needs not only helps individuals who rely on public transportation, but also helps cities become more livable. Innovative cities are preparing for a multimodal future that balances transit, biking, walking, and vehicles that may be on-demand and autonomous. They need the right tools to plan and react as their communities change and grow. "Public transit determines more about a person's life than almost any other factor. It determines which jobs they can hold and which family members they can reach. It determines how far they can go, and in turn, the freedom that they have. But there's a gap between where our public transit is and where it needs to be — resulting in lost opportunities for cities and the communities they serve." said Sam Hashemi, Co-Founder and CEO, Remix. "At Remix, we believe technology has the potential to dramatically improve public transportation. With this new round of funding, we will continue to invest in building a planning platform that helps transit agencies create opportunities for people of all incomes to live and work." "Remix's technology is a game-changer. Before Remix, it was impossible to test out potential transit solutions in real-time," said Todd Plesko, Vice President of Planning and Development, Dallas Area Rapid Transit. "With Remix, we can automatically visualize service and financial trade-offs and quickly evaluate how the proposed transit scenarios impact low income and minority populations. The ability to easily explain the impact of prospective improvements has helped streamline the public approval process." "We used Remix's web-based platform to analyze our current system and found it utterly groundbreaking. There is nothing else like it in the transit marketplace. It places many planning tools into one resourceful package, providing a useful and intuitive solution, that allows transit planners to reimagine the deployment of resources on the fly," said Jon Y. Nouchi, Deputy Director, Department of Transportation Services, City and County of Honolulu. "Before Remix, redesigning a few routes would have taken a few weeks, now it takes a few days." The Series A financing comes on the heels of exceptional momentum for Remix, which tripled its revenue in 2016. Over 200 cities in over 10 countries now use Remix. The company has helped approximately a quarter of all US transit systems optimize routes, impacting close to one billion transit trips per year. "Remix helps local governments improve the quality of urban life by reducing congestion and pollution and enhancing social mobility," said Aaref Hilaly, partner at Sequoia and Remix board member. "In two short years, we've already seen Remix have a major impact on public transit around the world." Remix helps transit agencies and local governments make cities more livable, with a mission to build a more equitable world by expanding access within it. Trusted by over 200 cities on four continents, the Remix team of transit planners and urbanists helps agencies reduce their transit planning timelines from months to days. Remix has raised a total of $12 million in venture funding from Sequoia, Y Combinator, and SV Angel. Headquartered in San Francisco with 45 employees, Remix was founded in 2014. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/remix-raises-10-million-in-series-a-funding-led-by-sequoia-300454374.html


Sadri A.,City and County of Honolulu | Barlaz M.A.,North Carolina State University | Hater G.R.,Waste Management Inc.
Waste Management and Research | Year: 2010

Laboratory-scale reactors containing mixtures of municipal solid waste and wastewater treatment biosolids were monitored to assess the effect of biosolids on refuse decomposition and on phosphorus (P) cycling and speciation among orthophosphate, acid-hydrolysable P, and organic P. The co-disposal of 10 to 20% (by wet weight) aerobically-digested biosolids with residential refuse was compatible with refuse decomposition although the biosolids did not increase either the maximum methane production rate or the cumulative yield, and did not reduce lag times to the onset of methane production. The results of this study indicated that dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) was the dominant dissolved P fraction throughout refuse decomposition and that it was negatively correlated with the methane production rate and pH (r2 = 0.35 for both). P was not found to limit methane production. Biosolids increased dissolved P as well as ammonia-N in some reactors, but this did not have a significant impact on maximum methane production rates. The maximum tolerated Na+ and K+ concentrations during active methane production were at least 4100 mg Na+ L-1 and 800 mg K+ L-1, respectively. © The Author (s), 2010.


Sadri A.,City and County of Honolulu | Staley B.F.,North Carolina State University | Barlaz M.A.,North Carolina State University | Xu F.,North Carolina State University | Hater G.R.,Waste Management Inc.
Waste Management | Year: 2010

