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Guasave, Mexico

Vargas-Madriz H.,Colegio de Mexico | Bautista-Martinez N.,Colegio de Mexico | Vera-Graziano J.,Colegio de Mexico | Garcia-Gutierrez C.,CIIDIR IPN Sinaloa | Chavarin-Palacio C.,SENASICA DGSV SINAVEF
Florida Entomologist | Year: 2013

The effects of 2 varieties of tomato, Solanum lycopersicum L., i.e., 'Charanda F1' and 'Rafaello', were evaluated on the morphometries of Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc). Eggs, nymphs, and adults of B. cockerelli were collected from 2 varieties of tomato, 'Charanda F1' and 'Rafaello', under greenhouse conditions in the Colegio de Postgraduados, Campus Montecillo, Texcoco, the State of Mexico, during the periods Oct-Dec 2009 and Jan-Mar 2010. Since 2000-2001 the B. cockerelli cultures were maintained on tomato with no exposure to agro-chemicals. Adult B. cockerelli were kept in individual growth chambers constructed of wooden frames covered with organza cloth, under 14:10 h L:D and temperatures ranging from 10 to 25 °C. For morphometric analysis of the eggs, the following variables were investigated: egg length (LH), egg width (AH), and pedicel length (PED). For nymphs, the variables were: body length (LC), body width (AC), and antennal length (ANT). For adults, the variables were: body length (LC), body width at thorax (ACT), wing length (LALA), and wing width (ANALA). The 2 tomato varieties were found to have differential morphometric effects on B. cockerelli as follows: no significant differences on egg length (F1,41 = 0.57; P = 0.4551), but egg width was differentially affected by the variety of tomato (F1,41 = 11.92; P = 0.0013). There were significant differential effects of tomato variety on nymphs: body length (F4,324 = 1199.2; P < 0.0001), body width (F4,324 = 900.72; P = 0.0001); and antennae length (F4,324 = 883.93; P = 0.0001). Body length of the adults (F1,117 = 7.11; P = 0.0087) was differentially affected by the 2 different tomato varieties. None of the plants showed any symptoms of infection by 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum', which is known to cause effects on B. cockerelli fitness traits. Body width and antennal length of nymphs can be recommended to differentiate all 5 nymphal instars on this pest species, which has practical implications. Source


Vargas-Madriz H.,Colegio de Mexico | Bautista-Martinez N.,Colegio de Mexico | Vera-Graziano J.,Colegio de Mexico | Sanchez-Garcia P.,Colegio de Mexico | And 2 more authors.
Journal of insect science (Online) | Year: 2014

It is known that some nutrients can have both negative and positive effects on some populations of insects. To test this, the Logrank test and the Interval Overlap Test were evaluated for two crop cycles (February-May and May-August) of the 7705 tomato hybrid, and the effect on the psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc.) (Hemiptera: Triozidae), was examined under greenhouse conditions. Tomato plants were in polythene bags and irrigated with the following solutions: T1-Steiner solution, T2-Steiner solution with nitrogen reduced to 25%, T3-Steiner solution with potassium reduced to 25%, and T4-Steiner solution with calcium reduced to 25%. In the Logrank test, a significant difference was found when comparing the survival parameters of B. cockerelli generated from the treatment cohorts: T1-T2; T1-T3; T1-T4; T2-T3; and T3-T4, while no significant differences were found in the T2-T4 comparison in the February-May cycle. In the May-August cycle, significant differences were found when comparing the survival parameters generated from the treatment cohorts: T1-T2; T1-T3; and T1-T4, while no significant differences were found in the T2-T3; T2-T4; and T3-T4 comparisons of survival parameters of B. cockerelli fed with the 7705 tomato hybrid. Also, the Interval Overlap Test was done on the treatment cohorts (T1, T2, T3, and T4) in the February-May and May-August cycles. T1 and T2 compare similarly in both cycles when feeding on the treatments up to 36 d. Similarly, in T1 and T3, the behavior of the insect is similar when feeding on the treatments up to 40 and 73 d, respectively. Comparisons T2-T3 and T2-T4 are similar when feeding on both treatments up to 42, 38 and 37, 63 d, respectively. Finally, the T3-T4 comparison was similar when feeding in both treatments up to 20 and 46 d, respectively. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America. Source


