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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Periodontists Dr. John Paul Gallardo and William P. Lamas will be hosting their next study club in Miami, FL for Dental ED on May 4, 2017 at CIBO Wine Bar in Coral Gables, FL. The educational event will bring together some of the area’s most respected dentists in restorative and general dentistry. The May study club will begin with dinner and social hour at 6pm and the presentation will start at 7 p.m. Once a quarter, Dr. Gallardo and Dr. Lamas host the Miami Study Club to bring the latest innovations in dentistry to South Florida. Both Dr. Gallardo and Dr. Lamas are authorized periodontists to provide continuing education to other dentists. This course’s objectives include learning to combine composites and veneers to preserve dentin, rubber dam placement, difficult case studies, and a conservative approach in management. The course is also designed to stress the essential value of breaking infection at all levels so that doctors attending can return to their offices equipped with practical infection control in the dental setting. “This platform for collaborating with our colleagues allows us to share pearls of wisdom with each other in an intellectually safe and trusting environment,” said Dr. Gallardo. “This ultimately leads to better patient care, improvement, and the evolution of even the most time-proven treatment strategies.” The Miami Study Club is part of Dental ED, an international organization that brings together a wide range of dental professionals to further their education. Each session starts with the latest in dental technologies, trends, and research. Dental ED was launched in 2004 and has become a leader in dentistry training and education by offering study club courses to professionals around the world. Using advances in technology, teach session connects educators to dentists using interactive-web conferencing technology. Dr. Gallardo and Dr. Lamas bring patients from all over the world more than 25 years of experience in the field of implant dentistry and periodontics. Dr. Gallardo attended the University of Miami, New York University, and Boston University. Dr. Lamas is an alumnus of Barry University, the Florida College of Dentistry, and Baylor College of Dentistry-TAMUS. Both doctors are highly respected in the fields of periodontics and implant dentistry. The office offers patients, laser periodontal therapy, dental implants, sedation dentistry, the innovative All-on-4®, as well as gummy smile correction and wisdom teeth removal. The upcoming study club will be held at CIBO Wine Bar, located at 45 Miracle Mile in Coral Gables. Dinner and social hour will begin at 6 p.m. and the educational presentation will follow at 7 p.m. Attending doctors will be awarded with 7.75 continuing education credits. Anyone interested in attending should RSVP by contacting Amelia Gonzalez at Amelia(at)miamiperio(dot)com or calling 305-447-1447.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Saks will be one of the first locations to offer HFactor in its newly-redesigned Hydro-Pack, which now features a twist-off spout. The HFactor hydrogen bar is located at the entrance of The Wellery, directly across from the Concierge. In addition to learning about the benefits of hydrogen-infused water, customers can purchase individual Hydro-Packs at the bar for $3.00, or for at-home delivery of six, twelve, and twenty-four packs of HFactor. For more information about The Saks Wellery, click here. Additional information on HFactor and its benefits can be found by visiting http://www.hfactorwater.com/. About HFactor: Founded in 2013, HFactor is the first functional water supercharged with the documented benefits of hydrogen – a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. HFactor is naturally infused with hydrogen to provide refreshing hydration plus therapeutic benefits for fitness, health and lifestyle recovery and wellness. It comes in a carry-anywhere pouch that optimizes the integrity and pureness of its hydrogen content, which is created without additional chemicals or magnesium.  Sourced and packaged in the United States, HFactor is a premium product that was specifically developed for multi-channel mass distribution.  Currently, HFactor is available at more than 1,100 retail stores, including GNC, GIANT Food Stores and CIBO Express, as well as influential independent health & wellness retailers, and on the HFactor website and on Amazon.com. www.hfactorwater.com To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/hfactor-hydrogen-infused-water-debuts-at-saks-fifth-avenues-new-york-flagship-300456678.html


Portilla-de Buen E.,Surgical Research Division | Sanchez-Corona J.,CIBO | Mendoza-Carrera F.,CIBO
Archives of Medical Research | Year: 2013