Non-hazardous industrial process wastes are receiving increased interest from landfill owners, especially with respect to bioreactor operation. These wastes could benefit bioreactors as they represent sources of liquid, nutrients, and/or substrate as well as revenue. However, landfill operators should exercise caution in accepting these wastes, as some could have detrimental effects on refuse decomposition. In this research, the use of laboratory-scale tests to evaluate the effect of one such waste on refuse decomposition is demonstrated. The waste evaluated, referred to as burnt sugar, is an acidic byproduct of corn-based polylactic acid production and represents a source of readily-biodegradable carbon. Lactic acid was the primary constituent of the BS at 0.73 g/g and the COD was measured at 1230 mg COD/g. Testing protocols were adapted to address the specific concerns surrounding the material. Abiotic dissolution tests conducted at mesophilic temperatures indicated that the majority of the waste dissolved into leachate recirculated over a layer of the waste within several days. Abiotic mixing tests suggested that the waste would acidify refuse to pH 6.41 at a loading of 21.9 g/dry kg refuse. However, in biologically active tests, the refuse was able to convert loadings as high as 196.7 g/dry kg refuse to methane. As the loadings increased toward and beyond this level, pronounced detrimental effects to the refuse ecosystem were observed, including a decrease in pH, accumulation of volatile fatty acids and COD, and lag in methane production. The results suggested that actively decomposing refuse has the potential to attenuate relatively high loading of a rapidly degradable but acidic substrate. Nonetheless, caution in the implementation of a field program to accept rapidly biodegradable acidic wastes is critical. © 2009.


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

AUSTIN, Texas--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Fitch Ratings has affirmed its 'AA+' rating on the following bonds issued by the Board of Water Supply City and County of Honolulu, HI (BWS): --Approximately $225 million water system revenue bonds, series 2012A, 2014A and 2014B (taxable). The Rating Outlook is Stable. SECURITY The bonds are secured by net revenues of BWS's water system. KEY RATING DRIVERS STRONG FINANCIAL POSITION: Financial performance and liquidity are strong. Revenue growth has outpaced expen


Receive press releases from Synagro Technologies, Inc.: By Email Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell and Councilmember Joey Manahan Perform Blessing Ceremony Celebrating Commissioning of Second Digester at the Sand Island Wastewater Treatment Providing increased capacity for wastewater treatment & biosolids recycling, the new digester allows for continuous operation while accommodating regional development Honolulu, HI, November 12, 2016 --( Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell said “If we’re going to have the capacity for more people living in our city, we need a sister digester that provides that capacity, and also a redundancy, so if one of our digesters goes down, we have another one that continually processes our sludge.” Synagro began their successful public-private partnership with the CCH in 2002. At that time they realized they needed to expand and improve the collection and treatment of waste materials and move to a model of beneficial reuse and recycling. Synagro reviewed, analyzed and assessed several options for the City and County, jointly deciding that the best solution was anaerobic digestion, centrifuge dewatering and heat drying and pelletization. The resulting biogas from digestion is collected and beneficially used as a renewable energy source for heating of the digester and the drying of the biosolids product. The biosolids are converted into a commercial-grade, Class A "Exceptional Quality" fertilizer product for agricultural and commercial use on the island; providing a cost-effective and sustainable alternative to imported commercial fertilizer. The facility has successfully reduced the disposal of biosolids into the local landfill by 99% and provided a closed-loop, environmentally sustainable solution. Herb Hingley, Synagro Senior VP Facilities, stated, “We are proud to have furthered our partnership with the City and County of Honolulu to upgrade the infrastructure and further the objectives of growth, modernization, and recycling on the island. Our relationship over the past decade has been built on communication, economic growth for the community and commitment to partnering for a cleaner, greener world- we look forward to our future with CCH.” As an active member of Honolulu’s business community, Synagro is committed to its continuing partnership with the CCH to provide an environmentally safe and beneficial reuse solution for biosolids management on Oahu. About Synagro Founded in 1986, Synagro, www.synagro.com, provides a system of solutions for civic and commercial organizations that manages by-products to create new, environmentally compelling options. The Company’s reliable, lasting system transforms industrial and municipal waste into environmentally-sustainable resources that benefit our communities. As the largest recycler of organic by-products in the United States, Synagro uses best-in-class processes, from beneficial reuse to renewable energy that adhere to the strictest of environmental regulations to provide sustainable solutions for communities across the nation. Serving more than 600 municipal and industrial water and wastewater facilities throughout the U.S., the Company’s leading systems of by-product management services help municipalities of all sizes save money and meet environmental regulations. Follow us: http://twitter.com/synagro Like us: http://www.facebook.com/synagro Contact: Laura Perisse, VP Sales and Marketing lperisse@synagro.com Honolulu, HI, November 12, 2016 --( PR.com )-- Synagro Technologies, Inc., the nation’s largest recycler of organic residuals, celebrated the on-time and on-budget completion of the construction and commissioning of a second Egg-Shaped Digester at the City and County of Honolulu (CCH) Sand Island Wastewater Treatment Plant. The project, which broke ground in December of 2013, provides additional digestion capacity needed to manage the projected solids loading, while also improving the wastewater treatment facility’s reliability and redundancy.Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell said “If we’re going to have the capacity for more people living in our city, we need a sister digester that provides that capacity, and also a redundancy, so if one of our digesters goes down, we have another one that continually processes our sludge.”Synagro began their successful public-private partnership with the CCH in 2002. At that time they realized they needed to expand and improve the collection and treatment of waste materials and move to a model of beneficial reuse and recycling. Synagro reviewed, analyzed and assessed several options for the City and County, jointly deciding that the best solution was anaerobic digestion, centrifuge dewatering and heat drying and pelletization. The resulting biogas from digestion is collected and beneficially used as a renewable energy source for heating of the digester and the drying of the biosolids product. The biosolids are converted into a commercial-grade, Class A "Exceptional Quality" fertilizer product for agricultural and commercial use on the island; providing a cost-effective and sustainable alternative to imported commercial fertilizer. The facility has successfully reduced the disposal of biosolids into the local landfill by 99% and provided a closed-loop, environmentally sustainable solution.Herb Hingley, Synagro Senior VP Facilities, stated, “We are proud to have furthered our partnership with the City and County of Honolulu to upgrade the infrastructure and further the objectives of growth, modernization, and recycling on the island. Our relationship over the past decade has been built on communication, economic growth for the community and commitment to partnering for a cleaner, greener world- we look forward to our future with CCH.”As an active member of Honolulu’s business community, Synagro is committed to its continuing partnership with the CCH to provide an environmentally safe and beneficial reuse solution for biosolids management on Oahu.About SynagroFounded in 1986, Synagro, www.synagro.com, provides a system of solutions for civic and commercial organizations that manages by-products to create new, environmentally compelling options. The Company’s reliable, lasting system transforms industrial and municipal waste into environmentally-sustainable resources that benefit our communities. As the largest recycler of organic by-products in the United States, Synagro uses best-in-class processes, from beneficial reuse to renewable energy that adhere to the strictest of environmental regulations to provide sustainable solutions for communities across the nation. Serving more than 600 municipal and industrial water and wastewater facilities throughout the U.S., the Company’s leading systems of by-product management services help municipalities of all sizes save money and meet environmental regulations.Follow us: http://twitter.com/synagroLike us: http://www.facebook.com/synagroContact:Laura Perisse, VP Sales and Marketinglperisse@synagro.com Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Synagro Technologies, Inc.


