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Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRAIA-1-2014-2015 | Award Amount: 10.00M | Year: 2016

ENSAR2 is the integrating activity for European nuclear scientists who are performing research in three of the major subfields defined by NuPECC: Nuclear Structure and Dynamics, Nuclear Astrophysics and Nuclear Physics Tools and Applications. It proposes an optimised ensemble of Networking (NAs), Joint Research (JRAs) and Transnational Access Activities (TAs), which will ensure qualitative and quantitative improvement of the access provided by the current ten infrastructures, which are at the core of this proposal. The novel and innovative developments that will be achieved by the RTD activities will also assure state-of-the-art technology needed for the new large-scale projects. Our community of nuclear scientists profits from the diverse range of world-class research infrastructures all over Europe that can supply different ion beams and energies and, with ELI-NP, high-intensity gamma-ray beams up to 20 MeV. We have made great effort to make the most efficient use of these facilities by developing the most advanced and novel equipment needed to pursue their excellent scientific programmes and applying state-of-the-art developments to other fields and to benefit humanity (e.g. archaeology, medical imaging). Together with multidisciplinary and application-oriented research at the facilities, these activities ensure a high-level socio-economic impact. To enhance the access to these facilities, the community has defined a number of JRAs, using as main criterion scientific and technical promise. These activities deal with novel and innovative technologies to improve the operation of the facilities. The NAs of ENSAR2 have been set-up with specific actions to strengthen the communities coherence around certain resarch topics and to ensure a broad dissemination of results and stimulate multidisciplinary, application-oriented research and innovation at the Research Infrastructures.


The CryoHub innovation project will investigate and extend the potential of large-scale Cryogenic Energy Storage (CES) and will apply the stored energy for both cooling and energy generation. By employing Renewable Energy Sources (RES) to liquefy and store cryogens, CryoHub will balance the power grid, while meeting the cooling demand of a refrigerated food warehouse and recovering the waste heat from its equipment and components. The intermittent supply is a major obstacle to the RES power market. In reality, RES are fickle forces, prone to over-producing when demand is low and failing to meet requirements when demand peaks. Europe is about to generate 20% of its required energy from RES by 2020, so that the proper RES integration poses continent-wide challenges. The Cryogenic Energy Storage (CES), and particularly the Liquid Air Energy Storage (LAES), is a promising technology enabling on-site storage of RES energy during periods of high generation and its use at peak grid demand. Thus, CES acts as Grid Energy Storage (GES), where cryogen is boiled to drive a turbine and to restore electricity to the grid. To date, CES applications have been rather limited by the poor round trip efficiency (ratio between energies spent for and retrieved from energy storage) due to unrecovered energy losses. The CryoHub project is therefore designed to maximise the CES efficiency by recovering energy from cooling and heating in a perfect RES-driven cycle of cryogen liquefaction, storage, distribution and efficient use. Refrigerated warehouses for chilled and frozen food commodities are large electricity consumers, possess powerful installed capacities for cooling and heating and waste substantial amounts of heat. Such facilities provide the ideal industrial environment to advance and demonstrate the LAES benefits. CryoHub will thus resolve most of the above-mentioned problems at one go, thereby paving the way for broader market prospects for CES-based technologies across Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-33-2016 | Award Amount: 2.86M | Year: 2017

Despite process heat is recognized as the application with highest potential among solar heating and cooling applications, Solar Heat for Industrial Processes (SHIP) still presents a modest share of about 0.3% of total installed solar thermal capacity. As of todays technology development stage economic competitiveness restricted to low temperature applications; technology implementation requiring interference with existing heat production systems, heat distribution networks or even heat consuming processes - Solar thermal potential is mainly identified for new industrial capacity in outside Americas and Europe. In this context, INSHIP aims at the definition of a ECRIA engaging major European research institutes with recognized activities on SHIP, into an integrated structure that could successfully achieve the coordination objectives of: more effective and intense cooperation between EU research institutions; alignment of different SHIP related national research and funding programs, avoiding overlaps and duplications and identifying gaps; acceleration of knowledge transfer to the European industry, to be the reference organization to promote and coordinate the international cooperation in SHIP research from and to Europe, while developing coordinated R&D TRLs 2-5 activities with the ambition of progressing SHIP beyond the state-of-the-art through: an easier integration of low and medium temperature technologies suiting the operation, durability and reliability requirements of industrial end users; expanding the range of SHIP applications to the EI sector through the development of suitable process embedded solar concentrating technologies, overcoming the present barrier of applications only in the low and medium temperature ranges; increasing the synergies within industrial parks, through centralized heat distribution networks and exploiting the potential synergies of these networks with district heating and with the electricity grid.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-11-2015 | Award Amount: 6.00M | Year: 2016

