Donostia / San Sebastian, Spain
Donostia / San Sebastian, Spain

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A method for producing a barrier layer and a carrier body including such a barrier layer are disclosed. In an embodiment the method includes providing a carrier body including a polymer film having at least one polymer, drying the barrier interface, exposing the barrier interface to one reagent gas, or to a plurality of reagent gases which do not chemically react with each other, so that the at least one reagent gas chemically reacts with the at least one polymer at least inside the polymer film in at least one chemical reaction thereby forming the barrier layer, and removing at least one product gas of the at least one chemical reaction.


The method is for producing a barrier layer (22) in a polymer film (2) and comprises the steps of: A) providing a carrier body (1) comprising the polymer film (2) which is made from at least one polymer, the polymer film (2) forming a barrier interface (20) of the carrier body (1), B) drying the barrier interface (20), C) exposing the barrier interface (20) to one reagent gas (4), or to a plurality of reagent gases (4) which do not chemically react with each other,so that the at least one reagent gas (4) chemically reacts with the at least one polymer at least inside the polymer film (2) in at least one chemical reaction and so forming the barrier layer (22), and D) removing at least one product gas (5) of said at least one chemical reaction.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Training Grant | Award Amount: 3.94M | Year: 2014

The achievements of modern research and their rapid progress from theory to application are increasingly underpinned by computation. Computational approaches are often hailed as a new third pillar of science - in addition to empirical and theoretical work. While its breadth makes computation almost as ubiquitous as mathematics as a key tool in science and engineering, it is a much younger discipline and stands to benefit enormously from building increased capacity and increased efforts towards integration, standardization, and professionalism. The development of new ideas and techniques in computing is extremely rapid, the progress enabled by these breakthroughs is enormous, and their impact on society is substantial: modern technologies ranging from the Airbus 380, MRI scans and smartphone CPUs could not have been developed without computer simulation; progress on major scientific questions from climate change to astronomy are driven by the results from computational models; major investment decisions are underwritten by computational modelling. Furthermore, simulation modelling is emerging as a key tool within domains experiencing a data revolution such as biomedicine and finance. This progress has been enabled through the rapid increase of computational power, and was based in the past on an increased rate at which computing instructions in the processor can be carried out. However, this clock rate cannot be increased much further and in recent computational architectures (such as GPU, Intel Phi) additional computational power is now provided through having (of the order of) hundreds of computational cores in the same unit. This opens up potential for new order of magnitude performance improvements but requires additional specialist training in parallel programming and computational methods to be able to tap into and exploit this opportunity. Computational advances are enabled by new hardware, and innovations in algorithms, numerical methods and simulation techniques, and application of best practice in scientific computational modelling. The most effective progress and highest impact can be obtained by combining, linking and simultaneously exploiting step changes in hardware, software, methods and skills. However, good computational science training is scarce, especially at post-graduate level. The Centre for Doctoral Training in Next Generation Computational Modelling will develop 55+ graduate students to address this skills gap. Trained as future leaders in Computational Modelling, they will form the core of a community of computational modellers crossing disciplinary boundaries, constantly working to transfer the latest computational advances to related fields. By tackling cutting-edge research from fields such as Computational Engineering, Advanced Materials, Autonomous Systems and Health, whilst communicating their advances and working together with a world-leading group of academic and industrial computational modellers, the students will be perfectly equipped to drive advanced computing over the coming decades.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: ISSI-3-2015 | Award Amount: 3.00M | Year: 2016

The Marina proposal overall aim is to create an all-inclusive Knowledge Sharing Platform (KSP) catalysing and organising the convergence of already existing networks, communities, on-line platforms and services providing an online socio-technical environment that facilitates and stimulates the direct engagement of researchers, Civil Society Organisations (CSOs), citizens, industry stakeholders, policy and decision makers, research funders and communicators for improving Responsible Research and Innovation. In particular, the project will establish, curate and experiment a Responsible Research and Innovation platform involving societal actors working together during the whole research and innovation process for aligning better both the process and its outcomes, with the values, needs and expectations of European society, integrating citizens visions, needs and desires into science and innovation, promoting RRI with focus on marine issues and pressures that have important effects on the European societies. The project activities and outcomes, even if connected with marine research field, will define this systematic approach in order to make it transferable and reproducible for any RRI thematic domain. All project results and activities will be extrapolated from the RRI marine field to general RRI and broadly disseminated. The expected outcome of the Work Programme is a clear improvement of the integration of society in science and innovation. The MARINA project will follow this strategic line of strengthening and facilitating the capacity of the research and innovation to align and integrate the social needs through a suitable knowledge sharing platform and federating activities.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CPCSA | Phase: ICT-2013.9.9 | Award Amount: 74.61M | Year: 2013