Mishra S.,University of Hawaii at Manoa | Goebert D.,University of Hawaii at Manoa | Char E.,City and County of Honolulu | Dukes P.,City and County of Honolulu | Ahmed I.,University of Hawaii at Manoa
Emergency Medicine Journal | Year: 2010

Background: Exposure to traumatic stressors is potentially an integral part of the job for emergency medical services (EMS) personnel, placing them at risk for psychological distress and mental health problems. Study objective: The prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and post-traumatic stress symptoms was examined in a sample of EMS personnel in a multiethnic locality in Hawaii. Commonly encountered traumatic incidents at work were also assessed. Methods: The PTSD Check List-Civilian version was sent to 220 EMS personnel. The survey included questions on demographics, traumatic incidents at work, general stressors, coping methods and post-traumatic stress symptoms. Results 105 surveys were returned (48% response rate); 4% of respondents met clinical diagnostic criteria for PTSD, 1% met subclinical criteria for PTSD, 83% reported experiencing some symptoms but no PTSD and 12% had no symptoms. However, few had received treatment for these symptoms. Serious injury or death of a co-worker along with incidents involving children were considered very stressful. General work conditions also contributed to the overall stress levels. Most common coping strategies reported were positive reinterpretation (63%), seeking family and social support (59%) and awareness and venting of emotions (46%), with significant differences by ethnicity. Conclusion: EMS personnel are at high risk of experiencing post-traumatic stress symptoms. Early identification and treatment of potential stressors, psychiatric and medical problems is warranted and necessitates ongoing assessment and employee assistance programmes at the minimum.


Rhode M.P.,POW Inc | Goodhue W.W.,City and County of Honolulu | Stephan C.N.,POW Inc
Journal of Forensic Sciences | Year: 2012

Bone remodeling is a natural process that is potentially problematic for radiographic comparisons because it can occur after antemortem (AM) imaging, thus interfering with the comparability of AM and postmortem (PM) radiographs from the same individual. While the effects of age-related remodeling have been studied, limited attention has been given to trauma-related remodeling with respect to radiographic comparisons. This report adds to the latter topic by presenting a case of AM clavicle fracture that developed into a pseudo-arthrosis over a 12-month period prior to the individual's death. Even though remodeling was discernable along the fracture margins, adjacent skeletal features on the PM radiograph remained unaltered and constituted compelling evidence for the identification. This case illustrates the potential of using both normal and pathological anatomy concurrently to maximize the surety of findings from radiographic comparisons. 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A.