The business model currently under development for second generation ethanol is a replication of the model used for first generation which is plants with massive annual production capacities. Such high production rates require high capital investment and huge amounts of biomasses (250-350,000 tons per year) concentrated in small radius catchment areas to afford transportation costs (50 km). Under such conditions, opportunities for installing plants in most rural areas in Europe and worldwide are scarce. The objective of the project is to develop an alternative solution for the production of 2G ethanol, competitive at smaller industrial scale and therefore applicable to a large amount of countries, rural areas and feedstocks. The target is to reach technical, environmental and economical viabilities in production units processing at least 30,000 tons equivalent dry biomass per year. This approach will definitely enlarge the scope of biomass feedstocks exploitable for the production of biofuel and create better conditions for the deployment of production sites, to the benefit of rural areas in Europe and worldwide. The main concept underpinning the project relies on a new biomass conversion process able to run all the steps from the pretreatment of the raw material to the enzymatic pre-hydrolysis in one-stage-reactor under mild operating conditions. This new process recently developed to TRL 4, offers the most integrated and compact solution for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass for the production of ethanol developed so far, and it will lead to reduced capital and operation expenditures. The new process will be developed to TRL 5 in the project with the goal of achieving satisfactory technical, environmental and economical performances in relevant operation environment. The project will investigate and select business cases for installations of demonstration/first-of-a-kind small-scale industrial plants in different European and Latino American countries.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: NMP-16-2015 | Award Amount: 10.51M | Year: 2016

RAISELIFE focuses on extending the in-service lifetime of five key materials for concentrated solar power technologies: 1) protective and anti-soiling coatings of primary reflectors, 2) high-reflective surfaces for heliostats, 3) high-temperature secondary reflectors, 4) receiver coatings for solar towers and line-focus collectors, 5) corrosion resistant high-temperature metals and coatings for steam and molten salts. The project brings together a broad consortium formed of industry partners, SMEs and research institutes of the concentrating solar thermal and material science sector. The scope has been significantly shaped by the leading EPC of solar tower technology, BrightSource, who constructed Ivanpah, the worlds largest solar tower plant. This unique constellation permits a direct transfer of the obtained results in RAISELIFE into new commercial solar thermal power plant projects within less than 5 years and helps to solve urgent matters of current commercial power plants (e.g. the high temperature oxidation of absorber coatings on metallic tower receivers). For this purpose several TRL6 functional materials are being tested in accelerated climate chamber tests, field-tests under elevated solar flux and in-service in BSIIs power plants, with the final goal of increasing durability and performance and in consequence reducing CAPEX and OPEX. We project that commercial implementation of the subject technologies could account for as much as 2.5-3 euro-cent Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) reduction per kWh of electricity produced for solar tower technology between 2015 and 2020.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-02-2015 | Award Amount: 5.94M | Year: 2016

Concentrating Solar Power is one of the most promising and sustainable renewable energy and is positioned to play a massive role in the future global generation mix, alongside wind, hydro and solar photovoltaic technologies. Although there is definitely perspective for the technology for rapid grow, success of CSP will ultimately rely on the ability to overcome obstacles that prevent its mass adoption, especially the large financial demand and limited accessibility of water. Water saving is therefore one of the major issues to ensure a financially competitive position of CSP plants and their sustainable implementation. To overcome such challenges, WASCOP brings together leading EU and Moroccan Institutions, Universities, and commercial SMEs and industry. They join their forces to develop a revolutionary innovation in water management of CSP plants - flexible integrated solution comprising different innovative technologies and optimized strategies for the cooling of the power-block and the cleaning of the solar field optical surfaces. WASCOP main advantage consists in the ability to reflect and adapt to the specific conditions prevailing at individual CSP plants, unlike other competitive approaches proposing a single generic solution applicable only on some referenced cases. The WASCOP holistic solution provides an effective combination of technologies allowing a significant reduction in water consumption (up to 70% - 90%) and a significant improvement in the water management of CSP plants. To demonstrate the benefits (whether economic or environmental), the developed system will be tested and validated in real conditions of four testing sites in France, Spain and Morocco after preliminary demonstration in laboratory environment.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-15-2015 | Award Amount: 12.49M | Year: 2016

To meet the ambitious EC target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS) needs to move rapidly towards full scale implementation with geological storage solutions both on and offshore. Onshore storage offers increased flexibility and reduced infrastructure and monitoring costs. Enabling onshore storage will support management of decarbonisation strategies at territory level while enhancing security of energy supply and local economic activities, and securing jobs across Europe. However, successful onshore storage also requires some unique technical and societal challenges to be overcome. ENOS will provide crucial advances to help foster onshore CO2 storage across Europe through: 1) Developing, testing and demonstrating in the field, under real-life conditions, key technologies specifically adapted to onshore storage. 2) Contributing to the creation of a favourable environment for onshore storage across Europe. The ENOS site portfolio will provide a great opportunity for demonstration of technologies for safe and environmentally sound storage at relevant scale. Best practices will be developed using experience gained from the field experiments with the participation of local stakeholders and the lay public. This will produce improved integrated research outcomes and increase stakeholder understanding and confidence in CO2 storage. In this improved framework, ENOS will catalyse new onshore pilot and demonstration projects in new locations and geological settings across Europe, taking into account the site-specific and local socio-economic context. By developing technologies from TRL4/5 to TRL6 across the storage lifecycle, feeding the resultant knowledge and experience into training and education and cooperating at the pan-European and global level, ENOS will have a decisive impact on innovation and build the confidence needed for enabling onshore CO2 storage in Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: COFUND-PCP | Phase: INFRASUPP-2-2015 | Award Amount: 6.65M | Year: 2016

