Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Moon J.S.,Chungbuk National University | Cho S.K.,Chungbuk National University | Choi H.Y.,Chungbuk National University | Kim J.E.,Chungbuk National University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Microbiology | Year: 2010

Biogenic amines (BAs) are produced primarily by microorganisms found in fermented foods and are often implicated in food poisoning. BA-producing bacteria found in fermented soybean pastes were isolated and characterized using a decarboxylating medium and multiplex PCR analysis. Two BA-producing bacteria were isolated from traditional soybean pastes: one was a histamine-producing Clostridium strain, and the other was a tyramine-producing Pseudomonas strain. The Clostridium strain was determined to be a potent histamine producer among the cultures tested. Synthesis of tyramine by Pseudomonas sp. T1 was observed for the first time in this study. © 2010 The Microbiological Society of Korea and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source


Moon J.S.,Chungbuk National University | Kim Y.,Chungbuk National University | Jang K.I.,Chungbuk National University | Han N.S.,Chungbuk National University | And 4 more authors.
Food Science and Biotechnology | Year: 2010

The aim of this study was to investigate the biogenic amine (BA) contents of fermented fish foods in Korea. A total of 47 samples of anchovy and sand lance sauces and squid, clam, and shrimp pastes were used for high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. The histamine and tyramine contents of the anchovy and sand lance sauces were significantly high. The average histamine contents of all tested samples were >300 mg/kg and the histamine contents were higher in the sauce (aekjeot) samples than in the paste (jeotgal) samples. This result strongly suggests careful monitoring of BA contents in these products is necessary to ensure consumer health. © KoSFoST and Springer 2011. Source


Moon J.S.,Chungbuk National University | Cho K.-J.,Chungbuk Institute of Health and Environment Research | Yang S.-J.,Chungbuk Institute of Health and Environment Research | Yoon G.-M.,Chungbuk Institute of Health and Environment Research | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Microbiology | Year: 2013

Histamine is mainly produced by microorganisms that are found in fermented foods, and is frequently involved in food poisoning. Two histamine-producing bacteria were isolated from fermented fish products, anchovy sauce, and sand lance sauce by using a histidine decarboxylating medium. The species were identified as Bacillus licheniformis A7 and B. coagulans SL5. Multiplex PCR analysis showed the presence of the conserved histidine decarboxylase (hdc) gene in the chromosome of these bacteria. B. licheniformis A7 and B. coagulans SL5 produced the maximum amount of histamine (22.3±3.5 and 15.1±1.5 mg/L, respectively). As such, they were determined to be potential histamine-producing bacteria among the tested cultures. © 2013 The Microbiological Society of Korea and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source

Discover hidden collaborations