Kobayashi M.,City and County of Honolulu | Kobayashi M.,University of Hawaii at Manoa | Cohle S.D.,Laboratory Medicine
Cardiovascular Pathology | Year: 2016

Background Eosinophilic coronary periarteritis (ECPA) is a rare disease found in cases of sudden cardiac death due to coronary vasospasm or spontaneous coronary artery dissection. Currently, the etiology, pathogenesis, and pathophysiology of ECPA are unknown. Cases of ECPA with a history of allergic disorders are rare. Only one case of ECPA with tissue eosinophilia in another organ has been reported. Methods A 50-year-old male suddenly died after complaining of chest pain. An autopsy with histopathologic analysis was performed. Results A short segment of the left anterior descending artery had ECPA with dense eosinophilic inflammation of the adventitia and mild atherosclerosis. There were findings atypical of ECPA including mild focal eosinophilic infiltration of the intima and media associated with proliferation of vasa vasorum, fragmented internal and external elastic laminae, and fibrosis of the media. In addition, eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus without mucosal involvement was present. The eosinophilic inflammation of the coronary artery and esophagus was accompanied by an increased number of mast cells. Conclusions This case suggests that ECPA and atherosclerosis may act synergistically by induction of inflammation and vasa vasorum neovascularization. Vasa vasorum and mast cell infiltration may trigger vasospasm and spontaneous coronary artery dissection. Although concurrent tissue eosinophilia elsewhere is rarely observed in cases of ECPA, collective analysis of these cases may elucidate the etiology and pathophysiology of ECPA. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.


Liu C.C.,University of Hawaii at Manoa | Dai J.J.,City and County of Honolulu
Journal of the American Water Resources Association | Year: 2012

Basal aquifers, in which freshwater floats on top of saltwater, are the major freshwater supply for the Hawaiian Islands, as well as many other coastal regions around the world. Under unexploited or natural conditions, freshwater and the underlying seawater are separated by a relatively sharp interface located below mean sea level at a depth of about 40 times the hydraulic head. With forced draft, the hydraulic head of a basal aquifer would decline and the sharp interface would move up. It is a serious problem of seawater intrusion as huge amounts of freshwater storage is replaced by saltwater. Also, with forced draft, the sharp interface is replaced by a transition zone in which the salinity increases downward from freshwater to saltwater. As pumping continues, the transition zone expands. The desirable source-water salinity in Hawaii is about 2% of the seawater salinity. Therefore, the transition zone expansion is another serious problem of seawater intrusion. In this study, a robust analytical groundwater flow and salinity transport model (RAM2) was developed. RAM2 has a simple mathematical structure and its model parameters can be determined satisfactorily with the available field monitoring data. The usefulness of RAM2 as a viable management tool for coastal ground water management is demonstrated by applying it to determine the sustainable yield of the Pearl Harbor aquifer, a principal water supply source in Hawaii. © 2012 American Water Resources Association.


PubMed | City and County of Honolulu
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Waste management (New York, N.Y.) | Year: 2010

Non-hazardous industrial process wastes are receiving increased interest from landfill owners, especially with respect to bioreactor operation. These wastes could benefit bioreactors as they represent sources of liquid, nutrients, and/or substrate as well as revenue. However, landfill operators should exercise caution in accepting these wastes, as some could have detrimental effects on refuse decomposition. In this research, the use of laboratory-scale tests to evaluate the effect of one such waste on refuse decomposition is demonstrated. The waste evaluated, referred to as burnt sugar, is an acidic byproduct of corn-based polylactic acid production and represents a source of readily-biodegradable carbon. Lactic acid was the primary constituent of the BS at 0.73 g/g and the COD was measured at 1230 mg COD/g. Testing protocols were adapted to address the specific concerns surrounding the material. Abiotic dissolution tests conducted at mesophilic temperatures indicated that the majority of the waste dissolved into leachate recirculated over a layer of the waste within several days. Abiotic mixing tests suggested that the waste would acidify refuse to pH 6.41 at a loading of 21.9 g/dry kg refuse. However, in biologically active tests, the refuse was able to convert loadings as high as 196.7 g/dry kg refuse to methane. As the loadings increased toward and beyond this level, pronounced detrimental effects to the refuse ecosystem were observed, including a decrease in pH, accumulation of volatile fatty acids and COD, and lag in methane production. The results suggested that actively decomposing refuse has the potential to attenuate relatively high loading of a rapidly degradable but acidic substrate. Nonetheless, caution in the implementation of a field program to accept rapidly biodegradable acidic wastes is critical.

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