The full exploitation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the highest priority of the European Strategy for particle physics. Because of this accelerator Europe is in a leading global position on High Energy Physics research. To preserve that position, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s to increase its luminosity by a factor of five beyond its design value. The novel configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC, is based on the development of key innovative technologies representing exceptional technological challenges. The LHC now has an urgent need for magnet technologies at the cutting edge of science which are currently not on the market and are not even being considered by commercial suppliers due to their novelty and low volume production demands. The requirements of the LHC are, among others, long orbit corrector magnets for the necessary adjustment of the particles orbit and two-in-one quadrupoles magnets in charge of providing the strong focusing of particle beams. To the companies that should produce these magnets, the commercial application potential for this technology is at this time - too low. The QUACO project draws together several research infrastructures with similar technical requirements in magnet development, which will allow the avoidance of unnecessary duplication of design effort and reduce overall cost through economies of scale using a joint procurement process. By pooling efforts on technological requirements and using their experience from prior procurements, the partners in QUACO will act as a single buyer group with sufficient momentum for potential suppliers to consider the phased development of the requested magnets. The pre-competitive procurement (PCP) instrument used in this project will thus take away the mismatch between the high-end R&D effort and the existing market for these instruments and allow large and small specialised companies to increase the speed of their own research and technology development.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: NMBP-17-2016 | Award Amount: 6.31M | Year: 2017

NEXTOWER shall introduce a set of innovative materials to boost the performance of atmospheric air-based concentrated solar power (CSP) systems to make them commercially viable. In particular, tower systems are appealing for the great environmental compatibility and offer tremendous potential for efficient (electrical and thermal) power generation. Yet, their industrial exploitation has been so far hindered by limitations in the materials used both for the central receiver - the core component - and for thermal storage. Such limitations dictate maximum working temperature and in-service overall durability (mainly driven by failure from thermal cycling and thermal shocks). Improving the efficiency of a tower system entails necessarily improving the central receiver upstream and possibly re-engineering the whole systems downstream to work longer and at much higher temperature, especially in the thermal storage compartment. NEXTOWER will address this need by taking a comprehensive conceptual and manufacturing approach that will optimize bulk and joining materials for durability at the component level to achieve 25 years of maintenance-free continued service of the receiver and maximum thermodynamic efficiency at the system level. This is made possible through a unique combination of excellence in materials design and manufacturing, CSP full-scale testing facilities brought together in the Consortium, supporting the making of a new full scale demo SOLEAD (in Turkey) within the project. The successful achievement of a new generation of materials allowing for virtually maintenance free operations and increased working temperature shall result in the next-generation of air-coolant CSP highly competitive over other CSP alternatives and sustainable power supply options.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 900.00K | Year: 2017

The challenges facing society in urban wastewater management cannot be solved by any one sector alone. ALICE (AcceLerate Innovation in urban wastewater management for Climate changE) will accelerate innovation by bringing together and exchanging knowledge between the key players who can, together, address the future techno-economic, governance and societal challenges arising from climate change. It will boost international and interdisciplinary skills, as well as careers perspective of Experienced Researchers, Early Stage Researchers, and the workforce of industry, water utilities and public organizations. The results will 1) benefit water utilities, 2) support political and managerial decisions in wastewater, 3) benefit wastewater equipment manufacturers, identifying new market opportunities in the EU, 4) benefit EU citizens from the improved wastewater infrastructure, the environment and job creations. Higher precipitation and more frequent storms will require change in sewer water management. Moreover, higher risks of water scarcity and droughts require increased wastewater reuse, currently at 20% of its potential in the EU. These changes will lead to increased energy demand in a sector that is already a major contributor of carbon emissions. ALICE will promote effective solutions based on innovative technologies, green infrastructures, climate vulnerability assessments, governance and economic models, embracing stakeholders and citizens views to overcome barriers to the acceptance and uptake of new technologies. The excellence of the project lies in the joined-up thinking of different perspectives and disciplines. Academic and non-academic partners along the wastewater value-chain will exchange knowledge, develop training, research and innovation activities. ALICE will build lasting knowledge and cooperation networks and will provide the non-academic sector with practical solutions to respond in innovative ways to the challenges posed by climate change.

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