CHR de Metz Thionville

Montigny-lès-Metz, France

CHR de Metz Thionville

Montigny-lès-Metz, France
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Lai A.,Nancy University Hospital Center | Outin H.D.,CHI de Poissy Saint Germain en Laye | Jabot J.,CHU Reunion | Megarbane B.,University Paris - Sud | And 15 more authors.
Critical Care | Year: 2015

Introduction: To characterize etiology, clinical course and outcomes of patients in prolonged refractory status epilepticus (PRSE) and looking for prognostic factors. Methods: Retrospective study conducted in patients hospitalized from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2011 in 19 polyvalent intensive care units in French university and general hospitals. Patients were adults with a generalized convulsive refractory status epilepticus that lasted more than seven days, despite treatment including an anesthetic drug and mechanical ventilation. Patients with anoxic encephalopathy were excluded. Follow-up phone call was used to determine functional outcome using modified Rankin Scale (mRS) with mRS 0-3 defining good and mRS 4-6 poor outcome. Results: 78 patients (35 female) were included. Median age was 57 years. Causes of status epilepticus were various, mainly including prior epilepsy (14.1%), CNS infection (12.8%), and stroke (12.8%). No etiology was found in 27 (34.6%) patients. PRSE was considered controlled in only 53 (67.9%) patients after a median duration of 17 (IQR 12-26) days. The median length of ICU stay was 28 (19-48) days. Forty-one (52.5%) patients died in the ICU, 26 from multiple organ failure, 8 from care withdrawal, 2 from sudden cardiac arrest, 1 from brain death and 4 from unknown causes. PRSE was previously resolved in 20 patients who died in the ICU. At one-year follow-up, there were 12 patients with good outcome and 58 with poor outcome and 8 lost of follow-up. On multivariate analysis, only vasopressor use was a predictor of poor outcome (OR 6.54; 95%CI 1.09-39.29; p = 0.04). Conclusion: Poor outcome was observed in about 80% of this population of PRSE. Most patients died from systemic complications linked to their ICU stay. Some patients can recover satisfactorily over time though we did not identify any robust factor of good outcome. © 2015 Lai et al.; licensee BioMed Central.


Fakhouri F.,Nantes University Hospital Center | Delmas Y.,Bordeaux University Hospital Center | Provot F.,Lille University Hospital Center | Barbet C.,CHU de Tours | And 14 more authors.
American Journal of Kidney Diseases | Year: 2014

Background Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a devastating form of renal thrombotic microangiopathy. Despite plasma exchange, the standard treatment of aHUS for decades, the renal prognosis for patients with aHUS has remained poor. We assessed the off-trial use of eculizumab in adult patients with aHUS affecting the native kidneys. Study Design A retrospective study was conducted. aHUS was defined as the presence of 3 or more of the following: acute kidney injury (serum creatinine >1.4 mg/dL [120 μmol/L]), mechanical hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and the presence of thrombotic microangiopathy features in a kidney biopsy specimen. Patients who had received 4 or more weekly 900-mg infusions of eculizumab were included. Setting & Participants 19 patients were identified through a query sent to all French nephrology centers. Outcomes & Measurements Evolution of kidney function, hemolysis, and thrombocytopenia after the initiation of eculizumab therapy. Results All patients had acute kidney injury (serum creatinine range, 2.2-17.0 mg/dL) and 12 required hemodialysis. Thirteen patients carried a mutation in 1 complement gene and 1 had anti-factor H antibodies. For first-line therapy, 16 patients underwent plasma exchange and 3 patients received eculizumab. Median time between aHUS onset and eculizumab therapy initiation was 6 (range, 1-60) days and median time to platelet count normalization after eculizumab therapy initiation was 6 (range, 2-42) days. At the 3-month follow-up, 4 patients still required dialysis, 8 had non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease, and 7 had normalized kidney function. At last follow-up (range, 4-22 months), 3 patients remained dialysis dependent, 7 had non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 17-55 mL/min/1.73 m 2), and 9 had normal kidney function. Risks of reaching end-stage renal disease within 3 months and 1 year of aHUS onset were reduced by half in eculizumab-treated patients compared with recent historical controls. Limitations Retrospective study and use of historical controls. Conclusions Our data indicate that eculizumab improves kidney disease outcome in patients with aHUS. © 2013 by the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.


PubMed | Brest University Hospital Center, Center Arnault Tzank, University Pierre and Marie Curie, Limoges University Hospital Center and 15 more.
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Annales de cardiologie et d'angeiologie | Year: 2015

Data on regional variations in the characteristics, management and early outcome of patients admitted with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in France are limited. We used data from the FAST-MI 2010 registry to determine whether regional specificities existed, dividing the French territory into 6 larger geographical regions. Variations in the patients characteristics were found, partly related to regional variations in demography. Acute reperfusion strategy showed more use of primary percutaneous coronary intervention in the greater Paris area, compared to other regions, which would be expected owing to geography and local availability of catheterization laboratories. Overall, however, in-hospital management showed more similarities than differences across regions. Complications, and in particular in-hospital mortality, did not differ significantly among regions.


PubMed | Besancon University Hospital Center, CH de Perpignan, CHU de Poitiers, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou and 13 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation | Year: 2013

Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a devastating form of renal thrombotic microangiopathy. Despite plasma exchange, the standard treatment of aHUS for decades, the renal prognosis for patients with aHUS has remained poor. We assessed the off-trial use of eculizumab in adult patients with aHUS affecting the native kidneys.A retrospective study was conducted. aHUS was defined as the presence of 3 or more of the following: acute kidney injury (serum creatinine >1.4 mg/dL [120 mol/L]), mechanical hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and the presence of thrombotic microangiopathy features in a kidney biopsy specimen. Patients who had received 4 or more weekly 900-mg infusions of eculizumab were included.19 patients were identified through a query sent to all French nephrology centers.Evolution of kidney function, hemolysis, and thrombocytopenia after the initiation of eculizumab therapy.All patients had acute kidney injury (serum creatinine range, 2.2-17.0 mg/dL) and 12 required hemodialysis. Thirteen patients carried a mutation in 1 complement gene and 1 had anti-factor H antibodies. For first-line therapy, 16 patients underwent plasma exchange and 3 patients received eculizumab. Median time between aHUS onset and eculizumab therapy initiation was 6 (range, 1-60) days and median time to platelet count normalization after eculizumab therapy initiation was 6 (range, 2-42) days. At the 3-month follow-up, 4 patients still required dialysis, 8 had non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease, and 7 had normalized kidney function. At last follow-up (range, 4-22 months), 3 patients remained dialysis dependent, 7 had non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 17-55 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), and 9 had normal kidney function. Risks of reaching end-stage renal disease within 3 months and 1 year of aHUS onset were reduced by half in eculizumab-treated patients compared with recent historical controls.Retrospective study and use of historical controls.Our data indicate that eculizumab improves kidney disease outcome in patients with aHUS.

Loading CHR de Metz Thionville collaborators
Loading CHR de Metz Thionville collaborators