Background and Aims: Interleukin-6 is an inflammatory response mediator used as a metabolic marker of obesity. Polymorphisms . IL6 -597C>A, -572G>C, and -174G>C modify the production of this protein. The associations between these haplotypes and obesity or metabolic markers have not been studied in adolescents, so an analysis of these associations was performed. Methods: The cross-sectional study included 745 apparently healthy 14- to 19-year-old adolescents. Obesity, serum glucose, insulin, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were evaluated, and . IL6 -597G>A, -572G>C and -174G>C polymorphisms determined. The associations were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression models. Results: The allele frequencies were 0.15 for -597A and -174C and 0.30 for -572C. Genotypes were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. IL-6-597/-572/-174 haplotypes GGG, GCG, and AGC comprised 99.74% of the total haplotypes. The associations were significant between genotype GCG/GCG and hyperglycemia (OR = 2.86, 95% CI = 1.02-7.97); between GCG/GCG and high hs-CRP (OR = 6.17, 95% CI = 1.13-33.77); between AGC/AGC and obesity (OR = 4.42, 95% CI = 1.40-14.01); and between GGG/GCG and low HDL-C (OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.03-2.28). Conclusions: Genotypes of the IL6-597/-572/-174 polymorphisms are associated with metabolic risk factors in Mexican adolescents. © 2013 IMSS.


Gallegos-Arreola M.P.,Instituto Mexicano Del Seguro Social IMSS | Figuera-Villanueva L.E.,CIBO | Ramos-Silva A.,Instituto Mexicano Del Seguro Social IMSS | Salas-Gonzalez E.,Hospital Of Gineco Obstetricia | And 5 more authors.
Archives of Medical Science | Year: 2014

Introduction: The cystathionine beta synthase (CBS) gene plays an important role in homocysteine metabolism because it catalyzes the first step of the transsulfuration pathway, during which homocysteine is converted to cystathionine. Polymorphisms of CBS have been associated with cancer.Material and methods: We examined the role of the 844ins68 polymorphism by comparing the genotypes of 371 healthy Mexican women with the genotypes of 323 Mexican women with breast cancer (BC).Results: The observed genotype frequencies for controls and BC patients were 1% and 2% for Ins/Ins, 13% and 26% for W/Ins, and 86% and 72% for W/W, respectively. We found that the odds ratio (OR) was 2.2, with a 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of 1.5-3.3, p = 0.0001. The association was also evident when comparing the distribution of the W/Ins-Ins/Ins genotypes in patients in the following categories: 1) menopause and high γ-glutamyl-transferase (GGT) levels (OR of 2.17, 95% CI: 1.17-4.26, p = 0.02), 2) chemotherapy response and high lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels (OR 2.2, 95% CI: 1.08-4.4, p = 0.027), 3) chemotherapy response and high GGT levels (OR 2.46, 95% CI: 1.2-4.8, p = 0.007), and 4) body mass index (BMI) and III-IV tumor stage (OR 3.2, 95% CI: 1.2-8.3, p = 0.013).Conclusions: We conclude that the genotypes W/Ins-Ins/Ins of the 844ins68 polymorphism in the CBS gene contribute significantly to BC susceptibility in the analyzed sample from the Mexican population. © 2014 Termedia & Banach.


Mena J.P.,Centro Universitario Ciencias Of La Salud Cucs | Salazar-Paramo M.,Hospital Of Especialidades | Gonzalez-Lopez L.,Hospital General Regional HGR 110 | Gamez-Nava J.I.,Hospital Of Especialidades | And 7 more authors.
Pharmacogenomics Journal | Year: 2011

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the prototype of the rheumatic diseases worldwide. Methotrexate (MTX) is the drug of first choice in the treatment of this disease due to its immunosuppressant effect. However, side events are present in 30% of the patients. The C677T and A1298C polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene are involved in the metabolism of MTX. Earlier studies reported an association between these polymorphisms and elevation of hepatic enzymes. We analyzed the frequencies of both polymorphisms and the presence of transaminasemia in 70 Mexican patients with rheumatic arthritis treated with MTX. The 19% (13/70) of patients had an increase in the serum level of transaminases. The A1298C polymorphism was associated with elevation of transaminases (P0.024). The identification of MTHFR genotypes for C677T and A1298C polymorphisms could lead clinicians to identify patients in risk of elevation of transaminases, and give them an individualized treatment, as is a goal of pharmacogenetics. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

