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De Bruaene A.V.,University Hospitals Leuven | Delcroix M.,University Hospitals Leuven | Pasquet A.,University Hospitals St Luc Brussels | De Backer J.,Ghent University | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Cardiology | Year: 2011

Aims: Atrial fibrillation and flutter remain an important cause of morbidity in adults with atrial septal defect (ASD). This study aimed at investigating predictors for late (≥ 1 month after repair) atrial arrhythmia. Methods: Patients who underwent ASD closure after the age of 18 years, were selected through the databases of three medical centres in Belgium. Preprocedural, periprocedural and follow-up data were extracted. Univariate and multivariate Cox-regression analysis was performed. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed for any independent predictor of late atrial arrhythmia. Results: A total of 155 patients (38 men and 117 women) was included. Twenty-four patients (median age 48.3 years, range 19.9-79.8) underwent surgical and 131 (median age 57.6 years, range 18.2-86.9) underwent transcatheter closure. Thirty-nine patients (25.2%) presented with late atrial arrhythmia. Male gender (P = 0.008), creatinine (P = 0.002), atrial arrhythmia before (P < 0.0001) and within 1 month after repair (P = 0.001) and a mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) ≥ 25 mm Hg (P < 0.0001) correlated with late atrial arrhythmia in univariate Cox-regression analysis. Multivariate analysis showed that mPAP ≥ 25 mm Hg (HR 3.72; 95%CI 1.82-7.59; P < 0.0001) and the presence of atrial arrhythmia before (HR 3.22; 95%CI 1.56-6.66; P = 0.002) and within 1 month after repair (HR 2.08; 95%CI 2.08-15.92; P = 0.001) were predictive of late atrial arrhythmia. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with a mPAP ≥ 25 mm Hg had a higher risk at developing late atrial arrhythmia (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: In patients with ASD type secundum, a mPAP ≥ 25 mm Hg is an independent predictor of late atrial arrhythmia. The presence of pulmonary hypertension before repair should raise awareness for atrial arrhythmias and may be used to guide therapy. © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


De Bruaene A.V.,University Hospitals Leuven | Moons P.,University Hospitals Leuven | Belmans A.,University Hospitals Leuven | Post M.C.,St. Antonius Hospital | And 7 more authors.
International Journal of Cardiology | Year: 2013

Objectives: To develop a quantitative event-free prediction model of late atrial arrhythmia after atrial septal defect (ASD) repair. Background: The clinical management of ASD is driven by risk factors that determine the occurrence of late atrial arrhythmia. Methods: Data from ASD type secundum patients, included in the Belgian Congenital Heart Disease Registry, were analyzed. Based on review of the literature, age at repair, gender, pulmonary hypertension, atrial arrhythmia before and within one month after repair were included in the model. Using Cox-regression analysis, a weighted risk score was derived, which was validated using the Brier score. Results: A total of 155 patients (117 women; median age at follow-up 53.9 years, range 18.0-78.8) having 349 follow-up years was included. Thirty-nine patients (25.2%) presented with late atrial arrhythmia. Multivariate analysis showed that a mPAP ≥ 25 mmHg (HR 4.39; 95%CI 2.17-9.09; P < 0.0001), the presence of atrial arrhythmia before (HR 3.52; 95%CI 1.75-7.14; P = 0.002) and ≤ 1 month after repair (HR 6.62; 95%CI 2.38-20.00; P < 0.0001) and gender (HR 2.18 95%CI 1.11-4.35) were associated with late atrial arrhythmia. A risk score (0 to 28 points) to predict atrial arrhythmia free survival was derived for follow-up times ranging from one to 5 years. Mean Brier score for the model was 0.10. Conclusions: We formulated a well validated risk model to predict arrhythmia-free survival in ASD patients undergoing ASD repair. Further research is needed whether this model can be used for individual clinical risk stratification and whether the model can be adapted for application in other congenital heart defects. © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Van De Bruaene A.,University Hospitals Leuven | Delcroix M.,University Hospitals Leuven | Pasquet A.,University Hospitals St Luc Brussels | De Backer J.,Ghent University | And 6 more authors.
European Heart Journal | Year: 2011

Aims Iron deficiency is common in patients with Eisenmenger syndrome (ES). This study aimed at evaluating (i) whether iron deficiency is related with adverse outcome, (ii) the determinants of iron deficiency, and (iii) the relation between iron reserves and haemoglobin level in a contemporary cohort of ES patients. Methods and resultsAll ES patients, older than 18 years, selected from the Belgian Eisenmenger registry, were prospectively followed using a web-based registry. Univariate Cox-regression analysis was performed to evaluate the relation with outcome, defined as all-cause mortality, transplantation, and hospitalisation due to cardiopulmonary causes. Bivariate analysis was performed where applicable.A total of 68 patients with a complete dataset (mean age 36.9 ± 14.2 years; 30.9 male) were included. During a median follow-up time of 3.1 years, 21 patients (30.9) reached the predefined endpoint. New York Heart Association (NYHA) class Source

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