Vargas-Madriz H.,Colegio de Mexico | Bautista-Martinez N.,Colegio de Mexico | Vera-Graziano J.,Colegio de Mexico | Garca-Gutierrez C.,CIIDIR IPN Sinaloa | Chavarin-Palacio C.,Colegio de Mexico
Southwestern Entomologist | Year: 2011

The lifecycle of Bactericera cockerelli was evaluated on the tomato varieties 'Charanda F1' and 'Rafaello', under greenhouse conditions at the Colegio de Postgraduados, Campus Montecillo, Texcoco, Mexico, during OctoberDecember, 2009 and January-March, 2010. A line of B. cockerelli dating from 10 years ago free from agrochemical applications was used. The adults were kept in individual growth chambers. The parameters measured were average life expectancy (ex), net reproductive ratio (Ro), time of generation (T), intrinsic natural increase ratio (rm), finite increase ratio (γ), births (b), and mortality (d) in each of the varieties. For the OctoberDecember cycle, reproduction began at 34 days in the 'Charanda F1' variety, and at 41 days in January-March. The incubation period for the eggs was 713 days, with a nymphal period of 3237 days in 'Charanda F1'; in 'Rafaello', incubation took 810 days, with a nymphal period of 3135 days. The lifecycle in Charanda F1 was 6369 days, and was 6870 days in Rafaello. The accumulated fecundity of the females was 3,4263,200 eggs in Charanda F1 and 2,1422,099 eggs in Rafaello. Source


Ruiz-Guerrero R.,CIITEC IPN | Norzagaray-Campos M.,CIIDIR IPN Sinaloa
Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine | Year: 2015

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate five indigenous Mexican plants [Hippocratea excelsa, Hippocratea celastroides, Argemone mexicana (A. mexicana), Tagetes lucida, and Pseudosmodingium perniciosum (P. perniciosum)] toxicity against the fourth instar larvae of the dengue primary vector, Aedes aegypti (A. aegypti). METHODS: Each plant part was treated successively with hexane, ethyl acetate, acetone, and methanol to extract potential active components of the plants against the dengue vector. RESULTS: There was a range of toxicity at 24 or 48 h post-exposure for the different plant parts and organic solvent used (LC50 values ranged between 20 and 890 μg/mL). Extracts from seeds of A. mexicana (hexane washing with methanol and acetone) and stem-bark of P. perniciosum (hexane) showed highest toxicity to Ae. aegypti larvae at 48 h post-exposure (LC50 values were 80, 50, and 20 μg/mL, respectively), thus making them potential candidates as biolarvicides. Efforts are on-going to characterize the bioactive components of the extracts, through chromatography, for their use as biological tools for the control of the primary dengue vector. CONCLUSIONS: A. mexicana and P. perniciosum are good candidates to combat the dengue vector, Ae. aegypti, as they were highly toxic to the larvae. © 2015 Hainan Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Source


Garcia-Guerrero M.,Laboratorio Of Acuacultura | Hernandez-Sandoval P.,CIIDIR IPN Sinaloa | Hernandez-Sandoval P.,Occidente University | Orduna-Rojas J.,CIIDIR IPN Sinaloa | Cortes-Jacinto E.,National Polytechnic Institute of Mexico
Hidrobiologica | Year: 2013

The objective was to determine the effect of temperature on the development of Australian crayfish Cherax quadricari-natus juveniles and its thermal preference under laboratory conditions. The determination of the effect of temperature was made based on the results of growth and survival of juvenile crayfish C. quadricarinatus. The crayfish were cultivated and fed with commercial shrimp pellets for 90 days at four different temperatures (20, 25, 28, and 31 °C). The greatest weight increase and total biomass were obtained at 28 °C and the highest survival (83%) at 25 °C. The thermal preference of crayfish after the assay was also examined in crayfish of each treatment. The thermal preference of crayfish was always between 23 °C and 26 °C. Source

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