John Paul Gallardo, D.D.S, P.A. and William P. Lamas, D.M.D., M.S. are excited to announce that they will be hosting the next study club in Miami, FL for Dental ED on February 9th, 2017 at CIBO Wine Bar in Coral Gables, FL. The educational event will bring together some of the area’s most respected professionals in restorative and general dentistry. February’s Study Club will begin with a dinner and social hour at 6 p.m. and the presentation will begin at 7 p.m. Once a quarter, Gallardo & Lamas host the Miami Study Club. As authorized periodontists to provide continuing education credits for other dentists, each session is led by some of dentistry’s most respected educators and practitioners. A warm and cozy atmosphere at CIBO Wine Bar provides a casual time for dentists in the area to increase their knowledge in the field as well as discuss mutual cases and patients. “Regardless of the setting, anytime colleagues get together in the same room there is always something to learn,” said Dr. Gallardo. “I never fail to walk away without a ‘pearl’ whether I am teaching or just sitting in the audience.” The Miami Study Club is part of Dental ED, an international organization bringing together a wide range of dental professionals to further their educational interests. Each session begins with an in-depth talk regarding current dental technologies, trends, and cutting-edge research. Started in 2004, Dental ED has become a leader in dentistry training, offering a variety of study clubs and courses for professionals across the globe. Each session connects with the world’s most respected educators using live, interactive-web conferencing technology. The Miami periodontics and implant dentistry office was founded in 1994 by Dr. Gallardo. In 2004, Dr. Lamas joined Dr. Gallardo to bring patients from all over the world more than 25 years of experience in the field of implant dentistry and periodontics. Dr. Gallardo attended the University of Miami, New York University, and Boston University. Dr. Lamas is an alumnus of Barry University, the Florida College of Dentistry, and Baylor College of Dentistry-TAMUS. Both doctors are highly respected in the fields of periodontics and implant dentistry. The office offers patients same-day dental implants, sedation dentistry, the innovative All-on-4®, as well as gummy smile correction and wisdom teeth removal. February’s Study Club will be held at the CIBO Wine Bar, located at 45 Miracle Mile in Coral Gables. Dinner and social hour will begin at 6 p.m. with the presentation to follow at 7 p.m. Dental professionals attending will be awarded with 2.0 continuing education credits for their attendance. Anyone interested in attending should RSVP by contacting Amelia Gonzalez at Amelia(at)miamiperio(dot)com or calling 305.447.1447.


Gomez-Vazquez M.E.,Hospital General Of Zona No 89 | Hernandez-Salazar E.,UMAE | Novelo-Otanez J.D.,Hospital Of Especialidades | Cabrera-Pivaral C.E.,Hospital Of Especialidades | And 2 more authors.
Cirugia y Cirujanos | Year: 2012

Background: Postoperative pain is the main symptom following a surgical event and is related to an inflammatory process involving cytokine secretion. This type of pain is usually treated with opioids such as morphine, whose analgesic efficacy is well known. However, it is unknown when compared with ketorolac in measuring proinflammatory cytokine levels. The aim of this study was to determine the postoperative analgesic effect with endovenous morphine on proinflammatory cytokine levels in patients who underwent laparoscopic choleystectomy. Methods: We studied 40 patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Patients were randomized to receive morphine (0.05 mg/kg) or ketorolac (0.2 mg/kg) IV during gallbladder extraction and after the surgical event at the following dose: morphine (0.15 mg/kg) or ketorolac (0.7 mg/kg) for 40 min. Clinical evaluations included were hemodynamic, analgesic with visual analogue scale, and sedation (Ramsay scale). IL-1β and TNF-α were measured pre- and postoperatively and after 12 h. Safety profile was evaluated with hemodynamic constants. Statistical analysis was carried out using Mann-Whitney U test and Fisher exact test. Results: TNF-α was increased significantly in the immediate postoperative period and after 12 h in the morphine group. IL-1β was not detected preoperatively, in the immediate postoperative period and 12 h after surgery the levels were similar in both groups. The main adverse event was respiratory depression, which occurred in the morphine group. Conclusions: Proinflammatory cytokines were increased after surgery, particularly TNF-α in the group receiving morphine. The use of morphine is safe postoperatively.


