Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Germany

Rivero J.M.,National University of La Plata | Rivero J.M.,CONICET | Grigera J.,National University of La Plata | Rossi G.,National University of La Plata | And 4 more authors.
Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing | Year: 2012

The increasing growth of the Web field has promoted the development of a plethora of Model-Driven Web Engineering (MDWE) approaches. These methodologies share a top-down approach: they start by modeling application content, then they define a navigational schema, and finally refine the latter to obtain presentation and rich behavior specifications. Such approach makes it difficult to acquire quick feedback from customers. Conversely, agile methods follow a non-structured, implementation-centered process building software prototypes to get immediate feedback. In this work we propose an agile approach to MDWE methodologies (called Mockup-Driven Development, or MockupDD) by inverting the development process: we start from user interface mockups that facilitate the generation of software prototypes and models, then we enrich them and apply heuristics in order to obtain software specifications at different abstraction levels. As a result, we get an agile prototype-based iterative process, with advantages of a MDWE one. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.


Rivero J.M.,National University of La Plata | Rivero J.M.,CONICET | Grigera J.,National University of La Plata | Rossi G.,National University of La Plata | And 4 more authors.
CEUR Workshop Proceedings | Year: 2011

The increasing growth of the Web field has promoted the development of a plethora of Model-Driven Web Engineering (MDWE) approaches. These methodologies share a top-down approach: they start by modeling ap plicationcontent, then they define a navigational schema, and finally refine the latter to obtain presentation and rich behavior specifications. Such approach makes it difficult to acquire quick feedback from customers. Conversely, agile methods follow a non-structured, implementation-centered process building software prototypes to get immediate feedback. In this work we propose an agile approach to MDWE methodologies (called Mockup-Driven Development, or MockupDD) by inverting the development process: we start from user interface mockups that facilitate the generation of software prototypes and models, then we enrich them and apply heuristics in order to obtain software specifications at different abstraction levels. As a result, we get an agile prototype-based iterative process, with advantages of a MDWE one.


Gilmore S.,University of Edinburgh | Gonczy L.,Budapest University of Technology and Economics | Koch N.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Koch N.,Cirquent GmbH | And 3 more authors.
Software and Systems Modeling | Year: 2011

Systems based on the service-oriented architecture (SOA) principles have become an important cornerstone of the development of enterprise-scale software applications. They are characterized by separating functions into distinct software units, called services, which can be published, requested and dynamically combined in the production of business applications. Service-oriented systems (SOSs) promise high flexibility, improved maintainability, and simple re-use of functionality. Achieving these properties requires an understanding not only of the individual artifacts of the system but also their integration. In this context, non-functional aspects play an important role and should be analyzed and modeled as early as possible in the development cycle. In this paper, we discuss modeling of non-functional aspects of service-oriented systems, and the use of these models for analysis and deployment. Our contribution in this paper is threefold. First, we show how services and service compositions may be modeled in UML by using a profile for SOA (UML4SOA) and how non-functional properties of service-oriented systems can be represented using the non-functional extension of UML4SOA (UML4SOA-NFP) and the MARTE profile. This enables modeling of performance, security and reliable messaging. Second, we discuss formal analysis of models which respect this design, in particular we consider performance estimates and reliability analysis using the stochastically timed process algebra PEPA as the underlying analytical engine. Last but not least, our models are the source for the application of deployment mechanisms which comprise model-to-model and model-to-text transformations implemented in the framework VIATRA. All techniques presented in this work are illustrated by a running example from an eUniversity case study. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.


Elgner J.,S and N AG | Gnesi S.,CNR Institute of Neuroscience | Koch N.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Koch N.,Cirquent GmbH | Mayer P.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2011

A main challenge in Sensoria has been the inclusion of case studies from different industrial and academic application areas, namely finance, automotive, telecommunications, and university administration. The case studies, along with a short description of available scenarios, have already been introduced in Chapter 0-3. In this chapter, we go into more detail, presenting the (graphical) specifications for selected scenarios by using the modeling approaches introduced in Sensoria. Furthermore, we detail the implementation of demonstrators for some of the case studies. © 2011 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Elgner J.,S and N AG | Gnesi S.,CNR Institute of Information Science and Technologies Alessandro Faedo | Koch N.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Koch N.,Cirquent GmbH | Mayer P.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2011

The foundational research carried out in Sensoria has been steered by a number of case studies for ensuring applicability of Sensoria methods and meeting expectations of society and the economy. In this chapter, we introduce these case studies. Three of the case studies came from industrial applications in automotive, finance and telecommunication domains; one came from an academic application for distributed e-learning and course management. Having in mind the relevance that these areas have in society and the economy, the above case studies have been extensively used in Sensoria during the whole project. © 2011 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Discover hidden collaborations