Orkoien, Spain
Orkoien, Spain

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Mellisho C.D.,CSIC - Center of Edafology and Applied Biology of the Segura | Gonzalez-Barrio R.,CSIC - Center of Edafology and Applied Biology of the Segura | Ferreres F.,CSIC - Center of Edafology and Applied Biology of the Segura | Ortuno M.F.,CSIC - Center of Edafology and Applied Biology of the Segura | And 6 more authors.
Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture | Year: 2011

BACKGROUND This study was designed to describe the phenolic status of lemon juice obtained from fruits of lemon trees differing in iron (Fe) nutritional status. Three types of Fe(III) compound were used in the experiment, namely a synthetic chelate and two complexes derived from natural polymers of humic and lignine nature. RESULTS All three Fe(III) compounds were able to improve the Fe nutritional status of lemon trees, though to different degrees. This Fe(III) compound effect led to changes in the polyphenol content of lemon juice. Total phenolics were decreased (∼33% average decrease) and, in particular, flavanones, flavones and flavonols were affected similarly. CONCLUSION Iron-deficient trees showed higher phenolic contents than Fe(III) compound-treated trees, though Fe deficiency had negative effects on the yield and visual quality of fruits. However, from a human nutritional point of view and owing to the health-beneficial properties of their bioavailable phenolic compounds, the nutritional quality of fruits of Fe-deficient lemon trees in terms of phenolics was higher than that of fruits of Fe(III) compound-treated lemon trees. Moreover, diosmetin-6,8-di-C-glucoside in lemon juice can be used as a marker for correction of Fe deficiency in lemon trees. © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.


San Francisco S.,CIPAV TAI Roullier Group | Urrutia O.,CIPAV TAI Roullier Group | Martin V.,CIPAV TAI Roullier Group | Peristeropoulos A.,CIPAV TAI Roullier Group | And 2 more authors.
Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture | Year: 2011

Some authors suggest that the absence of tillage in agricultural soils might have an influence on the efficiency of nitrogen applied in the soil surface. In this study we investigate the influence of no-tillage and soil characteristics on the efficiency of a urease inhibitor (N-(n-butyl)thiophosphoric triamide, NBPT) and a nitrification inhibitor (diciandiamide, DCD) in decreasing ammonia volatilization from urea and ammonium nitrate (AN), respectively. RESULTS: The results indicate that ammonia volatilization in soils amended with urea was significantly higher than in those fertilized with AN. Likewise, the main soil factors affecting ammonia volatilization from urea are clay and sand soil contents. While clay impedes ammonia volatilization, sand favours it. The presence of organic residues on soil surface (no-tillage) tends to increase ammonia volatilization from urea, although this fact depended on soil type. The presence of NBPT in urea fertilizer significantly reduced soil ammonia volatilization. This action of NBPT was negatively affected by acid soil pH and favoured by soil clay content. CONCLUSION: The presence of organic residues on soil surface amended with urea increased ammonia volatilization, and was particularly high in sandy compared with clay soils. Application of NBPT reduced ammonia volatilization although its efficiency is reduced in acid soils. Concerning AN fertilization, there were no differences in ammonia volatilization with or without DCD in no-tillage soils. © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

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