CHU UCL Mont Godinne

Yvoir, Belgium

CHU UCL Mont Godinne

Yvoir, Belgium
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Dubuquoy L.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Colombel J.-F.,Icahn Medical School | Jouret-Mourin A.,Cliniques Universitaires | Delos M.,CHU UCL Mont Godinne | And 5 more authors.
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases | Year: 2013

Background: Increased lymphatic vessel (LV) density has been found in uninflamed intestinal wall of patients with Crohn's disease (CD). The goal of the study was to search for an association between LV density in the proximal ileal resection margin at the time of surgery and endoscopic recurrence. Methods: Ileocolonic resection specimens were obtained from 28 CD patients and 10 control subjects. The ileal proximal uninflamed section was used for the histological quantification of LV using immunohistochemistry with D2-40 antibody in the mucosa and submucosa. Quantification of LV was performed in 8 consecutive fields and was blinded to recurrence score. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on the presence (Rutgeerts score, i3/i4) (R+) or absence (Rutgeerts score, i0/i1) (R-) of endoscopic recurrence 1 year after the surgery. All patients were free of immunomodulators or biologics between surgery and postoperative endoscopy. Results: Median LV density was lower in control subjects than in CD patients in the mucosa (4.5%; interquartile range [IQR], 3.6-5.3 versus 5.9%; IQR, 4.2-8.5; P = 0.04) and submucosa (2.4%; IQR, 1.9-3.6 versus 5.7%; IQR, 4.3-6.9; P < 0.01). R-patients had a higher LV density in the proximal resection margin at surgery than R+ patients, both in the mucosa (8.5%; IQR, 6.5-10.3 versus 4.4%; IQR, 3.1-6.1; P < 0.01) and in the submucosa (6.3%; IQR, 5.5-9.3 versus 5.3%; IQR, 3.4-5.9; P = 0.03). Mucosal LV density greater than 7% predicted the absence of endoscopic recurrence at 1 year, with a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 75%. Conclusions: Decreased LV density is associated with high risk of endoscopic recurrence after surgery. Therapies that improve lymphatic flow in the gut may reduce the incidence of endoscopic recurrence. Copyright © 2013 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.


Ossemann M.,CHU UCL Mont Godinne | Ossemann M.,Catholic University of Leuven | De Fays K.,CHU UCL Mont Godinne | De Fays K.,Catholic University of Leuven | And 3 more authors.
Clinical Journal of Pain | Year: 2013

Background: Ultimately, the experience of pain derives from changes in brain excitability. Therefore, modulating the excitability of cortical areas involved in pain processing may become an attractive option in the context of multimodal analgesia during the postoperative period. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can reduce morphine consumption during the postoperative period after gastric bypass surgery. We tested the potential of another method of noninvasive brain stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), to reduce morphine consumption or pain perception during the postoperative period. Methods: Fifty-nine ASA I to II patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery were randomized to receive anodal (n = 20), cathodal (n = 20), or sham (n = 19) tDCS in the recovery room in a double-blind manner. Morphine consumption administrated through patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) was the primary outcome; pain perception as measured by visual analog scale was the secondary outcome. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the 3 groups of patients, either for PCA morphine consumption or for pain scores. Conclusions: Several factors may explain the observed lack of impact of tDCS on PCA morphine consumption and pain perception: the method of brain stimulation (tDCS/rTMS), potential interactions with anesthetic drugs, differences in patients population (gastric bypass surgery/lumbar spine surgery), and the previous experience of pain and chronic consumption of analgesic drugs. Further studies with tDCS should be performed before concluding that tDCS is inefficient for postoperative pain control, because noninvasive brain stimulation methods, such as rTMS and tDCS, may become attractive in the setting of multimodal analgesia. Copyright © 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Eloy P.,CHU UCL Mont Godinne
Rhinology | Year: 2013

A fungal ball consists of a dense conglomerate of fungal hyphae growing at the surface of the sinus mucosa without tissue infiltration. The maxillary sinus is by far the most commonly involved paranasal sinus cavity followed by the sphenoid sinus. The present study is a retrospective study of 25 consecutive cases treated during the last 10 years in the two hospitals be- longing to the Catholic University of Louvain (CHU Mont-Godinne and UCL Saint Luc). We report the symptomatology, the imaging and discuss the different surgical managements. We conclude that the clinician must have a high index of suspicion when dealing with a unilateral rhinosinusitis persisting despite a maximal and well conducted medical treatment. This is particularly so in elderly women when associated with facial pain and post nasal drip, particularly when the computed tomography shows an unilateral opacity of the sphenoid sinus with or without a sclerosis or an erosion of the bony walls, a polyp in the sphenoethmoidal recess or a hyperdensity mimicking a foreign body. An endonasal endoscopic sphenoidotomy is the treatment of choice in most cases, allowing good ventilation of the sinus and radical removal of all the fungal concretion. A biopsy of the sinus mucosa adjacent to fungal elements is of upmost important to confirm the non- invasiveness of the fungi within the tissue. Antifungal medication is not required in uncomplicated forms. All host factors producing some degree of immunosuppression must be corrected when present and must alert the clinician to rule out any forms of invasive disease.