Jauregui-Huerta F.,University of Guadalajara | Ruvalcaba-Delgadillo Y.,University of Guadalajara | Garcia-Estrada J.,CIBO | Feria-Velasco A.,University of Guadalajara | And 3 more authors.
Neuroendocrinology Letters | Year: 2010

OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the cognitive effect of chronic exposure to environmental noise on RAWM performance of juvenile rats, and the ability of adult rats exposed to a novel acute stress to perform in the RAWM as a function of whether or not they were exposed to environmental noise as juveniles. METHODS: We examined the consequences of exposure to noise during the juvenile-early periadolescent period on adulthood stress response by assessing cognitive performance in the RAWM. Male rats were exposed to environmental noise during the childhood-prepubescent period (21-35 PND), and their RAWM performance was tested at the end of the exposure to noise, and then again two months later when they had to cope with a new stressful event. RAWM execution included a 3-day training phase and a reversal learning phase on day 4. Escape latency, reference memory errors and working memory errors were compared between experimental and control groups. In addition, body weight gain and serum corticosterone levels were evaluated. RESULTS: Stressed rats demonstrated spatial impairment, as evidenced by poor execution on day 4. This effect was significantly noticeable in the doubly stressed group. Noise annoyance was evidenced by reduced body weight gain and increased serum corticosterone levels. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that environmental noise may produce potent stress-like effects in developing subjects that can persist into adulthood, affecting spatial learning abilities. This cognitive impairment may restrict the subjects ability to learn under a new spatial configuration. © 2010 Neuroendocrinology Letters.


Velazquez-Zamora D.A.,CIBO | Velazquez-Zamora D.A.,University of Guadalajara | Gonzalez-Tapia D.,CIBO | Gonzalez-Tapia D.,University of Guadalajara | And 6 more authors.
Brain Research | Year: 2012

Cognitive impairment or its recovery has been associated with the absence or reestablishment of estrogenic actions in the central nervous system of female experimental animals or women. It has been proposed that these cognitive phenomena are related to estrogen-mediated modulatory activity of synaptic transmission in brain structures involved in cognitive functions. In the present work a morphological study was conducted in adult female ovariectomized rats to evaluate estradiol-dependent dendritic spine sprouting in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and changes in the presynaptic marker synaptophysin. Three or ten days after estradiol treatment (10 μg/day, twice) in the ovariectomized rats, a significant increase of synaptophysin was observed, which was coincident with a significant higher numerical density of thin (22%), stubby (36%), mushroom (47%) and double spines (125%), at day 3, without significant changes of spine density at day 10, after treatment. These results may be interpreted as evidence of pre- and postsynaptic plastic events that may be involved in the modulation of cognitive-related behavioral performance after estrogen replacement therapy. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. Al l rights reserved.


PubMed | Juan I Menchaca Hospital Civil, Servicio Of Oncologia Fray Antonio Alcalde Hospital Civil, CIBO and University of Guadalajara
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Genetics and molecular research : GMR | Year: 2015

The ZNF217 gene, a potential oncogene amplified and overexpressed in several cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC), acts as a transcription factor that activates or represses target genes. The polymorphisms rs16998248 (T>A) and rs35720349 (C>T) in coronary artery disease have been associated with reduced expression of ZNF217. In this study, we analyzed the 2 polymorphisms in Mexican patients with CRC. Genotyping of rs16998248 and rs35720349 sites was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism in 203 Mexican Mestizos, 101 CRC patients, and 102 healthy blood donors. Although no statistical differences regarding genotype and allele frequencies of ZNF217 polymorphisms were observed (P > 0.05), linkage disequilibrium was significant in CRC patients (r(2) = 0.39, P < 0.0001), as a result of reduced AC haplotype frequency. Thus, the AC haplotype may protect against CRC.

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