This Flagship aims to take graphene and related layered materials from a state of raw potential to a point where they can revolutionize multiple industries from flexible, wearable and transparent electronics, to new energy applications and novel functional composites.\nOur main scientific and technological objectives in the different tiers of the value chain are to develop material technologies for ICT and beyond, identify new device concepts enabled by graphene and other layered materials, and integrate them to systems that provide new functionalities and open new application areas.\nThese objectives are supported by operative targets to bring together a large core consortium of European academic and industrial partners and to create a highly effective technology transfer highway, allowing industry to rapidly absorb and exploit new discoveries.\nThe Flagship will be aligned with European and national priorities to guarantee its successful long term operation and maximal impact on the national industrial and research communities.\nTogether, the scientific and technological objectives and operative targets will allow us to reach our societal goals: the Flagship will contribute to sustainable development by introducing new energy efficient and environmentally friendly products based on carbon and other abundant, safe and recyclable natural resources, and boost economic growth in Europe by creating new jobs and investment opportunities.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: SGA-RIA | Phase: FETFLAGSHIP | Award Amount: 89.00M | Year: 2016

This project is the second in the series of EC-financed parts of the Graphene Flagship. The Graphene Flagship is a 10 year research and innovation endeavour with a total project cost of 1,000,000,000 euros, funded jointly by the European Commission and member states and associated countries. The first part of the Flagship was a 30-month Collaborative Project, Coordination and Support Action (CP-CSA) under the 7th framework program (2013-2016), while this and the following parts are implemented as Core Projects under the Horizon 2020 framework. The mission of the Graphene Flagship is to take graphene and related layered materials from a state of raw potential to a point where they can revolutionise multiple industries. This will bring a new dimension to future technology a faster, thinner, stronger, flexible, and broadband revolution. Our program will put Europe firmly at the heart of the process, with a manifold return on the EU investment, both in terms of technological innovation and economic growth. To realise this vision, we have brought together a larger European consortium with about 150 partners in 23 countries. The partners represent academia, research institutes and industries, which work closely together in 15 technical work packages and five supporting work packages covering the entire value chain from materials to components and systems. As time progresses, the centre of gravity of the Flagship moves towards applications, which is reflected in the increasing importance of the higher - system - levels of the value chain. In this first core project the main focus is on components and initial system level tasks. The first core project is divided into 4 divisions, which in turn comprise 3 to 5 work packages on related topics. A fifth, external division acts as a link to the parts of the Flagship that are funded by the member states and associated countries, or by other funding sources. This creates a collaborative framework for the entire Flagship.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.59M | Year: 2017

Advanced Microscopy techniques are widely recognized as one of the pillars onto which the research and manufacture of Nanotechnology based products is sustained. At present, the greatest challenge faced by these techniques is the realization of fast and non-destructive tomographic images with chemical composition sensitivity and with sub-10 nm spatial resolution, in both organic and inorganic materials, and in all environmental conditions. Scanning Probe Microscopes are currently the Advanced Microscopy techniques experiencing the fastest evolution and innovation towards solving this challenge. Scanning Probe Microscopes have crossed fundamental barriers, and novel systems exist that show potential unparalleled performance in terms of 3D nanoscale imaging capabilities, imaging speed and chemical sensitivity mapping. The objective of the SPM2.0 European Training Network is to train a new generation of researchers in the science and technology of these novel Scanning Probe Microscopes, in which Europe is currently in a leading position, in order to enforce its further development and its quick and wide commercialization and implementation in public and private research centers and industrial and metrology institutions. The researchers of the network will acquire a solid state-of-the-art multidisciplinary scientific training in this field of research, covering from basic science to industrial applications, which should enable them to generate new scientific knowledge of the highest impact. In addition, they will receive a practical training on transferable skills in order to increase their employability perspectives and to qualify them to access to responsibility job positions in the private and public sectors. The final aim of the network is to consolidate Europe as the world leader in Scanning Probe Microscopy technologies and its emerging applications in key sectors like Materials, Microelectronics, Biology and Medicine.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FETOPEN-1-2014 | Award Amount: 2.96M | Year: 2016

2D-INK is targeted at developing inks of novel 2D semiconducting materials for low-cost large-area fabrication processes on insulating substrates through a new methodology, which will exceed the properties of state-of-the-art graphene- and graphene oxide based inks. Achieving this would represent an important step forward in the processing of 2D semiconducting materials and will provide the key parameters for fabricating the next generation of ultrathin electronic appliances. The inherent high-risk of 2D-INK is countered by a strongly interdisciplinary research team composed of 9 partners (8 academics \ 1 SME) with demonstrated experience in their corresponding fields and with different yet highly complementary backgrounds. Therefore only together and in synergy they will be able to address the challenges of the multiple research and innovation aspects of 2D-INK that cover the entire value chain from materials design and synthesis, characterisation, formulation and processing to device implementation. In addition 2D-INK has the potential to revolutionise research on 2D semiconducting materials way beyond the current interests on synthesis (high impact), since the efficient dispersion and formulation of 2D semiconducting materials into inks enables the applications of 2D semiconducting materials over different scientific and technological disciplines, such as electronics, sensing, photonics, energy storage and conversion, spintronics, etc. Overall, 2D-INK addresses perfectly the challenge of this call as it is an archetype of an early stage, high risk visionary science and technology collaborative research project that explores radically new manufacturing and processing technologies for novel 2D semiconducting materials.

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