Mormont E.,CHU UCL Mont Godinne | Mormont E.,Catholic University of Louvain | Jamart J.,CHU UCL Mont Godinne | Jacques D.,CHU UCL Mont Godinne
Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology | Year: 2014

Background and purpose: Many people fear that the disclosure of the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD) to patients will prompt depressive symptoms or catastrophic reactions. We aimed to prospectively evaluate the modification of anxiety and depressive symptoms 3 months after the disclosure of the diagnosis of AD.Methods: A total of 100 consecutive newly diagnosed patients with AD (mild or moderate stage) and their caregivers were included. The evolution of symptoms of depression and anxiety was assessed with the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (Zung SDS) and the depression item of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI-d) and the anxiety item of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI-a). After 3 months, the caregivers were asked their opinions on the global effect of the disclosure using a Likert-type scale.Results: At 3 months, there was no significant change in the mean NPI-d (P = .87) and Zung SDS (P = .18) and a significant reduction in the NPI-a (P = .05). The NPI-d worsened in 22% of patients, improved in 22%, and remained unchanged in 56%. The NPI-a worsened in 12% of patients, improved in 33%, and remained unchanged in 54%. The caregivers rated the global effect of the disclosure as negative in 8%, neutral in 71%, and positive in 21% of patients. None of the patients or their proxies reported suicide attempts or catastrophic reactions.Conclusions: The disclosure of AD is safe in most cases and may improve anxiety. Symptoms of depression and anxiety worsen only in a minority of patients. The fear of depression or catastrophic reaction should not prevent clinicians to disclose the diagnosis of AD. © 2014 The Author(s).


Eloy P.,CHU UCL Mont Godinne | Grenier J.,Universitaires Saint Luc | Pirlet A.,CHU UCL Mont Godinne | Poirrier A.L.,CHU UCL Mont Godinne | And 2 more authors.
Rhinology | Year: 2013

A fungal ball consists of a dense conglomerate of fungal hyphae growing at the surface of the sinus mucosa without tissue infiltration. The maxillary sinus is by far the most commonly involved paranasal sinus cavity followed by the sphenoid sinus. The present study is a retrospective study of 25 consecutive cases treated during the last 10 years in the two hospitals belonging to the Catholic University of Louvain (CHU Mont-Godinne and UCL Saint Luc). We report the symptomatology, the imaging and discuss the different surgical managements. We conclude that the clinician must have a high index of suspicion when dealing with a unilateral rhinosinusitis persisting despite a maximal and well conducted medical treatment. This is particularly so in elderly women when associated with facial pain and post nasal drip, particularly when the computed tomography shows an unilateral opacity of the sphenoid sinus with or without a sclerosis or an erosion of the bony walls, a polyp in the sphenoethmoidal recess or a hyperdensity mimicking a foreign body. An endonasal endoscopic sphenoidotomy is the treatment of choice in most cases, allowing good ventilation of the sinus and radical removal of all the fungal concretion. A biopsy of the sinus mucosa adjacent to fungal elements is of upmost important to confirm the non- invasiveness of the fungi within the tissue. Antifungal medication is not required in uncomplicated forms. All host factors producing some degree of immunosuppression must be corrected when present and must alert the clinician to rule out any forms of invasive disease.


PubMed | CHU UCL Mont Godinne and Catholic University of Louvain
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of geriatric psychiatry and neurology | Year: 2014

Many people fear that the disclosure of the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD) to patients will prompt depressive symptoms or catastrophic reactions. We aimed to prospectively evaluate the modification of anxiety and depressive symptoms 3 months after the disclosure of the diagnosis of AD.A total of 100 consecutive newly diagnosed patients with AD (mild or moderate stage) and their caregivers were included. The evolution of symptoms of depression and anxiety was assessed with the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (Zung SDS) and the depression item of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI-d) and the anxiety item of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI-a). After 3 months, the caregivers were asked their opinions on the global effect of the disclosure using a Likert-type scale.At 3 months, there was no significant change in the mean NPI-d (P = .87) and Zung SDS (P = .18) and a significant reduction in the NPI-a (P = .05). The NPI-d worsened in 22% of patients, improved in 22%, and remained unchanged in 56%. The NPI-a worsened in 12% of patients, improved in 33%, and remained unchanged in 54%. The caregivers rated the global effect of the disclosure as negative in 8%, neutral in 71%, and positive in 21% of patients. None of the patients or their proxies reported suicide attempts or catastrophic reactions.The disclosure of AD is safe in most cases and may improve anxiety. Symptoms of depression and anxiety worsen only in a minority of patients. The fear of depression or catastrophic reaction should not prevent clinicians to disclose the diagnosis of AD.

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